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by Darrin Doyle

  • ISBN: 0312592310
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Darrin Doyle
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
  • Other formats: rtf azw lrf txt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin; 1 edition (January 5, 2010)
  • Pages: 242 pages
  • FB2 size: 1761 kb
  • EPUB size: 1960 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 674
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Darrin Doyle's The Girl Who Ate Kalamazoo is wildly out there, but its message about family dysfunction is achingly real. I wasn't 10 pages into Darrin Doyle's new novel, when I thought to myself, "Ah, Donald Barthelme.

Darrin Doyle's The Girl Who Ate Kalamazoo is wildly out there, but its message about family dysfunction is achingly real. com, Best New Winter Reads Pick. As quirky, funny, and masterful as it is, Darrin Doyle's The Girl Who Ate Kalamazoo isn't just a book about a girl who ate a city-it's about the hunger we all have, for love, for family, and for home. Alix Ohlin, author of The Missing Person and Babylon and Other Stories. In particular, I was reminded of his story, "I Bought a Little City" (Ain't it Pretty), in which a wealthy man purchases Galveston, Texas.

This is a work of fiction. Printed in the United States of America. All of the characters, organizations, and events portrayed in this novel are either products of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. The girl who ate kalamazoo. For information, address St. Martin’s Press, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, .

In this charming novel, Darrin Doyle paints a captivatin. I won this book from a goodreads giveaway

In this charming novel, Darrin Doyle paints a captivatin. In this charming novel, Darrin Doyle paints a captivating portrait of the all-American family-if the all-American family's youngest child ate an entire city in Michigan with a smile, that is. Doyle has a flare for writing about family dysfunction with a twist. I won this book from a goodreads giveaway. The Girl Who Ate Kalamazoo is an interesting tragicomedy of a middle-class family in Michigan who, in the absence of emotional depth, speaks through their relationships with food. How they interact it with it, interact with others around it (or don't), and how it effects their lives.

Darrin Doyle rated a book really liked i. Darrin Doyle rated a book it was amazing.

Darrin Doyle rated a book really liked it. Y is for Fidelity by Logan Ryan Smith (Goodreads Author).

In this charming novel, Darrin Doyle paints a captivating portrait of the all-American family-if the all-American .

In this charming novel, Darrin Doyle paints a captivating portrait of the all-American family-if the all-American family's youngest child ate an entire city in Michigan with a smile, that is. With a unique blend of realism and fantasy, The Girl Who Ate Kalamazoo is the moving story of the hauntingly beautiful Audrey Mapes, who began her illustrious "career" by downing crayons by the carton only to graduate to eating an entire city one bite at a time.

What could a Catholic education mean to two kids who thought Noah’s Ark was some old man’s forty-day piss stream? Not much, truth be told. But for better or worse, it got them out of the house. But for better or worse, it got them out of the house school hadn’t been offered; the twins never heard that word until they came to kindergarten. They would learn a number of valuable words and phrases at St. Monica’s-covenant, forgiveness, only begotten, transubstantiation, Body of Christ, and sin. Among other children, he flourished. Published by Thriftbooks.

In this charming novel, Darrin Doyle paints a captivating portrait of the all-American family-if the all-American family’s youngest child ate an entire city i. . com User, 9 years ago. The Girl Who Ate Kalamazoo melds a family drama, with all its inherent emotional heft, with something very like a monster movie. Doyle's characters are refracted through the narrative lens of McKenna Mapes, sister to the titular "Girl.

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With a unique blend of realism and fantasy, The Girl Who Ate Kalamazoo is the moving story of the hauntingly beautiful Audrey Mapes, who began her illustrious "career" by downing crayons by the carton only to graduate to eating an entire city one bite at a time. With vivid, acerbic wit, Doyle details the life of the world's most gifted "eatist" through the eyes of Audrey's sister, McKenna  . Books related to The Girl Who Ate Kalamazoo.

Doyle, Darrin, 1970-. Dysfunctional families, Young women. New York : St. Martin's Griffin. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. t on October 14, 2011.

In this charming novel, Darrin Doyle paints a captivating portrait of the all-American family―if the all-American family's youngest child ate an entire city in Michigan with a smile, that is. Doyle has a flare for writing about family dysfunction with a twist. With a unique blend of realism and fantasy, The Girl Who Ate Kalamazoo is the moving story of the hauntingly beautiful Audrey Mapes, who began her illustrious "career" by downing crayons by the carton only to graduate to eating an entire city one bite at a time. With vivid, acerbic wit, Doyle details the life of the world's most gifted "eatist" through the eyes of Audrey's sister, McKenna. Through her eyes, we see the real tragedy of the Mapes story is not the destruction of a city, but rather, the quiet disintegration of a family who just didn't quite know how to love.


Reviews about The Girl Who Ate Kalamazoo: A Novel (7):
Ytli
(published in The Manhattan Mercury 1/24/2010)
If it's true that literature is an on-going conversation - a conceit too often repeated to be attributed to anyone - then before discussing a work of fiction, one should first consider a work that preceded its creation. This is actually much less contrived than it sounds, for when hearing of a new novel, say one that takes place in a single day, who of us doesn't think, "Ah, Woolf," or "Ah, Joyce," and then being making comparisons?
I wasn't 10 pages into Darrin Doyle's new novel, when I thought to myself, "Ah, Donald Barthelme." In particular, I was reminded of his story, "I Bought a Little City" (Ain't it Pretty), in which a wealthy man purchases Galveston, Texas. This isn't, in reality, a thing one can do, but that doesn't stop the protagonist from telling, in plainest detail, what he did with his new acquisition:
"I went out on the streets then and shot six thousand dogs. This gave me great satisfaction and you have no idea how wonderfully it improved the city for the better...Then I went down to the Galveston News, the morning paper, and wrote an editorial denouncing myself as the vilest creature the good God had ever placed on earth."
We accept the circumstances, that he purchased Galveston, because it's immediately presented, and also because the story is interesting, well-written, and engaging. This is how Doyle's narrative works as well.
In the fictitious "Note From the Editor," we are informed that from 1997 to 1999, the beautiful and famous eatist Audrey Mapes ate the city of Kalamazoo, Mich. The text of the book is supposedly a compilation of hand-written notes jotted down by her sister McKenna, notes purchased by D. M. Doyle. "There was no cohesion to the random jottings. No story," the editor explains. "So Mr. Doyle sculpted it, trimmed it, molded it; like Dr. Frankenstein, he stitched together the necrotic segments in order to breath life into the rantings of this decidedly melancholy and plain woman.
The narrative then follows. Each chapter is short, easily digestible, if you will, and resembles a cleaned up note, one give both a thematic and narrative arc. They don't follow chronologically, but instead jump around, spending time with each member of the Mapes family: Grandma Pencil with her religious judgment of Audrey's obsession; Audrey's brother, Toby, whose own excessive eating aims at bulking up, at achieving the perfect body; her mother, Misty, listless but loving; her father Murray, a factory worker by day and inventor by night (his patents include, "the Clock Hat, the Squeezable Survival Kit...the Collapsible Ukulele with Hairbrush"); and of course Audrey herself, stunningly beautiful despite her birth defects - an iron stomach and two stumps instead of feet.
The finale is known from the beginning - "she was the gentlest earthquake, the softest tsunami" - therefore, Doyle shows us the path as opposed to constantly pushing us toward the destination.
As a metaphor, the possibilities are endless. A girl who can't sate her appetite for nonfood could be a stand in for obesity, alcoholism, sex and/or drug addiction, the lifelong search for love, faith, family. The story of Kalamazoo, its rise and fall, growth then total destruction, could parallel the fate of any number of Michigan cities. To investigate these any further, however, would be purely academic. We are concerned with the simple question, "Is it worth reading?"
I answer a resounding, "Yes!" Not because it is profoundly meaningful - it is - but because the story is sensational, worth telling, and executed with a concision and clarity that brings us into the fold of the narrative. Perhaps even better than the descriptions of her eating, are the reactions of the townspeople:
"All they could do was stare. It was shocking, deeply unreal. Physically numbing. Narcotic...and at the same time it seemed, for lack of a better word, expected. Comforting.
"Of course, their mind-blown minds said. Of course there is a shapely woman with the face of an angel standing in my living room, gorging herself on my coffee table. Why wouldn't there be?"
In a climate of literary plots that tell of "The time nothing didn't happen," Doyle is audacious enough to write about "The time something did happen!" I believe this is a positive trend taking place in American fiction, and I applaud him.
As this is a time for predictions, I would like to lay down one of my own: The Girl Who Ate Kalamazoo will win the Pulitzer Prize this year. If it doesn't, this will simply be because the committee either didn't read it, or because they understood and enjoyed it too well.
Buy, borrow or steal this book; you won't be sorry.
Dianalmeena
I hold great admiration for authors who not only let their characters suffer psychologically, but examine that suffering in fascinating and creative ways. Here, a girl eats a city. As others have astutely noted, this is a darkly hilarious and heartbreaking book about family dysfunction, about appetite, about the loneliness of being "a freak." Doyle is adroit at making you loathe a character one minute, and then feel genuine empathy for them the next. There are ironic and interesting juxtapositions on eating disorders and bodies, which speak to the emotional and metaphysical ways that we try to "fill" ourselves up, and the emptiness that follows whether we are successful or not. Aside from all of that there is this: this is a vastly entertaining and quick paced novel. You'll, well, devour it.
Mariwyn
As other reviewers have said on this forum, this novel is "weird" and "bizarre" and filled with "quirky characters." The language is fresh and original, and the descriptions are totally unique and unexpected, as illustrated by the scene in a bar frequented by Audrey, "The Girl Who Ate Kalamazoo" : "Most of them [students] were children of 150K-a-year parents from Detroit suburbs, but living alone in a college town on the opposite side of the state let them pretend to be starving artists. These artists longed to touch the common man in order to express the dimness of his soul. These artists chain-smoked, downing pot after pot of coffee while splitting an order of fries five ways. These artists suffered physically, hunger being a tried-and-true method of unearthing the worms of their genius. These artists would impale the wrigglers onto hooks that they would then use to pierce a nose, a tongue, or, in the case of Audrey, a labia. A tortured metaphor, to be sure. But lest we forget, these were 'creative types.' "

A beautifully written and inventive story!
Soustil
The Girl Who Ate Kalamazoo melds a family drama, with all its inherent emotional heft, with something very like a monster movie. Doyle's characters are refracted through the narrative lens of McKenna Mapes, sister to the titular "Girl." Along with the fantastic aspect of its conceit--a girl, Audrey Mapes, who has a one hell of a case of pica, eats the city of Kalamazoo, and becomes internationally famous for it--her sister McKenna's fractured narrative voice, steeped in bitterness as well as regret, allows Doyle to write about those aspects of life that so many fiction writers engage without falling into cliche. It would be easy to dwell only on the idiosyncratic aspects of the book and appreciate it on that level alone. After all, can you name another book in which a girl eats a city? But, beyond the comedy and idiosyncrasy, it's the heartache at the center of the novel that delivers, that yawning hole in the Mapes family that takes an entire city to fill.

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