» » The Things They Carried

Download The Things They Carried fb2

by Tim O'Brien

  • ISBN: 0767902890
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Tim O'Brien
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
  • Other formats: lrf docx lrf lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Broadway (December 29, 1998)
  • Pages: 246 pages
  • FB2 size: 1723 kb
  • EPUB size: 1239 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 622
Download The Things They Carried fb2

The Things They Carried They carried all they could bear, and then some, including a silent awe for the terrible power of the things they carried.

The Things They Carried. First Lieutenant Jimmy Cross carried letters from a girl named Martha, a junior at Mount Sebastian College in New Jersey. They were not love letters, but Lieutenant Cross was hoping, so he kept them folded in plastic at the bottom of his rucksack. They carried all they could bear, and then some, including a silent awe for the terrible power of the things they carried. In the first week of April, before Lavender died, Lieutenant Jimmy Cross received a good-luck charm from Martha. It was a simple pebble, an ounce at most.

O'Brien generally refrains from political debate and discourse regarding the Vietnam War. He was dismayed that people in his home town seemed to have so little understanding of the war and its world.

The Things They Carried Lyrics. In the late afternoon, after a day's march, he would dig his foxhole, wash his hands under a canteen, unwrap the letters, hold them with the tips of his fingers, and spend the last hour of light pretending. He would imagine romantic camping trips into the White Mountains in New Hampshire. He would sometimes taste.

There are a couple chapters outside the period during which O’Brien (the character, who may or may not be the same as the author) is actively in an infantry unit

Ships from and sold by wellstone books. There are a couple chapters outside the period during which O’Brien (the character, who may or may not be the same as the author) is actively in an infantry unit. One early chapter describes his near attempt at draft dodging, and another talks of his time stationed at the rear after being injured. Both of these chapters offer an interesting twist in the scheme of the book overall.

It’s long been a theme in the work of The Things They Carried author Tim O’Brien, reluctant bard of the Vietnam War and soldier-poet of the .

It’s long been a theme in the work of The Things They Carried author Tim O’Brien, reluctant bard of the Vietnam War and soldier-poet of the baby boomers. He disappeared a bit himself a while back, stopped publishing and became a father of two boys, finding a fulfilling existence as a teacher in the quiet Texas suburbs.

The things they carried are in some cases physical (weapons, equipment, personal items) and in some cases .

The things they carried are in some cases physical (weapons, equipment, personal items) and in some cases intangible. It's the intangible things that O'Brien really focuses on in the book as a whole, whether it's emotions such as love or guilt, each others' guilty consciences, the weight of America's expectations, or the land of Vietnam itself. So the initial short story introduces the idea of soldiers carrying things both physical and intangible, and O'Brien carries that idea forward throughout the remainder of the book

e when you needed him, a believer in the virtues of simplicity and directness and hard labor. Like his country, too, Dobbins was drawn toward sentimentality. Even now, twenty years later, I can see him wrapping his girlfriend's pantyhose around his neck before heading out on ambush. It was his one eccentricity

The Things They Carried book. In 1979, Tim O'Brien's Going After Cacciato-a novel about the Vietnam War-won the National Book Award.

The Things They Carried book. In this, his second work of fiction about Vietnam, O'Brien's unique artistic vision is again clearly demonstrated. Neither a novel nor a short story collection, it is an arc of fictional episodes, taking place in the childhoods of its characters, in the jungles of Vietnam In 1979, Tim O'Brien's Going After Cacciato-a novel about the Vietnam War-won the National Book Award.

One of the first questions people ask about The Things They Carried is this: Is it a novel, or a collection of short stories? The title page refers to the book simply as "a work of fiction," defying the conscientious reader's need to categorize this masterpiece. It is both: a collection of interrelated short pieces which ultimately reads with the dramatic force and tension of a novel. Yet each one of the twenty-two short pieces is written with such care, emotional content, and prosaic precision that it could stand on its own.The Things They Carried depicts the men of Alpha Company: Jimmy Cross, Henry Dobbins, Rat Kiley, Mitchell Sanders, Norman Bowker, Kiowa, and of course, the character Tim O'Brien who has survived his tour in Vietnam to become a father and writer at the age of forty-three. They battle the enemy (or maybe more the idea of the enemy), and occasionally each other. In their relationships we see their isolation and loneliness, their rage and fear. They miss their families, their girlfriends and buddies; they miss the lives they left back home. Yet they find sympathy and kindness for strangers (the old man who leads them unscathed through the mine field, the girl who grieves while she dances), and love for each other, because in Vietnam they are the only family they have. We hear the voices of the men and build images upon their dialogue. The way they tell stories about others, we hear them telling stories about themselves. With the creative verve of the greatest fiction and the intimacy of a searing autobiography, The Things They Carried  is a testament to the men who risked their lives in America's most controversial war. It is also a mirror held up to the frailty of humanity. Ultimately The Things They Carried and its myriad protagonists call to order the courage, determination, and luck we all need to survive.
Reviews about The Things They Carried (7):
Vishura
It’s called a novel, but it reads like a collection of war stories and essays about being an American soldier in the Vietnam War. That’s not a criticism. In fact, it’s part of the brilliance of this book. If it were thoroughly plotted, it might not feel so authentic. As war is disjointed, so is O’Brien’s book. Some of the chapters are tiny and some are lengthy. Some read more like essays than fiction, and others are clearly fictitious.

When I say that “some are clearly fictitious,” there’s always a doubt that it might just be a true story--because war is just that absurd. An example that springs to mind is one of the most engaging pieces in the work. It’s called “Sweetheart of Song Tra Bong,” and it’s about a wholesome, young girlfriend to one of the soldiers who [improbably] comes to live in the camp. The girl acclimates to the war, and soon she is going out on patrol--not with the ordinary infantry soldiers, but during the night with the Green Berets. Perhaps the moral is that some people are made for war, and it’s never who you’d suspect. As I describe it, the premise may sound ridiculous, but the way O’Brien presents it as a story told by a Rat Kiley--a fellow infantryman known to exaggerate—it feels as though there is something very true, no matter how fictitious the story might be. Before one reads “Sweetheart of Song Tra Bong” one has been primed by a chapter entitled “How to Tell a True War Story,” which tells one that truth and falsehood aren’t so clear in the bizarre world of war.

There are a couple chapters outside the period during which O’Brien (the character, who may or may not be the same as the author) is actively in an infantry unit. One early chapter describes his near attempt at draft dodging, and another talks of his time stationed at the rear after being injured. Both of these chapters offer an interesting twist in the scheme of the book overall. We find O’Brien to be a fairly typical infantry soldier, and it seems hard to reconcile this with his floating in a canoe and narrowly deciding not to make a swim for the Canadian shoreline. However, what is odder still is realizing how distraught he is to be pulled out of his unit, particularly when he realizes that he has become an outsider and the [then rookie] medic who botched his treatment is now in the in-group. This is one of the many unusual aspects of combatant psychology that comes into play in the book, along with O’Brien’s description of how devastating it was to kill.

There are 21 chapters to the book. As I said, they run a gamut, but at all times keep one reading. It’s the shortest of the Vietnam novels I’ve read—I think. When I think of works like “Matterhorn” and “The 13th Valley,” there seems to be something hard to convey concisely about the Vietnam War, but O’Brien nails it with his unconventional novel. O’Brien also uses repetition masterfully. This can be seen in the title chapter “The Things They Carried,” which describes the many things carried by an infantry soldier—both the physical items they carried on patrol and the psychological and emotional things they carried after the war. It’s a risky approach that pays off well.

I’d recommend this book for anyone—at least anyone who can stomach war stories.
ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
This book just grabs you and won't let go. When you're finished with it it won't be finished with you. I was in the Air Force during the war - C141 cargo transport. I was never stationed in Vietnam but flying in and out several times a month. In with things needed to fight a war. Everything from soldiers to mop buckets. Out with the results. Air Evacs full of wounded, or cargo of 140 coffins filled with human remains. First book I've read in years that I didn't want to put down, but I was glad when it emded.
Blacknight
I bought this book for my English class. The story I had to read for my assignment was called "The Things They Carried", and after reading that one story, I had to read the rest. I wasn't expecting the emotional responses I had to each story. I felt as if I was there experiencing Vietnam with these soldiers. This is a realistic and very well written book.
Blackbrand
This book has something that other books don't. The writing, the people, the words, the lack of words, a comma here or a period there. Every page is so magnificently done with a finesse of heartache, dark comedy, and raw, pure, genuineness that I've never experienced in any film or text. It's addicting yet painful to read which makes the experienced of reading it all the more powerful.

This book has something that other books don't.
Umdwyn
This book is amazing! I do not read war stories. For the most part I only read epic or space fiction books. Anyhow Tim O'Brien and his amazing way to write totally changed that. If you want normal length chapters, with normal flow of ideas and a organized story structure, do not read this book. If you are ready to get your head spinning with one sentence paragraphs and stories that jump all over the place and even repeat or contradict themselves, go for it, it is totally worth it.
You will either love it, or hate it. I believe there is not in between with this book
Уou ll never walk alone
Tim O'Brien's "The Things They Carried" is awesome. It's a powerful book expressing all the conflict, fear, contradiction, pain, anger, confusion that one would feel being sent to a war like Viet Nam which was encumbered with so little understanding for why a war, against who, under what conditions, fighting for what cause and why me and not him...

All the unanswerable questions have resulted in a stack a mile high of literature to try it make it explainable if not understandable. "Matterhorn", "A Rumor of War" are two novels/near novels that would join "The Things They Carried" as examples of the grunt soldier dealing with his circumstances and their aftermath. Each of these is original, evocative, deeply personal and yet able to reach a broad audience.

"The Things They Carried" moves around between the time before the narrator goes to Vietnam, while he's there and life after. It's told in snippets that come together well. It's semi autobiographical and deeply personal. The writing is beautiful and the time jumping works effectively.

I am probably satiated now on Vietnam stories but I am glad that this is the one that put me there.

Related to The Things They Carried fb2 books: