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by Rosie Dastgir

  • ISBN: 0857383744
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Rosie Dastgir
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
  • Other formats: mobi rtf azw docx
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Quercus Publishing; UK airports ed edition (February 2, 2012)
  • Pages: 400 pages
  • FB2 size: 1641 kb
  • EPUB size: 1808 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 303
Download A Small Fortune fb2

A Small Fortune is a capable addition to its ranks - albeit too . Dastgir handles other motifs from the East-West canon less adroitly. 376 pp. Riverhead Books.

A Small Fortune is a capable addition to its ranks - albeit too familiar and too heavy with generic reflections on the clashing of cultures. At the start, the middle-aged Harris is broke. There’s an obligatory feel to the way she describes a young Muslim’s flirtation with radical Islam, as if she’s checking an item off a to-do list.

A Small Fortune offers an affectionate and affecting look at class, culture, and the heartbreak of misinterpretation. The saga of an Anglo-Pakistani family, this book shows how family members face their demons under the premise of acquiring some of a small divorce settlement. The prodigal daughter has quit medical.

1 online resource (376 pages). A smart debut novel that explores the complexities of cultural differences, family loyalties, and what is lost in translation. Harris, the patriarch of his large extended family in both England and Pakistan, has unexpectedly received a "small fortune" from his divorce settlement with an English woman. As a devout Muslim, Harris views this sum as a "burden of riches" that he must unload on someone else as quickly as possible.

A Small Fortune book. With insight, affection, and a great gift for character and story, Dastgir immerses us in a rich, beautifully drawn immigrant community and complex extended family. She considers the challenges between relatives of different cultural backgrounds, generations, and experiences-and the things they have to teach one another.

Rosie Dastgir was born in England to a Pakistani father and an English mother.

Among the strengths of writing are the naturalistic flow of her dialogue and her ear for the Yorkshire lilt. Rosie Dastgir was born in England to a Pakistani father and an English mother. She was educated at Oxford University and received an MFA in film from NYU's Tisch School of the Arts. She lives in Brooklyn.

Rosie lived in Whitechapel, East London, before moving to Brooklyn, New York, in 2005. A Small Fortune is her first novel.

A smart debut novel that explores the complexities of cultural differences, family loyalties, and what is lost in translation.

Harris Anwar is a British Pakistani proud of his Eastern heritage. In fact, it's fair to say he's proud, full stop: proud he installed his own central heating; proud of his swanky blue Citroen; even proud he's owned the same Hoover for over twenty years. The only thing rivaling his pride is his Muslim sense of responsibility and obligation. He longs to do well by those dearest to him. Whether it's his nineteen-year-old daughter, Alia, in London, his cousin Nawaz and his family, living on top of their burgeoning takeaway in Yorkshire, or his friends and family back in Pakistan, Harris feels compelled to put himself second in order to help. But there's a problem: Harris' best intentions always seem to breed the worst results. And so it's no surprise that, when he decides to use his divorce settlement for selfless means, this small fortune brings a huge cost of its own. A Small Fortune is the story of a modern British man and his family, caught between the traditions and faith of their Eastern roots and the reality of Western life.
Reviews about A Small Fortune (7):
Yellow Judge
I was prompted to read this fine debut novel from Rosie Dastgir after reading an elegant essay of hers that appeared in the "Lives" column of the New York Times Magazine. The appearance of that article - entitled "What Do I Owe to My Father's Far-Flung Family?" - coincided with the release of the book. The essay begins: "I never knew my father had a half brother until the last year of his life, when letters from a clerk in the Pakistani Army began arriving in London, freighted with festive green and gold postage stamps. My father would sigh, slitting open the envelopes, knowing that they would be filled with gloomy news."

That article makes it clear that "A Small Fortune" was a labor of the heart for the author. It has its wellsprings in her real life. It explores the binds and deep, familial sense of obligation that burdens a Pakistani immigrant even after decades ensconced in UK society. Like Dastgir's father, her protagonist Harris (née Haaris) marries an English woman. And, no doubt, the author has anchored Haaris' daughter, Alia, with more than just a little of her own experiences and thoughts in mind.

Dastgir nicely juggles and interweaves a lot of little threads: Harris' 'small fortune' and its burdens; Alia's struggle to determine her path in life; cousin Rashid's turn in life brought about by his increasing closeness to an Islamic preacher; Harris' budding romance with Farrah; the arrival of Rashid's family from Pakistan.

This feels like a real family. Rosie Dastgir writes with the authenticity and light confidence of someone who knows these people very well. I enjoyed this book a great deal and encourage others to share in the pleasure of reading it.
Leceri
A Small Fortune is a novel concerning a family of Pakistani immigrants to Great Britain, and it is not a rousing adventure. Nevertheless, this is a very worthwhile read, treating with thoughtfulness and honesty such universal human questions as identity, self-deception, and the determination of ethical behavior. The characters are all Muslims of various degrees of commitment, but a typical Christian or Jewish reader might well be surprised by how similar to their own is the view of the characters concerning their relationship with God. I am glad I read this book, and I hope you would enjoy it, as well.
Linn
This book was OK, not my favorite, but read for a book club. I would not re read it, but it was about a culture I know next to nothing about, so it was worth reading.
MOQ
Instant gratification. Wanted to read this book and downloaded to my Kindle in just a few seconds and am in the midst of reading it right now. Love Kindle and Amazon and of course, this book.
Slowly writer
I love the clarity she writes about her subjects, not a pretty picture she paints. Can feel there disappointments and struggles as immigrants. Makes you think and see with different eyes
Globus
The voice of the author is one of great affection towards her characters. They are very flawed characters but seen through the eyes of love, and a sweet, patient sense of humor.
Reemiel
Reading Rosie Dastgir's novel, "A Small Fortune," was a thoroughly delightful reading experience. I picked up the book randomly, as I had not heard of it before I started reading. Almost immediately, I was taken with Ms. Dastgir's thoughtful writing style and I knew that this would be a book I would greatly enjoy.

The premise is the plight of an extended family with members living in England and Pakistan. Harris, the "head" of the clan, lives in England and is a Western Eastener. Dastgir takes on the clashes between traditional and contemporary lifestyles, generational differences, and, most interestingly, how an unsuspecting, young, lonely naïve man starts to travel down the road of radicalization. These could be heavily handed themes in the hands of a less graceful writer, but Dastgir instead produces a focused, thoughtful narrative that never loses its forward moving pace.

I will keep my eye out for Dastgir's next book. I highly recommend "A Small Fortune" to anyone wanting to find a good book to lose themselves in.
The saga of an Anglo-Pakistani family, this book shows how family members face their demons under the premise of acquiring some of a small divorce settlement. The prodigal daughter has quit medical school, a nephew is falling in with a dangerous crowd, and a brother is desperate for help. At the center of the family is Harris, who is trying desperately to reconstruct his family and to reconstruct happier times. Harris has lost interest in the life he once relished. When he receives his divorce settlement he is torn asunder by the competing needs of his family members.

While the blurb and title suggested that the book was going to focus on Harris's efforts to get rid of his money, that really is not the major issue. Money is the background, really a premise to get the family members to work out some long-festering problems. This was an interesting enough book. I particularly enjoyed watching the relationship develop between Harris and his new love, the professor. Other parts of the story were more predictable. Still, a well-written tale of a believable family.

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