» » Dark Eagle

Download Dark Eagle fb2

by John Ensor Harr

  • ISBN: 0670887048
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: John Ensor Harr
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
  • Other formats: txt mbr mobi rtf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Viking Adult; First Edition edition (October 1, 1999)
  • Pages: 522 pages
  • FB2 size: 1900 kb
  • EPUB size: 1895 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 477
Download Dark Eagle fb2

John Ensor Harr's Dark Eagle is biased toward the British. While I find this annoying, most authors have a biased and it should not bother us if it shows. If you don't mind an anti-American slant, this historical novel is a good read with few errors.

John Ensor Harr's Dark Eagle is biased toward the British. But, who are these people writing in italics, when did they live/die?-That part is extremely confusing. I am about halfway done. In conclusion if anyone can find a way to excuse Arnold's betrayal Harr will. It will be interesting to to see-I WILL finish the book.

See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel.

See if your friends have read any of John Ensor Harr's books. John Ensor Harr’s Followers. None yet. John Ensor Harr. John Ensor Harr’s books. Dark Eagle: A Novel of Benedict Arnold and the American Revolution.

Used availability for John Ensor Harr's Dark Eagle. May 2001 : UK Paperback.

The Indians called him "Dark Eagle" out of respect for both his military genius and his ruthlessness. His men worshipped him as a hero. Harr traces Arnold's spectacular rise, culminating in his victory at Saratoga and his marriage to Peggy Shippen, the beautiful loyalist daughter of a prominent Philadelphia family, and Arnold's decline, culminating in his plan with Major John Andre and Peggy to betray Washington and deliver West Point to the British.

A stirring, dark novel of one of the nation's most notorious traitors traces his rise to prominence as Dark Eagle, a military man both feared and revered by his Indian enemies, and his treasonous attempt to sell out three thousand American troops. 17,500 first printing.

Author of Dark eagle, The professional diplomat Showing all works by author. Would you like to see only ebooks? Dark eagle.

Author of Dark eagle, The professional diplomat. The Rockefeller century, The Rockefeller conscience, The anatomy of the Foreign Service. Showing all works by author.

An epic novel of the American Revolution, and the dramatic story of the rise and fall of Benedict ArnoldThe Indians called him "Dark Eagle" out of respect for both his military genius and his ruthlessness. His men worshipped him as a hero--the legendary general of the Continental army who led them against formidable British forces. But as he neared the pinnacle of success, things began to go wrong, drawing Benedict Arnold inexorably toward the greatest crime of the age, one that would forever make his name synonymous with the word "traitor." Meticulously researched and brilliantly rendered, Dark Eagle encompasses the action on both sides of the Revolutionary War from 1775 to 1780. John Ensor Harr traces Arnold's spectacular rise--outwitting the British at Valcour Bay; the relief of Fort Stanwix; and a stunning victory at Saratoga, the turning point of the war. And he also traces Arnold's decline--a wound that nearly cost him his life; harassment by the radical government of Pennsylvania; his sense of betrayal by Congress and his Commander-in-Chief,George Washington; and finally the treasonous triangle with his new wife, Peggy Shippen, the beautiful daughter of a prominent Philadelphia family, and Major John Andre, the Englishman she loved.From the glory of Arnold's early days on the battlefield, to the wrath he incurred as he attempted to deliver West Point and three thousand American troops into the hands of the British, Dark Eagle is the extraordinary story of one of the most complex, tragic heroes in history.
Reviews about Dark Eagle (7):
Zorve
A solid account of Benedict Arnold's life, especially his largely unknown Patriotic heroism before 1778. Would have been 5-stars if characters didn't speak in 21st century English.
Maucage
John Ensor Harr's Dark Eagle is biased toward the British. While I find this annoying, most authors have a biased and it should not bother us if it shows. If you don't mind an anti-American slant, this historical novel is a good read with few errors.

But, who are these people writing in italics, when did they live/die?--That part is extremely confusing.

I am about halfway done. In conclusion if anyone can find a way to excuse Arnold's betrayal Harr will. It will be interesting to to see--I WILL finish the book.

Betty
Kale
I would say about two months ago when I visited Amazon.com to order a book to send to a friend of mine, a recommendation popped up. The recommendation was John Ensor Harr's "Dark Eagle." I must say that the recommendation was right on the nose.
Harr's novel is a masterpiece. In brilliant strokes he painted an accurate and even-handed portrait of the American Revolution and of that tragically reviled character, Benedict Arnold.
Tragically reviled is the term of art and is so because, unless you believe in historic inevitability, his fate did not have to turn out like it did. Harr's portrayal of Arnolds wrangling with the Continental Congress provides great insight into the role and function of that body. The awe and power of Congress' issuance of the Declaration of Independence belies the fact it was an extremely weak body with very little power. The book does well to portray the struggles between Congress and Genereal Washington, between Congress and its citizens, between the newly formed States and Congress, between General Washington and the States and finally, how all of those struggles were inter-related and formed the basis and antagonism for the struggle between Washington and the British. It is against this backdrop that citizens and soldiers like Benedict Arnold had to deal with the Continental Congress and, in the case of Arnold, makes it all the more understandable why he found such difficulty in dealing with Congress.
Second, Harr's portrayal of the Continental Army's Officer Staff provides another source for Benedict Arnold's tragic fall. For those who may wonder whether General Horatio Gates truly was the destructive force for the army that John Ensor Harr made him out to be, he was. His portrayal reminds me of a line from "The Patriot" (an enjoyable, but not truly accurate depiction of the American Revolution) when Mel Gibson asked cynically, "Where's your General Gates now?" after Gates' rout in Trenton.
The intellectual fulcrum of the book actually appears towards the end of the novel: (pg. 431)
Arnold: What do they call it [changing one's allegiance]
Peggy: It depends on who wins
Arnold: What do they call it until someone wins
Peggy: They call it treason.
"They call it treason." One should always bear in mind the fact that we all accept today the proposition as true that what occured upon American soil beginning in 1775 was a revolution fought by patriots. However, in 1779 the issue was not at all clear. Had the "revolution" failed; had Congress been captured and Washington's army defeated, those same patriots who drafted the Declaration of Independence would now be judged as traitors.
"Dark Eagle" is as much historical fiction as it is a good old fashion morality play and demands that the reader make the same hard choices that Benedict Arnold made and in so doing, allows the reader to truly judge Arnold.
Urreur
Although John Ensor Harr is not the American Revolution's answer to Hilary Mantel, and "Dark Eagle" lacks the fluid, graceful and intense prose of Mantel's French Revolution-era story "A Place of Greater Safety," Mr. Harr's novel is, however, an interesting and worthwhile piece of historical fiction. It did take me a while to get into the book, due to the clunky pacing and rapid changing of viewpoints- I confused many of the minor characters since many of them are not particularly well characterized. However, unlike the gentleman before me, I had no trouble with the upper-class Loyalist tone of the story. I actually find it refreshing- so many books set in this time period are filled with flag-waving hokum a la "The Patriot" or "Johnny Tremaine," that it's nice to see something that DOESN'T portray the American Revolution as the apex of goodness and light! (I challenge anybody who does think this way to read chapter 4 of Howard Zinn's "A People's History of the United States.") I thought, all in all, Mr. Harr very sensitively portrayed Benedict Arnold's virtues and failings. The secondary characters- the sophisticated yet clueless redcoat John Andre and the manipulative society belle Peggy Shippen- are fascinating as well. All of them- Arnold, Andre and Peggy- make a wonderful trio, and seeing how they all destroy themselves through lust, pride and greed is the stuff worthy of a Balzac novel. In the end, "Dark Eagle" is about the destructive power of money and pride. There is no place for the conceits of American propaganda in this book; it is devoted to the study of the rise and fall of a proud, talented and- ultimately- pathetic individual. Anyone who would not find this interesting, please look elsewhere.
Tuliancel
No doubt the case of Benedict Arnold gets short shrift in most elemental high school text books. As a result, Arnold is seen as a murky figure (Dark Eagle?) who betrayed his country at the very moment of its birth in order to improve his own lot. This is a partial truth. In fact, Arnold was America's greatest fighting General throughout the early years of the Revolutionary War (as Washington was the greatest retreating General in that same conflict....no disrepect intended), and for multiple, purely political reasons dealing with the different states' insecurities, he was perhaps the least recognized. In fact, he financed his entire army, and never received adequate recognition or reimbursement from the Congress. In any event, the book makes a compelling case for Arnold. It is wonderfully written, hard to put down. The reader is mesmerized by the injustices done to General Arnold, and saddened by his ultimate treason. Brought sharply into focus are many other players on that stage, including Washington, Major John Andre and a host of mediocre Generals who were green with envy at Arnold's prowess. There is a reason for such books to be written: we must learn from our errors and see that they are not repeated.

Related to Dark Eagle fb2 books: