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by Andy Adams

  • ISBN: 0809436981
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Andy Adams
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
  • Other formats: txt lrf lit doc
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Time-Life Books (1981)
  • FB2 size: 1641 kb
  • EPUB size: 1880 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 264
Download The log of a cowboy: A narrative of the old trail days (Classics of the Old West) fb2

To the cowmen and boys of the old western trail. These pages are gratefully dedicated.

To the cowmen and boys of the old western trail. During the first few days of the raid, a number of mounted foragingparties passed our house, but its poverty was all too apparent, andnothing was molested. Several of these parties were driving herds ofcattle and work stock of every description, while by day and by nightgins and plantation houses were being given to the flames. Ourone-roomed log cabin was spared, due to the ingenious tale told by mymother as to the whereabouts of my father; and yet she taught herchildren to fear God and tell the truth.

The Log of a Cowboy book  . Andy Adams was a cowboy for 12 years. In 1903, flat broke and annoyed by the plethora of ridiculous books that purported to depict the true-life adventures of cowboys, he decided to try his own hand at writing a novel. The result is a beautifully written book, filled with fascinating detail of everyday life on the trail in 1882, as a team of 12 cowhands, 1 cook, 1 horse wrangler and a foreman drive 3100 cattle from Brownsville, Texas to the Blackfoot Indian Reservation in Montana.

Andy Adams compresses a number of cattle drives together to make one in the book. He used a fictitious name but the main character is himself. He had 12 years total in the saddle as a cowboy. One person found this helpful.

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A classic fictional chronicle of life on the open trail, THE LOG OF A COWBOY has long been considered the best and .

In the years following the Civil War, sixteen-year-old Andy Adams left his home in the San Antonio Valley and took to the range. Here he charts his first journey as a bona fide cowboy, from south Texas to Montana along the western trail.

My two older brothers went first, but my father and mother made strenuous efforts to keep me at home, and did so until I was sixteen. I suppose it is natural for every country boy to be fascinated with some other occupation than the one to which he is bred. In my early teens, I always thought I should like either to drive six horses to a stage or clerk in a store, and if I could have attained either of those lofty heights, at that age, I would have asked no more.

The Log of a Cowboy" is a 1903 novel by Andy Adams. The narrator, a boy in his late teens, takes part in a large-scale cattle drive from Texas to an Indian reservation in Montana. On their way, they must endure rustlers, renegade Indians, treacherous terrain, stampedes, criminals, droughts, and more. Andy Adams (1859 - 1935) was an American western fiction writer. Other notable works by this author include: "A Texas Matchmaker" (1904), "A Texas Matchmaker" (1905) and "Cattle Brands" (1906).

Of all the books assigned, I liked it best for its sense of absolute authenticity. Oddly, most of the class disliked it, perhaps because it was not fictionalized enough. antiquary, June 15, 2008.

The trail proper consisted of many scores of irregular cow paths, united into one broad passageway, narrowing and widening as conditions permitted, yet ever leading northward. After a few years of continued use, it became as well defined as the course of a river

The trail proper consisted of many scores of irregular cow paths, united into one broad passageway, narrowing and widening as conditions permitted, yet ever leading northward. After a few years of continued use, it became as well defined as the course of a river. Several herds which had started farther up country were ahead of ours, and this we considered an advantage, for wherever one herd could go, it was reasonable that others could follow.

Straightforwardly told, rich in detail, and laced with appealing campfire humor, Andy Adams's realistic The Log of a Cowboy is a classic portrayal of the western cattle country. Drawing on his own experiences as a cowboy working in cattle and horse drives, Adams presents a vivid portrait of the challenges of trail life on a cattle drive from Texas to Montanaâ?the daily drudgery of cattle trailing, as well as the dramatic stampedes and other treacherous disruptions. Populated by a wide variety of well-drawn, lively characters, The Log of a Cowboy remains the landmark novel of the American West a century after its first appearance.

First time in Penguin Classics
Reviews about The log of a cowboy: A narrative of the old trail days (Classics of the Old West) (7):
Tygolar
I think the most rewarding part of the book is the language of the era and the culture. The speech I grew up with resonated with echoes of what was spoken here in Texas in the late 19th century. The words, expressions, and phrases were comfortably familiar.

The "violence" and "sexual content" were not even a "PG" rating--they were written in the most gentle and "genteel" manner...definitely a "G" rating.

This rider and these drovers seem to have fallen into all of the adventures that ever ocurred on these drives...fascinating reading.

For the price, this book is outstanding!

Flies in the ointment: e.g., unnecessary little flaws- the typists slipped in a few UK English spellings... centre, etc.
Bluddefender
This the second Time Life Classics of the Old West I've read. Life With The Apache was a little better 5 stars ( see my review).

Andy Adams compresses a number of cattle drives together to make one in the book. He used a fictitious name but the main character is himself. He had 12 years total in the saddle as a cowboy. The first edition was in 1903.The original text was used and the publisher lets us know there may be some spelling mistakes as nothing was changed. There are several mistakes like did n't instead of didn't. A few misspelled words. INMO it did not detract from the reading. The book is a page burner and those interested in cattle driving will want to read on. I read the 387 page book in two days. Plus there are some nice B/W prints. Some of them are really great and I'd like to have lithographs like them to put on the den wall.

The owner contracts out with the US government via The Blackfoot Indian Agency to drive thousands of cattle from Texas into Montana and hand over the cattle to the US government to be given to the Blackfoot Indian Agency to be distributed to Indian families. Foreman Flood and his handpicked team of cowboys do the cattle driving.

We see the long 3,000 mile journey. A member of the team called Rebel ( ex confederate soldier) kills a man drawing guns on him in a bar who supports ex General Grant. The Rebel only wanted to relax a little in town and get a drink, but is insulted. We see another foreman (leading another herd of cattle) drowning ...horse and cattle swimming, a river. A sad eulogy by a minister. Lots of good food cooked on the range from the chuck wagon. We see the cattlemen giving 3 head of cattle to an Indian chief to feed his squaws and papooses. Also a group of rustlers who tried to sweet talk the cattleman to allow them ( the rustlers) to "cut" their cattle from the main herd. All a sham to just get some of the cattleman's cattle. The rustlers are delivered to the authority for justice. Lots of scenery description, events and more. A good description of Dodge city and the no nonsense gun shooting allowed by the town's law enforcement.

Again we see how dangerous it was going through big steams and rivers as sometimes there was quicksand. About a hundred head of cattle get bogged down in quicksand under the waters of a river.A huge steer has to be destroyed as it got bogged down in quicksand and a number of horses, ropes and cowboys pulled and pulled to get it out. Unfortunately one of the steers legs was held by the suction of the mud so much the leg was completely twisted off. Gross!

Good story telling around the campfire.

I loved the part about hiring another man to make "Bear Paws"...donuts. He makes hundreds and hundreds of them. The word gets out how good they taste and cowboys from other camps come to eat his great "Bear Paws". Some say the best they ever ate in 40 years on the range! Also a funny card game to see who will get the spare turkey egg for breakfast. Each gets one but there is one extra. Another funny part is when the cowboys after a long hard day are trying to get sleep. A coyote gets in the camp looking for something to eat. One of the tired cowboy throws one of his boots at the coyote. In the morning he discoverers his boot went in the campfire and is all burned up.

Those who want a true description of an 1888 cattle drive and learning about the life of real cowboys will appreciate this book. After the railroad connected to the various cattle producing areas and the receiving/distribution centers throughout the US the long multi thousand mile cattle drives were over and this part of the old west ended forever. Cattle ranchers could ship their beef faster, cheaper and easier.

There is small part with a couple of miners. I would of given the book 5 stars if it would of had more occupations than just cattle driving. I liked the two Time Life Classics of the Old West so much I bought another nine used in the series and may buy more if I can afford it. The Log Of A Cowboy 4 1/3 stars and proudly added to our family library.
Nikohn
I bought this as a gift for someone as it truly is a great book that I have an earlier 387page version of. This recent printing is 140ish pages of ridiculously tiny print which has everything except the chapter text removed; No title page, no table of contents, no preface, no intro. Very very disappointed! No way will I gift this printing. I should have noted that all the most recent reviews were low.
Connorise
I thoroughly enjoyed this book, even though I am not into ranch or cowboy history. It's about how people lived, who happened to be cowboys and an integral part of the growth of this country. The writer was surprisingly articulate, and the book is very well written, which makes it more interesting. There was never a dull page, and the language is not cumbersome, either. The hardships were reported factually, that was just the way they lived; the story was overall positive.
I bought this copy as a gift for someone who enjoys history and stories about real life, like this, and people caring and keeping on in spite of obstacles.
Timberahue
Not a biographical work, but reads like one. The author actually did have experience as a trail ride cowboy and certainly did know from first hand experience as well as the tales told about the privations, dangers, and good times of the trail drive.

A must read for anyone interested in writing about the "Old West" or anyone involved in reenacting "Old West" characters. The background knowledge and glimpse into the lives of "real cowboys" will be worth the price alone. And you might even find yourself reading it more than once our of pure enjoyment.

Lin McLean,The Virginian (Townsend Library Edition),Lady Baltimore, or any of the books by Owen Wister on the shelf next to this book and one would have a good fiction source-book set for writing Historical Fiction or screenplays about the "Old West" and cowboys.
Dark_Sun
This book was very enjoyable read. Great inclusion of details of cattle drive from origin in Mexico to the Indian Reservations run by the Government. I found much overlap with a similar period book called, The American Cowboy, Myth and Reality. I prefer this book for the consistent, vivid description of a cowboy life and work on a cattle drive. The Dakota Cowboy left me a strong, realistic impression of the cattle drive, workers and that rare ability to capture and reflect on the change that came to the prairie and native Indians.
Madi
A true story. I read it a few decades ago and decided to read it again. Great stuff. Any reader wanting to know what the cattle trails in the old west were like, this is the book.
Very realistic for fiction and is plausible enough to be believable. Very similar in truth to other ‘cowboy’ stories I have read.

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