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by David Kirby

  • ISBN: 0820329096
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: David Kirby
  • Subcategory: Essays & Correspondence
  • Other formats: txt mbr docx mobi
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Georgia Press (March 25, 2007)
  • Pages: 280 pages
  • FB2 size: 1441 kb
  • EPUB size: 1235 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 194
Download Ultra-Talk: Johnny Cash, The Mafia, Shakespeare, Drum Music, St. Teresa Of Avila, And 17 Other Colossal Topics Of Conversation fb2

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Further, he argues, it must be embraced repeatedly over time

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In Ultra-Talk, David Kirby poses a simple question: What . Ultra-Talk is one of the most deliciously unclassifiable books I’ve read in years.

This collection of fast-paced but well-wrought essays are really 'colossal topics of conversation. They ebb and flow, jump forward and back in time, straddle the ocean, and bridge brows high and low, in the way of every truly great conversation.

book by David K. Kirby.

Ultra-Talk: Johnny Cash, The Mafia, Shakespeare, Drum Music, St. Teresa of Avila, and . David Kirby: Words, Wisdom, Women, Whitman, Willie Mays and the White House, and 17 other questions David Kirby doesn't answer. Teresa of Avila, and 17 Other Colossal Topics of Conversation (University of Georgia Press, 2007). The Temple Gate Called Beautiful (Alice James Books, 2008). Little Richard: The Birth of Rock 'n' Roll (Continuum International Publishing Group, 2009). Talking about Movies with Jesus (LSU Press, 2011). Essays and interviews. David Kirby: Words, Wisdom, Women, Whitman, Willie Mays and the White House, and 17 other questions David Kirby doesn't answer

In Ultra-Talk, David Kirby poses a simple question: What makes a cultural phenomenon truly great? . Ultra-Talk pays homage to the work of two towering writers and critics. No current Talk conversations about this book.

Further, he argues, it must be embraced repeatedly over time. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Giacomo Leopardi both stated that a book was valid only if it had been accepted by both an intellectual elite and a vast public.

His book "Ultra-Talk: Johnny Cash, the Mafia, Shakespeare, Drum Music, St. Teresa of Avila and 17 Other Colossal Topics of Conversation" will appear in 2007. We are continually improving the quality of our text archives

His book "Ultra-Talk: Johnny Cash, the Mafia, Shakespeare, Drum Music, St. We are continually improving the quality of our text archives.

Ultra-Talk succeeds primarily when it allows Kirby the literature professor to do his thing most directly .

Ultra-Talk succeeds primarily when it allows Kirby the literature professor to do his thing most directly: explaining Shakespeare, Whitman, Dante, or Dickinson. David Kirby is a poet, literature professor, journalist, and cultural critic.

Inked Well David Kirby. The sudden popularity of tattoos among the American bourgeoisie is undeniable. But what does it mean? Appeared in: Volume 02, Number 2 Published on: November 1, 2006

Inked Well David Kirby. But what does it mean? Appeared in: Volume 02, Number 2 Published on: November 1, 2006. David Kirby teaches English at Florida State University and is the author of Ultra-Talk: Johnny Cash, The Mafia, Shakespeare, Drum Music, St. Teresa of Avila, and 17 Other Colossal Topics of Conversation, forthcoming in 2007. com and affiliated sites.

In Ultra-Talk, David Kirby poses a simple question: What makes a cultural phenomenon truly great? Exploring a wide variety of "king-sized cultural monuments," Kirby argues that one qualification for greatness is that a phenomenon be embraced by both the elite and the general public. Further, he argues, it must be embraced repeatedly over time.

Kirby turns his critical eye to subjects that have been studied and written about, sought after avidly, discussed passionately, and even resisted vigorously around the world. Auto racing, Dante, folk music, food, Leonardo da Vinci, films, poetry, religion, striptease, television, and the internet are just some of the topics he examines. In Rome, heads of state kneel before Bernini's statue of Saint Teresa in ecstasy, says Kirby, and so do people who can't read. And everyone watches TV.

Ultra-Talk pays homage to the work of two towering writers and critics. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Giacomo Leopardi both stated that a book was valid only if it had been accepted by both an intellectual elite and a vast public. Kirby would have added a second requirement: that the book's―or cultural monument's―popularity must have traction over time. By standing on the shoulders of Goethe and Leopardi, Kirby offers a way to read, see, and savor a post-theoretical worldview that everybody can share.


Reviews about Ultra-Talk: Johnny Cash, The Mafia, Shakespeare, Drum Music, St. Teresa Of Avila, And 17 Other Colossal Topics Of Conversation (3):
Kifer
so very smart. he's one sly dude and he knows it. he lifts up his subjects and turns them into literature all without ever letting you know cause its just so darn fun to read.
Jox
Most academic criticism is about as much fun as hemorrhoid surgery, and a lot of journalism about serious intellectual topics is pure froth. David Kirby's book succeeds in being both thoughtful and entertaining, and that's a rare accomplishment. Ultimately the real pleasure here is in tagging along on the wanderings (mental, emotional, geographical) of a very interesting, funny, whip-smart teacher. Among my favorite essays is the one on Whitman, in which Kirby manages to range over some well-covered ground in a very fresh and insightful way. I know Whitman's work well, yet I learned from his treatment. Kirby's been reading Montaigne, and it shows: his essays bob and weave delightfully, offering surprise after substantial surprise.
Dilkree
In the introduction to Ultra-Talk, David Kirby writes, "What I offer in these pages is a way to read, see, and savor, a post-theoretical world view that everybody can share." That is a strong assertion, and though this collection of essays covers diverse and interesting ground, Kirby doesn't quite live up to his goal.

Elsewhere in the introduction, the author defines a set of criteria for what is "good": that which "must not only appeal to both the elite and the public...it must also have a track record." This criteria, presumably, sets the stage for the subject matter he will present in this "book of king-sized cultural monuments." It is true that the variety of subjects does not disappoint; from Walt Whitman to Saint Teresa of Avila to Nascar to the reality show Big Brother, Kirby delights with his surprising turns and associative logic. Despite his efforts to speak across racial and class boundaries, however, Kirby succeeds in speaking directly, and only, to white, middle-class, academically-inclined readers.

Most of these compositions are a compelling blend of personal essay and literary or cultural criticism; they manage to both entertain and inform, which is a difficult task. Each essay reaches farther than the typical personal essay--start with a hook-y personal anecdote, then move outward toward some larger truth about life or human nature--and attempts not only to contemplate big questions, but also to educate readers in the process. I found Kirby's explorations of Dante, Whitman, Shakespeare and Dickinson fascinating. But then again, I read those authors extensively during my academic career. Aside from the sporadic, required high school poetry lessons that many teenagers sleep through, most Americans, arguably, have not. By assuming that his reader is well-versed in classic literature, Kirby excludes much of his potential audience.

My point is that Kirby perhaps shoots himself in the foot with the grandiose definition his book presents in the introduction. It's not that this collection of essays is bad. I, as a white, middle-class, academically-inclined person, very much enjoyed Kirby's whimsical yet didactic tone and unique perspective on popular culture. The essay "Why Does It Always Have to Be a Boy Baby" was particularly well-crafted in its refusal both to endorse and to criticize religion, opting instead to examine the intrinsic role religion plays in every person's life, whether or not s/he is a willing participant.

Kirby, a poet and literature professor, is skilled at making intellectual subject matter interesting and accessible. I simply wonder: is his "post-theoretical world view" really one "that everybody can share?"

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