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by Susan Davis,Gina Hyams

  • ISBN: 1594630232
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Susan Davis,Gina Hyams
  • Subcategory: Essays & Correspondence
  • Other formats: mbr rtf docx lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Hudson Street Press; First Printing edition (September 21, 2006)
  • Pages: 320 pages
  • FB2 size: 1418 kb
  • EPUB size: 1146 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 716
Download Searching for Mary Poppins: Women Write About the Intense Relationship Between Mothers and Nannies fb2

Robinson, for instance, recalls the moment she had it all-the handsome husband, the beautiful baby, the stately townhouse, the fabulous job, and the coveted French nanny.

I cannot begin to tell you how much the majority of these essays offended the hell out of me. For one thing, there isn't a single essay written by a nanny; every single one of them is written by a mother.

Susan Davis, Gina Hyams.

News, author interviews, critics' picks and more. A series of essays by twenty-five top women writers explores the dynamic between mothers and nannies as well as the spectrum of emotions experienced by mothers when relinquishing their children to another caregiver, in a volume that includes pieces by Susan Cheever, Joyce Maynard, and Jacquelyn Mitchard.

From Daphne Merkin on the challenges of hiring a nanny after having been raised by one to Lauren Slater on her regret at having  given her mothering away, the collectionÂ's stunningly original pieces offer rare insight into the complex issues that emerge when a mother turns the care of her child. Susan Davis, Gina Hyams.

Gina Hyams, Writer & Photographer. 2007; Hudson Street Press/Penguin . Gina Hyams is the author of The Tanglewood Picnic book and lots of other things as well. Pacific Spas: Luxury Getaways on the West Coast (Chronicle Books, 2006). In a Mexican Garden: Courtyards, Pools, and Open-Air Living Rooms (Chronicle Books, 2005). The Campfire Collection: Thrilling, Chilling Tales of Alien Encounters (Chronicle Books, 2005). Incense: Rituals, Mystery, Lore (Chronicle Books, 2004).

I found the book to be very touching and felt like I could go on reading about the relationships between mother's and nannies forever, it was really interesting to take a glimpse into the lives of these families. I was hoping for a great story about a Brit nanny and mother relationship). I really do recommend that parents and nannies read this fabulous collection of stories.

Susan Davis is Senior Lecturer at Central Queensland University, Australia.

With wit, sensitivity, and unflinching honesty, Searching for Mary Poppins brings together twenty-five of today’s leading woman writers—including Marisa de los Santos, Susan Cheever, Joyce Maynard, and Jacquelyn Mitchard—to explore the emotional minefield of mother-nanny relationships. From Daphne Merkin on the challenges of hiring a nanny after having been raised by one to Lauren Slater on her regret at having “given her mothering away,” the collection’s stunningly original pieces offer rare insight into the complex issues that emerge when a mother turns the care of her child over to a stranger. Raising questions that reach beyond money, race, class, and gender into the darkest areas of love and fear that a mother feels, this book ultimately provides hope, solace, and welcome perspective on this unique relationship.
Reviews about Searching for Mary Poppins: Women Write About the Intense Relationship Between Mothers and Nannies (7):
Ndlaitha
This book wasn't what I expected, and I think it was the subtitle that led me astray. The introduction reset my expectations: it was like an anecdotal how-to for mothers navigating relationships with their nannies. And so it felt one-sided in the way it was apparently supposed to, and I think also in a way it wasn't supposed to.

The subtitle led me to feel that women on BOTH sides of the mother-nanny relationship would be writing, and the introduction clarified that we'd only be hearing from moms. The one-sidedness that could have been avoided: many mothers were work-from-home writers (convenient when looking for someone to contribute to a book), many lived in New York, and many were dealing with navigating race/ethnicity and class as much as they were dealing with with navigating the actual relationship with another human.

It wasn't offensive to me as other reviewers have expressed, but it did feel...askew, unbalanced. I feel that what was an opportunity to really explore the joys and challenges in co-parenting with someone you pay was only partly accomplished, and otherwise lost as writers-who-happen-to-also-be-moms eloquently described their and their nannies' normal human inadequacies.

So, because I reasonably had hoped for more - and while the book was ultimately lovely and I appreciated the stories - there was something missing that could have been incorporated. Thus, my review is missing one star it otherwise would have had.
Winasana
I was eager to read this book when I found it and was absolutely riveted and drawn in by the forward and introduction. The honest and thorough depiction of the Mother/Nanny relationship resonated with many of my experiences. I was a bit taken aback by the vast majority of difficult endings. Many nannies leaving a family with no notice or information as to why. Nannies with secrets, both of their own lives and of how they care for children. Yet through it all, the mothers seemed quite able to be grateful for the good while still not entirely forgiving the bad. This book challenged me to take a long hard look at myself and the career path of being a nanny. I find myself thinking that I am quite different from all of the nannies represented in this book. What would my employers' essays look like? How would they describe my influence in their family? I have had a few jobs end painfully but on the whole, I remain in touch with and on good terms with the families and children I once loved--and quite honestly probably always will love. I recommend this book to the thoughtful reader but fear that to some it might give an unbalanced harsh picture of what having a nanny is like. But perhaps I am not entirely aware of my own experience and would be shocked to discover that my employers have felt similarly about me as many moms in this book did about their nannies. I might not ever know- which leaves me quite unsettled.
Lestony
My daughter needed a nanny. Neither of us knew anything about it. Based on the reviews, I got her this book. I haven't read it myself but years later, my daughter quotes from this book, having forgotten where it came from. She has kept her nanny, who is like a member of the family. When things don't come naturally, a good book can bridge the gap. These insights help on a daily basis. When Amazon put this title on my list of purchases, I ignored it, thinking it was a mistake. I didn't connect Mary Poppins with nanny. Because of this and the fact that I haven't read it, the book gets four stars.
Wenaiand
This book is FABULOUS. I was sad when it ended. It's good for a few reasons: it consists of short stories, so you can read when you only have a few minutes, it brings out the feelings you didn't know you had about having a nanny (besides sometimes guilt), you see life and motherhood from many mom's perspectives, and you find yourself saying, "yes, I know!" to many statements made. It's a great read.
Malanim
I was quite excited to read this book having been a (British) professional nanny for a long time. I found the book to be very touching and felt like I could go on reading about the relationships between mother's and nannies forever, it was really interesting to take a glimpse into the lives of these families. (I was hoping for a great story about a Brit nanny and mother relationship). I really do recommend that parents and nannies read this fabulous collection of stories.
lolike
Much more than a book about nannies. These stories really go to the core of what it is to be a mother and how we all struggle and shine in that roll. Fabulous read.
Welahza
This book contains essays by mothers who have employed nannies (most illegal) in the past. It analyzes the relationship between mothers and nannies and really explores the wealth of emotions that mothers go through. Highly recommeded!

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