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by Aleksander Pushkin,Alfred Hayes

  • ISBN: 1406566594
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Aleksander Pushkin,Alfred Hayes
  • Subcategory: Dramas & Plays
  • Other formats: rtf mbr doc lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Dodo Press (February 8, 2008)
  • Pages: 72 pages
  • FB2 size: 1983 kb
  • EPUB size: 1947 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 914
Download Boris Godunov: A Drama in Verse (Dodo Press) fb2

Pushkin pioneered the use of vernacular speech in his poems and plays. Translated from a play written in verse by Alexander Pushkin, this is the source of Modest Mussorgsky's famous opera of the same name

Pushkin pioneered the use of vernacular speech in his poems and plays. Translated from a play written in verse by Alexander Pushkin, this is the source of Modest Mussorgsky's famous opera of the same name. Those familiar with the opera will find it interesting to compare the two versions, because some of Pushkin's characterizations and plot points were actually altered in libretto of the opera. Both the play and the opera are very famous, especially in Russia. However, both were also extremely controversial in their day, particularly due to the subject, which concerns the overthrow of a Tzar.

By ALEXANDER PUSHKIN. Rendered into English verse by Alfred Hayes. BORIS GODUNOV, afterwards Tsar. Of us, Varyags in blood, there are full many, But ‘tis no easy thing for us to vie With Godunov; the people are not wont To recognise in us an ancient branch Of their old warlike masters; long already Have we our appanages forfeited, Long served but as lieutenants of the tsars, And he hath known, by fear, and love, and glory, How.

Published February 8th 2008 by Dodo Press (first published 1831).

Author: Alexander Pushkin. Translator: Alfred Hayes. This is a splendid play by Pushkin focusing on the dramatic conflict at the beginning of the seventeenth century between Tsar Boris Godunov and the pretender to the throne, the False Dimitri. Release Date: February, 2004. Last Updated: February 7, 2013. He was a young man who claimed to be the Tsarevich Dimitri, youngest son of Ivan the Terrible, and who had died at the age of seven. Release Date: February, 2004 Last Updated: February 7, 2013. By Alexander Pushkin. SEMYON NIKITICH GODUNOV, secret agent of Boris Godunov. GABRIEL PUSHKIN, nephew of A. M. Pushkin. PRINCE SHUISKY, Russian noble. PRINCE VOROTINSKY, Russian noble. PRINCE KURBSKY, disgraced Russian noble. KHRUSHCHOV, disgraced Russian noble.

Novel, novel in verse, poem, drama, short story, fairytale. While under the strict surveillance of the Tsar's political police and unable to publish, Pushkin wrote his most famous play, the drama Boris Godunov. His novel in verse, Eugene Onegin, was serialized between 1825 and 1832. Pushkin was fatally wounded in a duel with his brother-in-law, Georges-Charles de Heeckeren d'Anthès, also known as Dantes-Gekkern, a French officer serving with the Chevalier Guard Regiment, who attempted to seduce the poet's wife, Natalia Pushkina. ATHANASIUS MIKAILOVICH PUSHKIN, friend of Prince Shuisky. FEODOR, young son of Boris Godunov.

This is a splendid play by Pushkin focusing on the dramatic conflict at the beginning of the seventeenth century between Tsar Boris Godunov and the pretender to the throne, the False Dimitri.

Alexander Sergeyevich Poushkin (1799-1837) was a Russian Romantic author who is considered to be the greatest Russian poet and the founder of modern Russian literature. Pushkin pioneered the use of vernacular speech in his poems and plays, creating a style of storytelling-mixing drama, romance, and satire-associated with Russian literature ever since and greatly influencing later Russian writers. Pushkin published his first poem at the age of fifteen, and was widely recognized by the literary establishment by the time of his graduation from the Imperial Lyceum in Tsarskoe Selo. He gradually became committed to social reform and emerged as a spokesman for literary radicals; in the early 1820s he clashed with the government, which sent him into exile in southern Russia. While under the strict surveillance of government censors and unable to travel or publish at will, he wrote his most famous play, the drama Boris Godunov: A Drama in Verse. Critics consider many of his works masterpieces, such as the poem The Bronze Horseman and the drama The Stone Guest. He also wrote The Daughter of the Commandant and Marie: A Story of Russian Love, and The Queen of Spades.
Reviews about Boris Godunov: A Drama in Verse (Dodo Press) (2):
Barinirm
Translated from a play written in verse by Alexander Pushkin, this is the source of Modest Mussorgsky's famous opera of the same name. Those familiar with the opera will find it interesting to compare the two versions, because some of Pushkin's characterizations and plot points were actually altered in libretto of the opera. Both the play and the opera are very famous, especially in Russia. However, both were also extremely controversial in their day, particularly due to the subject, which concerns the overthrow of a Tzar.

The story comes from Russia's "Time of Troubles", somewhat analogous to England's "Wars of the Roses". Both were tumultuous periods in the histories of their respective countries, when the crown changed hands many times, and never seemed to rest securely on anybody's head for very long. Tzar Boris tries to run the country well, but his administration is handicapped by the wide-spread suspicion that he has had the rightful heir-apparent, a young boy, murdered. An ambitious former-monk attempts to pass himself off as that rightful heir-apparent, asserting that he was not murdered after all. Many of Boris' enemies, both foreign and domestic, are willing to believe him.

The story is a bit unsatisfying in that it ends with the overthrow of Tzar Boris, and omits the remainder of the story of the ambitious "Young Pretender". It feels as though the story is unfinished. However, it seems that Pushkin actually did intend to continue this narrative in succeeding works, much as Shakespeare wrote a whole series of plays concerning the succession of English Kings during the "Wars of the Roses". Unfortunately, Pushkin was prevented from completing his project, both by government censers who were not happy with a story about the usurpation of a Tzar's thrown, as well as by the author's premature death in a duel.
Mildorah
I enjoyed this classic Russian tale in preparation for the Met HD production of next week. Reading the literary source is always delightful.

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