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by Patrick White

  • ISBN: 0140186107
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Patrick White
  • Subcategory: Contemporary
  • Other formats: mobi lrf lrf azw
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics (March 2, 1993)
  • Pages: 368 pages
  • FB2 size: 1127 kb
  • EPUB size: 1242 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 328
Download A Fringe of Leaves (Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics) fb2

Patrick White's "A Fringe of Leaves" is exactly that, a historical romance set in Australia in the 1830s, when much of the country was as yet unconquered by its English and Irish settlers, a good number of whom were convicts

Patrick White's "A Fringe of Leaves" is exactly that, a historical romance set in Australia in the 1830s, when much of the country was as yet unconquered by its English and Irish settlers, a good number of whom were convicts. Fringe was first published in 1976, but in many ways it reads as a late-Victorian novel.

A Fringe of Leaves (Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics). Another of Patrick White’s brilliant examinations of the human character, in this case focused on twins, the totally anal Waldo and his ‘half-wit’ brother, Arthur

A Fringe of Leaves (Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics). Another of Patrick White’s brilliant examinations of the human character, in this case focused on twins, the totally anal Waldo and his ‘half-wit’ brother, Arthur. Their mundane lives are examined in detail, from both their perspectives and in part from their acquaintances (Mrs Musto, Mrs Poulter, the Feinsteins).

A Fringe of Leaves book. Published March 2nd 1993 by Penguin Classics (first published 1976)

A Fringe of Leaves book. Published March 2nd 1993 by Penguin Classics (first published 1976). Visits to Oz and a secondhand copy of David Marr's biography put me back on the track, and A Fringe of Leaves was what I picked up.

This is a list of books published as Penguin Classics. In 1996, Penguin Books published as a paperback A Complete Annotated Listing of Penguin Classics and Twentieth-Century Classics (. ISBN 0-14-771090-1). The Absentee by Maria Edgeworth. According to Mark by Penelope Lively. The Acts of King Arthur and His Noble Knights by John Steinbeck. The Actual Saul Bellow.

I admire what White leaves out of his novels. Patricia Morely, one of Patrick White's early critics, wrote that "Out of tension and the many selves came the work that made White the greatest novelist writing in English in the twentieth century. While some might disagree with this assessment, no one could truthfully argue with White's great achievement.

DONALD BARTHELME published seventeen books, including four novels and a prize-winning children’s book

DONALD BARTHELME published seventeen books, including four novels and a prize-winning children’s book. He was a longtime contributor to The New Yorker, winner of a National Book Award, a director of PEN and the Authors Guild, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He died in July 1989. DAVE EGGERS is the author of How We Are Hungry, You Shall Know Your Velocity, and A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, a 2000 finalist for the Pulitzer prize.

Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics Left in the care of the butler, Baines, and his wife, Philip realizes too late the danger of lies and deceit. But the truth is even deadlier.

Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics. In this autobiography, Quentin Crisp describes his unhappy childhood and the stresses of adolescence that led him to London. There in bedsits and cafes he found a world of brutality and comedy, of shortlived jobs and precarious relationships. Studies in Classic American Literature is valuable not only for the light it sheds on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American consciousness, telling 'the truth of the day', but also as a prime example of Lawrence's learning, passion and integrity of judgement. Left in the care of the butler, Baines, and his wife, Philip realizes too late the danger of lies and deceit.

Literary critics see books in this series as important members of the Western canon, though many titles are translated or of non-Western origin; indeed, the series for decades from its creation included only translations, until it eventually incorporated the Penguin English Library imprint in 1986.

Set in Australia in the 1840s, A FRINGE OF LEAVES combines dramatic action with a finely distilled moral vision. Returning home to England from Van Diemen's land, the Bristol Maid is shipwrecked on the Queensland coast and Mrs Roxburgh is taken prisoner by a tribe of aborigines, along with the rest of the passengers and crew. In the course of her escape, she is torn by conflicting loyalties - to her dead husband, to her rescuer, to her own and to her adoptive class. Imprint: Vintage Digital.

Women - Australia - 19th century - Fiction. Shipwrecks - Australia - Fiction. Wilderness survival - Australia - Fiction. Australia - Fiction. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Returning to England in 1840, the "Bristol Maid" is shipwrecked on the Queensland Coast and Mrs Roxburgh is taken prisoner by a tribe of Aborigines. In the course of her escape, she is torn by loyalties - to her dead husband, to her rescuer, to her own and to her adoptive class.
Reviews about A Fringe of Leaves (Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics) (7):
SARAND
Fascinating story of a social and cultural transformation of Ellen Gluyas, simple self-conscious girl of modest rural background, to the high-class Lady Roxburgh, Ellen's high moral qualities and an almost incredible adaptability to the most brutal conditions promote her to a true woman-hero.
Tuliancel
I love the way PW with the help of very few words describes a person, a relationship and a situation.
WUNDERKIND
What riper themes for a 'historical' novel? Patrick White's "A Fringe of Leaves" is exactly that, a historical romance set in Australia in the 1830s, when much of the country was as yet unconquered by its English and Irish settlers, a good number of whom were convicts. Fringe was first published in 1976, but in many ways it reads as a late-Victorian novel. There's a tremendous amount of Thomas Hardy about it, in subject matter, in narrative structure, and in its bitter-to-bittersweet outlook on humankind. The central tale of romance, between a strong-bodied young woman and a bookish older man, has echoes of George Eliot's Middlemarch -- intentional, I think -- and the survival tale that emerges as the second half of the novel, after a shipwreck, reminds me inexorably of Joseph Conrad. Then, when the heroine is 'adopted' unwillingly into non-European culture, I can't help thinking of E. M. Forster's "Passage to India". Forster's and White's uneasy attitudes toward erotic encounters are of a kind.

But Patrick White was his own man as a writer, and had his own very recognizable narrative voice. He mixed crisply evocative scenic descriptions with almost parenthetical wit and irony. His persistent tone of surly superciliousness toward his own characters,his creatures of imagination, may require a breaking-in period for many readers. I was strongly 'put off' by it when I read "Voss", my first encounter with White. However, in "Fringe of Leaves" the author created a compelling female character, Ellen Roxburgh, of more persuasive reality than almost any other heroine in fiction portrayed by authors of any gender persuasion. Mrs. Roxburgh is the survivor, and the horrors she survives would seem impossible except that they are utterly true to history, very similar to the accounts of the sufferings of the real-life American Captain James Riley, a shipwreck castaway enslaved by Bedouins in the Sahara in the early 1800s.

As I've already suggested, this is a novel with two halves -- the first a story of love and guilt among the Anglophone settlers, and the second a grueling narrative of captivity and escape -- but the two halves are jointed together masterfully by a shipwreck scene worthy of Conrad or Melville. And then there's an ending... the most unexpected, puzzling, ironic ending/non-ending one could ask for, the kind of ending that first makes you want to heave the book into the surf but then compels you to acknowledge it as the only thing plausible.

This is a "page-turner", whatever other impression of difficult earnestness I may have suggested. It would be possible, for a less compulsively analytic reader, to 'go with the flow' of passions and pangs, and to read "A Fringe of Leaves" as a flaming romance. Whatever sort of reader you are, give it a shot! It's perhaps the best 19th Century novel written in our lifetimes.
Adoranin
Mrs Roxburgh and her husband set sail for England from Austrailia. The Bristol Maid is shipwrecked and she is taken prisoner by cannibilistic aborigines...
On one level this is a first rate adventure story of love, betrayal, capture and escape. But such is the power of Patrick White-and as with his other great works-this is also a brilliant exploration of man-the beast-and the nature he is bound by. White appals the reader with the manner in which the aboriginals enslave and treat Ellen Roxburgh,but deftly illustrates that no matter what cultural angle we take or live by,they are all just a veneer over our true savage selves. If the aboriginal customs and rites that guide their lives shock civilized sensibilities,what so about civilization that has enslaved men and women in a brutal penal colony,stringing up the bodies of captured bolters 'as a warning to the rest'?. Yes its covered up with aesthetics and manners,but it is still as savage as any 'primitive' culture. This is a truly great piece of work.
White writes in meticulous detail, so vivid that it conjures pictures in the mind that forever will remind you of the story.
It is impossible to say what serves as Whites masterpiece as his great novels-'Voss' 'Tree of Man' 'Riders in the Chariot' 'Solid Mandala' and 'A Fringe of Leaves' are all so superbly of a high standard that maybe only his collected works in one volume could be considered as such. A true nobel writer.
Mr_Mix
There is a touch of the chaos in Fringe of Leaves. It is not boring and it is one of White's better novels. It has a good story and I will not reveal the plot beyond what the publisher reveals on the book jacket.

I have read three of White's novels: the present work, the Tree of Man, and Voss. The present novel, is more complex than Voss, and unlike Voss here the author manages to breath some life into the characters. It has a good plot that reminds one a bit of Jane Eyre, but with quite a different setting. It is set in England in the middle of the 19th century. It is about a young woman from Cornwall who marries a wealthy gentleman. They go to Australia and are caught in a ship wreck off the coast of Queensland after visiting the husband's brother in Tasmania.

White uses stream of consciousness in a mild form which seems a bit novel after reading Voss. But the thing that grabs your attention is his use of structure. He introduces the protagonist, Ellen, by having two ladies describe her for about 20 pages. The two women ride in a horse drawn carriage chatting about Ellen. You, as the reader, realize that White will be creative in what will follow in the story.

After that we move the present scene in the story. But Ellen has these flashbacks to fill in the story of her life over most of the first half.

Patrick White gained fame as the Australian Nobel prize winner in literature and as a person with a prickly or difficult personality. He was educated at Cambridge but settled and wrote in Australia after World War II. He wrote about a dozen novels and a biography.

This is a good novel and it deserves 5 stars. After a dozen pages or so it becomes clear to the reader why White is famous: he has an unusual style and he is a gifted writer. There is no question about his writing ability. We see great writing ability in Voss and that skill is present in The Tree of Man and in the present novel.

Overall, I thought it was a good book and an interesting read and an interesting book to read if you are interested in the works of Patrick White.

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