» » The Shadow Boxer

Download The Shadow Boxer fb2

by Steven Heighton

  • ISBN: 1862074178
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Steven Heighton
  • Subcategory: Contemporary
  • Other formats: lrf azw rtf docx
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Granta Books; New Ed edition (2001)
  • Pages: 320 pages
  • FB2 size: 1348 kb
  • EPUB size: 1272 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 385
Download The Shadow Boxer fb2

Steven Heighton is already recognized as one of the best writers to come to the fore in the nineties, a winner of numerous literary awards, whose work is widely translated.

Steven Heighton is already recognized as one of the best writers to come to the fore in the nineties, a winner of numerous literary awards, whose work is widely translated. In The Shadow Boxer, he delivers a stunning portrait of the artist in the tradition of such great tales as Jude the Obscure, Candide and even Don Quixote, and gives literary life to the Northern Ontario landscape of "the Soo", and the demanding, muscular life of Lake Superior where giant ore-barges make their way over the grave of The Edmund Fitzgerald.

The Shadow Boxer book.

The shadow boxer : a novel. by. Heighton, Steven, 1961-. Boxers (Sports), Poets. Boston : Houghton Mifflin. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. t on September 21, 2011.

The first part of this is difficult and slow as the narrative jumps back and forward in time but do persevere - there is a good story in there and the last part is a riveting 'unputdownable' depiction of man against the elements. Find similar books Profile. In the meantime, if you know any books with non-binary main characters you think we should include, please let us know. Success against the odds.

Turbulent and old-fashioned, in a good way. By Thriftbooks. com User, June 3, 2004. Steven Heighton's book is like something written in the 1940s, with all the passion, turmoil and poetry of that era. It's hard to recconcile this overwhelming impression with the chronology of the storyline that places the action in a different era.

Heighton sensitively portrays the relationship between father and son, the unspoken bond that is severed only by the broken man's death

Heighton sensitively portrays the relationship between father and son, the unspoken bond that is severed only by the broken man's death. Spurred on to the bright lights of the city, Sev begins his career as a writer, joins the literati and falls in love. Heighton captures perfectly the everyday events that shape Sev's new identity, as old experiences must inform and shape the new. As this shifting and unstable life begins to disintegrate he retreats to a small and remote island on the Lake.

Steven Heighton is a Canadian novelist, short story writer and poet. He is the author of fourteen books, including three short story collections, four novels and six poetry collections. His most recent book, the novel The Nightingale Won't Let You Sleep, was published in 2017. Heighton was born in Toronto, Ontario, and grew up there and in Red Lake, in northern Ontario.

com's Steven Heighton Page and shop for all Steven Heighton books. Books by Steven Heighton. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Steven Heighton. The book is in pre-production for film. Heighton's debut novel,

Steven Heighton is already recognized as one of the best writers to come to the fore in the nineties, a winner of. .A passionate love story, a gripping narrative, The Shadow Boxer is also about the power of dreams and regret. It heralds a major new Canadian novelist and a master storyteller.

Steven Heighton is already recognized as one of the best writers to come to the fore in the nineties, a winner of numero.


Reviews about The Shadow Boxer (5):
ME
Boats, books and boxing. Steven Heighton's debut combines three of my favorite things. How could it miss?! Young Sevigne Torrins comes from a line of pugilist sailormen, self-taught intellectuals with a love for the Sweet Science (that's punching people in the face). He grows up on the Canadian side of Lake Superior -- the Soo -- boxing and playing literary "name that reference" games with his Hemingway-esque father. After Torrins Sr.'s boozing splits the family apart, Sevigne stays with his dad on the banks of the lake while his mother and older brother start a new life and family in Cairo.

When he's not belting it out in amateur boxing bouts (I thought Canadians just did hockey), Sevigne dreams of becoming a great writer, feverishly dashing off poems to arts publications. No surprise, Heighton also started his literary life as a poet, so he waxes a lot about the search for transcendence or some such jazz. But brother, can the guy write about boxing. Like a boxer himself, Heighton varies his verbal attack, writing in short, choppy, fragmentary jabs, then unleashing a torrent of words in great haymaker paragraphs that run for a page or more.

After his father's death, Sevigne, in his mid-20s, sets out for the big city -- Toronto!!! -- to make his fortune as a novelist. He hooks up with Eddy, a friend from high school, who has big plans to start a radical and revolutionary literary magazine (tho he can't settle on a name for it that's sufficiently radical and revolutionary). Eddy's prone to saying things like "Nobody knows what postmodern means -- that's what's so postmodern about the term!" Eddy gets Sevigne a job writing pithy but shallow capsule reviews of great novels (which is absolutely NOTHING like what I do here on Amazon, just so we're all clear). Sevigne finds the arts scene in Toronto is less about art than catty gossip, fashionable drugs and fashionable fashions and being seen at all the hippest clubs. Still, hot sex with poet babes can make living with trendoid ayholes tolerable.

I much preferred the first half of "The Shadow Boxer" to the second. The scenes of Sevigne frustratedly watching his father's daily disintegration felt more genuine and honest than his trip to the big city. In the second half of the book, Heighton's prose turns precious, his metaphors labored as Sevigne guzzles down gallons of rye to dull the pain of being artistic or something. Other than its Canadian origin, there's not a lot to set "The Shadow Boxer" dramatically apart from thousands of other wandering-youth novels in the tradition of the Jacks, London and Kerouac. Of course it's pretentious. It's meant to be. Young men aspiring to literary lionhood are supposed to be pretentious. But it's pretentious without being insufferable. On the face of it, this sounds like a stupid statement, but "The Shadow Boxer" is a book for readers. Not in the sense of "pick up a paperback before a plane trip to kill time for a couple chapters before falling asleep," but for READERS: people with an honest passion about books, who pick apart sentences and peer at the mechanics, who value the power of words and what they can accomplish. It's a book in love with literature and language, at times in opposition to good sense and restraint. It's not exactly a good novel, and parts of it are outright bad, but it works so hard, it's so damn determined to be meaningful, that I couldn't find it in my heart to be cruel to it. It's a poopin-on-the-carpet puppydog of a book by an author who's likely to find something more interesting to say now that he's got this out of his system.
Tetaian
Steven Heighton's book is like something written in the 1940s, with all the passion, turmoil and poetry of that era. It's hard to recconcile this overwhelming impression with the chronology of the storyline that places the action in a different era. I wish Otto Preminger were still around, it would take a film-maker of his magnitude, unafraid of the corny and the obvious, to tackle this novel and whip it into a sprawling film. Heighton is loaded with talent and the relationship between Sevigne Torrins and his father is magnificently drawn. Like Michael Ondaatje, Heighton is a Canadian poet of repute but the parallels stop there. I liked "The Shadow Boxer" a lot and I wonder why it wasn't more of a success in the USA. Indeed I wonder how it did in Canada, where it might be considered a book sort of in the vein of Leonard Cohen's turbulent novel "Beautiful Losers" from the 1960s.
Stan
I went back and forth in my opinion of this book as I read, and had to force myself to keep reading several times. Which is strange since I really enjoyed the story. I thought the characters were great for the most part, but for a hint of the I'm a oh so soulful artist type becoming annoying at times. But it's always nice in this type of fiction to find some outdorsey "manly" type male characters. Very Hemingwaysesque. But what made reading this seem like a chore at times is the style. Very lyrical, really too much for the story. I understand the author is a poet and that doesn't surprise me having read this. The style would probably work well in a collection of short stories, but here it is just too much and he probably should have toned it down a little.
Vudogal
Great impression I got since first pages of this surprising and eminent work of Steven Highton an author still unknown for me. The history, the atmosphere, the rithm and superb quality of writing has touched and troubled me. I found in this book the remote and always powerful world of images, sounds and architecture I received when I met the great authors of universal literature of all the times. I even was obliged to stop some times the reading because of the excessive charge of emotion and toughts the book comunicates with the strenght of an immense river. The Shadow Boxer has been a capital experience I wouln't hope to meet again in a young author og these days and I recommend this book to everyone is looking to find in books the supreme and rare deed of beauty and truth. Hoping Steven Highton will come to Italy and meet his italian readers.
Feri
I bought this book because the title intrigued me and the opening paragraphs were well written. I wish I hadn't bothered. A novel that showed promise quickly degenerated into a self absorbed whine of the I'm-such-a-poor-misunderstood-artist type. My advise -- skip this one.

Related to The Shadow Boxer fb2 books: