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by Thomas Malory

  • ISBN: 1434614727
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Thomas Malory
  • Subcategory: Contemporary
  • Other formats: txt rtf doc lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: BiblioBazaar (June 2, 2007)
  • Pages: 560 pages
  • FB2 size: 1382 kb
  • EPUB size: 1322 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 739
Download Le Mort d'Arthur Volume 1 fb2

Le Morte d’Arthur, Vol. 1 (Chap. Chapter I. How Uther Pendragon sent for the duke of Cornwall and Igraine his wife, and of their departing suddenly again.

Le Morte d’Arthur, Vol. IT befell in the days of Uther Pendragon, when he was king of all England, and so reigned, that there was a mighty duke in Cornwall that held war against him long time. And the duke was called the Duke of Tintagil. And so by means King Uther sent for this duke, charging him to bring his wife with him, for she was called a fair lady, and a passing wise, and her name was called Igraine.

King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table. Bibliographical note. Preface of william caxton. Book I. First, How Uther Pendragon sent for the duke of Cornwall and Igraine his wife, and of their departing suddenly again. CHAPTER II. How Uther Pendragon made war on the duke of Cornwall, and how by the mean of Merlin he lay by the duchess and gat Arthur. CHAPTER III. Of the birth of King Arthur and of his nurture.

standard or slim CD case insert. Download M4B Part 1 (144MB). The book contains some of Malory's own original material (the Gareth story) and retells the older stories in light of Malory's own views and interpretations.

Le Morte d'Arthur (originally spelled Le Morte Darthur, Middle French for "The Death of Arthur") is a reworking by Sir Thomas Malory of existing tales about the legendary King Arthur, Guinevere, Lancelot, Merlin and the Knights of the.

Le Morte d'Arthur (originally spelled Le Morte Darthur, Middle French for "The Death of Arthur") is a reworking by Sir Thomas Malory of existing tales about the legendary King Arthur, Guinevere, Lancelot, Merlin and the Knights of the Round Table. Malory interpreted existing French and English stories about these figures and added original material (.

Le Morte d'Arthur (originally spelled Le Morte Darthur, Middle French for "the death of Arthur") is a reworking of existing tales by Sir Thomas Malory about the legendary King Arthur, Guinevere, Lancelot, Merlin.

Le Morte d'Arthur (originally spelled Le Morte Darthur, Middle French for "the death of Arthur") is a reworking of existing tales by Sir Thomas Malory about the legendary King Arthur, Guinevere, Lancelot, Merlin, and the Knights of the Round Table. Malory interprets existing French and English stories about these figures and adds original material (.

LibriVox recording of Le Morte d'Arthur, by Sir Thomas Malory. I.

Many modern Arthurian writers have used Malory as their source, including T. H. White for his popular The Once and Future King. First Page: Le morte D'arthur. By Sir Thomas Malory. King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table. Vol.

Volume two of Le Morte D'Arthur, Sir Thomas Malory's powerful and elegaic version of the Arthurian legend, recounts the adventures of Sir Tristram de Liones and the treachery of Sir Mordred, and follows Sir Launcelot's quest for The Holy Grail, his fatally divided loyalties, and his great.

Volume two of Le Morte D'Arthur, Sir Thomas Malory's powerful and elegaic version of the Arthurian legend, recounts the adventures of Sir Tristram de Liones and the treachery of Sir Mordred, and follows Sir Launcelot's quest for The Holy Grail, his fatally divided loyalties, and his great, forbidden love for the beautiful Queen Guenever.

Malory wrote the book while in prison for various crimes (real or imagined) . Thomas Malory is imprisoned at Newgate where he writes Le Morte D'Arthur.

Malory wrote the book while in prison for various crimes (real or imagined), completing it in 1469 CE. He was released in early 1470 CE and died the following year. Malory’s title for his work was The Whole Book of King Arthur and of His Noble Knights of the Round Table but when the book was published by William Caxton in 1485 CE, Caxton mistook the title of the last chapter (Le Morte D’Arthur The Death of Arthur) for that of the book. Once published, the book became popular reading and the name stuck. 1485 CE. William Caxton publishes Le Morte D'Arthur.

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. This text refers to the Bibliobazaar edition.
Reviews about Le Mort d'Arthur Volume 1 (7):
Alsardin
Keith Baines' re-typing of the classic Le Morte D'Arthur originally by Sir Thomas Malory entirely transforms the reading of this story from nearly unbearable (due to the old English words and spelling) and painful into an easy to read and awesome telling of the legend of King Arthur. The reason I bought this book is because I am taking a 3-credit course called Introduction to Arthurian Legend, and our first reading was this book but in old style English. I tried and tried to learn and adapt to the style and learn those old words that we don't use anymore, but I just came up frustrated with it and lacking understanding of what I was reading. In search of a modern language version that holds the integrity of the original story and structure, I found Keith Baines' rendition, and what a lifesaver it was. I was about to drop the whole class, but his book not only made the reading more understandable but so much more enjoyable to read. And not only that, the amount of reading is very noticeably reduced in length because all the ye's and thy's were cut out entirely. You can get all the information in 20 pages in this book that would've taken you 30+ pages in the original old-English version. I've taken a few exams, using this book instead of the original, and I have got 90% or more on each test, so it is an accurate retelling. One thing I did notice about Keith Baines' version compared to the older text is: In Book 4, Chapter 25 of the original text, there are FOUR sons that Sir Marhaus fights, but in Baines' rendition there are SIX sons. But that is the only detail that I have noticed that is different.

If you don't like Old English reading but want to read about the legend of King Arthur -- BUY this book, you will not be disappointed.
Malann
If you are interested in Welsh myths and legends, or tales related to Arthur and Merlin, or even just the roots of classic fantasy, you have probably encountered some reference to Sir Thomas Malory's "Le Morte d'Arthur". I've been aware of it for years; from time to time I've owned and lost or misplaced yard sale paperback copies of it. But I'd never actually gotten around to reading it. Well, if you're in that boat, or just curious, this is an excellent free, well formatted, readable and navigable Kindle copy.

This version has been issued in two volumes, which are currently available as two separate Kindle freebie downloads. (Volume 1 and Volume 2. Volume 1 has the first nine "books" and Volume 2 has the remaining "books". ) Volume 1 opens with an excellent introduction by A. W. Pollard addressing the book's authorship and history. It also contains the original preface by William Caxton, who, in 1469, was the original printer of the book. This set of volumes contains all of the original books and chapters, as edited and mauled by Caxton in his rush to produce the book, except that spelling and some grammar has been updated. Just from the point of view of its convenience, readability and accessibility this is a righteous freebie find.

But, is it worth actually downloading and reading? I surprised myself by concluding that it is. This book is the source of all of the stories that we think we know about Arthur. (From the sword in the stone, on.) Scholars continue to argue about whether there was an Arthur at all, and if so if he was more than just a local Briton chieftain, but while that is a fascinating question for scholars and historians, (see, for example, this excellent treatment: Worlds of Arthur: Facts and Fictions of the Dark Ages),to me that has little or no bearing on the joys of "Le Mort d'Arthur". The Arthur stories are an essential foundation to almost all classic British and, by extension American, high fantasy. Even though most of it was recycled from fancy pants old French versions of even older Welsh stories, Arthur must be reckoned with.

And these stories are a hoot. I didn't read them closely and with an academic's eye. Heck, I skimmed some parts. But there is depth and feeling here. These stories are more gripping, more stirring, and more immediate than the Disnefied versions would suggest. These are well-imagined and well-told tales of honor and bravery and sacrifice, with real style and substance.

So, if you are so inclined, and if you've ever wondered a bit about the Arthur phenomenon, this is a convenient, cheap and painless way to deepen your understanding and reward your effort. Can't ask much more than that from a Kindle freebie.
Daiktilar
Thomas Malory's Le Morte D'Arthur (King Arthur, et al, tales) was an early influence on John Steinbeck. For that reason alone you should read it. And on a more personal level, my grandmother read these tales to me when I was just a small boy. While she sits in her easy chair, light casting the shadow of the book on me, I uncross my legs and stretch out on the floor beside her chair and finally drift into dream. The King Arthur stories are told in many variations and you probably already know some of the stories. Get the real thing; read it to your children; read it to your grandchildren. This is the kind of memory that will stay with them and will probably be repeated over and over to generations of children yet unborn.
Ishnjurus
It's a classic for a reason. Terrific early English history with lovely ancient romantic language. I put off reading it for decades, and I'm glad to be reading it at last.
Kardana
This is a reprint of the very first published King Arthur legend and it is very difficult to read. The spelling has been modernized but the grammar and prose have not. I couldn't get more than a quarter of the way into this thing.
You would have to be a real King Arthur nut to be willing to put your self thru the headache of trying to make since of this thing.
On the other hand it was free, so there isn't any real risk.
blodrayne
Malory's prison-written tales are always a hell of a thing to get through, but also incredibly worth reading. If you don't mind twenty pages about what knight rode what horse (and the lineage of the steed), and what the baker went through to cook that night's feast and every origin of the ingredient. Sort of like GRRM.

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