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by Thomas Hardy

  • ISBN: 1406943746
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Thomas Hardy
  • Subcategory: Classics
  • Other formats: lrf docx mbr rtf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Hard Press (November 3, 2006)
  • Pages: 310 pages
  • FB2 size: 1679 kb
  • EPUB size: 1579 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 308
Download The Woodlanders fb2

The Woodlanders book. The De-fanging of Menfolk: "The Woodlanders" by Thomas Hardy. Another Hardy character to rival Sue Bridehead in emotional complexity is, I feel, Grace Melbury in The Woodlanders.

The Woodlanders book.

The Woodlanders is a novel by Thomas Hardy. It was serialised from May 1886 to April 1887 in Macmillan's Magazine and published in three volumes in 1887. It is one of his series of Wessex novels. The story takes place in a small woodland village called Little Hintock, and concerns the efforts of an honest woodsman, Giles Winterborne, to marry his childhood sweetheart, Grace Melbury.

Home Thomas Hardy The Woodlanders. He'll come down upon us and squat us dead; andwhat will ye do when the life on your property is taken away?"

Home Thomas Hardy The Woodlanders. The woodlanders, . 4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49. CHAPTER XIII. He'll come down upon us and squat us dead; andwhat will ye do when the life on your property is taken away?" "Never you mind me-that's of no consequence," said Giles. Think ofyourself alone.

CHAPTER I. The rambler who, for old association or other reasons, should trace theforsaken coach-road running almost in a meridional line from Bristol tothe south shore of England, would find himself during the latter halfof his journey in the vicinity of some extensive woodlands,interspersed with apple-orchards. They listened to his conversation, but Mr. Percombe, though he hadnodded and spoken genially, seemed indisposed to gratify the curiositywhich he had aroused; and the unrestrained flow of ideas which hadanimated the inside of the van before his arrival was.

The Woodlanders is a much gentler introduction. From the very first words to the final sentence this novel will pull you into Thomas Hardy's world - every description of the woods, town and people will make you almost be able to feel and smell what he describes. The story alternates between happy and sad but never fails to make you feel the emotions Hardy portrays - I really came to care about the characters and their lives and aspirations.

Thomas Hardy The Woodlanders. CHAPTER I. The rambler who, for old association or other reasons, should trace the forsaken coach-road running almost in a meridional line from Bristol to the south shore of England, would find himself during the latter half of his journey in the vicinity of some extensive woodlands, interspersed with apple-orchards. Percombe, though he had nodded and spoken genially, seemed indisposed to gratify the curiosity which he had aroused; and the unrestrained flow of ideas which had animated the inside of the van before his arrival was checked thenceforward.

Plot: This time "Hardy country" is Little Hintock, an isolated and claustrophobic woodland community. George Melbury's daughter Grace is promised in marriage to Giles Winterbourne, a stolid timber merchant who is faithfully devoted to her; but Giles is adored by Marty South, a young girl who does odd jobs with logs. Plot: This time "Hardy country" is Little Hintock, an isolated and claustrophobic woodland community.

Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb.

Thomas Hardy You can read The Woodlanders: a Novel by Thomas Hardy in our library for absolutely free. Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader.

The Woodlanders, novel by Thomas Hardy, published serially in Macmillan’s Magazine from 1886 to 1887 and in book form in 1887. The work is a pessimistic attack on a society that values high status and socially sanctioned behaviour over good character and honest emotions. The story begins as Grace.


Reviews about The Woodlanders (7):
Manarius
I was quite miffed when this book arrived! it's big - about 8 1/2" x 11" and the typeface is huge, like 18 or 24 point! There's no copy rite or anything about the printer, like it's public domain. But it seems to be copied true to Hardy's original (though I have never seen an original) and the story and Hardy's writing is super enchanting-delightful, tho somewhat difficult to read - I have to go over some paragraphs 2 or 3 times because it was written around 1800 and it's old English - like from the England countryside - and kinda poetic.
I highly recommend the story, though there may be a better copy of the book for most people.
Elizabeth
This is one of the two Hardy novels I had yet to read - only one now, "Two on a Tower" - and it is indeed vintage Hardy in its bleakness concerning the constancy of love between the sexes, and also of the Wessex woodlands themselves, exuding such a strong presence herein that it is quite right, after a fashion, to call these eponymous copses and brakes the main character of the novel. But I have two primary objections to the claims of reviewers and commentators on this book:

1.) The book is not for the beginning Hardy reader----Why ever not? It seems perfect to me in this respect. Would you rather have a Hardy neophyte start with "Jude the Obscure," wherein Hardy's bleak vision is so terribly and perfectly executed as to leave one despairing for days? The Woodlanders is a much gentler introduction.

2.) The character of Fitzpiers in this novel is unmitigatedly loathsome---Really? To say this of the Shelley-quoting, philandering doctor amounts to saying this of Hardy himself, for whom Shelley was his mentor, and whose many dalliances led to all manner of marital strife throughout his long years. No, Fitzpiers is of the same mould as the rest of the characters: A pawn of fate. To disparage him is to side, in part, with what Hardy despised: Conventional morality.

I shan't go into the plot too much here, as that seems to me for the reader to uncover and enjoy without my aid. But I will quote Hardy on the milieu of the woodlands to give fair warning of the world one enters, one in which every character's dearest loves and noblest intentions are humbled or devastated:

"Here, as everywhere, the Unfulfilled Intention, which makes life what it is, was as obvious as it could be among the depraved crowds of a city slum. The leaf was deformed, the curve was crippled, the taper was interrupted; the lichen ate the vigour of the stalk, and the ivy slowly strangled to death the promising sapling."

But, the plot and the characters form an engrossing read, and make for rich, introspective reflection. Just don't expect too much cheer. As Hardy's alter ego, Fitzpiers puts it: "Such miserable creatures of circumstance are we all!"
CrazyDemon
It's always great to go back to Thomas Hardy. The settings and the characters, and his writing are beyond compare.
Mr_KiLLaURa
From the very first words to the final sentence this novel will pull you into Thomas Hardy's world - every description of the woods, town and people will make you almost be able to feel and smell what he describes. The story alternates between happy and sad but never fails to make you feel the emotions Hardy portrays - I really came to care about the characters and their lives and aspirations. When Hardy describes the moonlight or the smoke filled woods it really transported me exactly to the time and place - wonderfully written - a Hardy masterpiece!
Inabel
I do not write reviews, but it was a fantastic read.
Dilkree
I am a devoted Thomas Hardy fan, and I love all of his books, and I've read most of them more than once. Once you get used to the language he does not disappoint!
Landaron
First of all, Hardy's prose is gorgeous. It's one of the few novels I can think of in which longer, descriptive passages of nature do not bore me to death. In fact, as others have said here, nature is one of the key protagonists of the story.

In this beautiful setting, the moral conflicts of the human heart play out with venom and ugliness. This obvious contrast makes for a heart-pounding and sublime reading experience. This is a masterpiece of English literature not to be missed.
Never read this particular Hardy book, but once I saw the film I had to read the book. Of course, I wish it had turned out differently.

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