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by Michael Crichton

  • ISBN: 0007350007
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Michael Crichton
  • Subcategory: Action & Adventure
  • Other formats: rtf lrf mbr docx
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harper (April 1, 2012)
  • Pages: 560 pages
  • FB2 size: 1785 kb
  • EPUB size: 1562 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 150
Download Micro. Michael Crichton and Richard Preston fb2

John Michael Crichton (/ˈkraɪtən/; October 23, 1942 – November 4, 2008) was an American author, screenwriter, and film director and producer. His books have sold over 200 million copies worldwide, and over a dozen have been adapted into films

John Michael Crichton (/ˈkraɪtən/; October 23, 1942 – November 4, 2008) was an American author, screenwriter, and film director and producer. His books have sold over 200 million copies worldwide, and over a dozen have been adapted into films. His literary works are usually within the science fiction, techno-thriller, and medical fiction genres, and heavily feature technology.

Michael Crichton (1942-2008) was the author of the groundbreaking novels The Andromeda Strain, The Great Train Robbery . I went into 'Micro' knowing full well that Michael Crichton left a draft manuscript on his computer, and that it was Richard Preston who filled in the story

Michael Crichton (1942-2008) was the author of the groundbreaking novels The Andromeda Strain, The Great Train Robbery, Jurassic Park, Disclosure, Prey, State of Fear, and Next, among many others. I went into 'Micro' knowing full well that Michael Crichton left a draft manuscript on his computer, and that it was Richard Preston who filled in the story. If you go in knowing that, you can set your expectations properly. STORY - The story of Micro is high-concept: a Rated-R version of 'Honey, I Shrunk The Kids.

Michael Crichton and Richard Preston. Minute Creatures swarm around u. bjects of potentially endless study and admiration, if we are willing to sweep our vision down from the world lined by the horizon to include the world an arm’s length away. Ideally, by spending some time in a rain forest-those vast, uncomfortable, alarming, and beautiful environments that so quickly knock our preconceptions aside. The Seven Graduate Students.

We spotlight the book Micro by Michael Crichton and Richard Preston including newly revealed content from The Official Michael . An instant classic, Micro pits nature against technology in vintage Crichton fashion.

We spotlight the book Micro by Michael Crichton and Richard Preston including newly revealed content from The Official Michael Crichton Archives. This boundary-pushing thriller melds scientific fact with pulse-pounding fiction to create yet another masterpiece of sophisticated, cutting-edge entertainment.

Now, in Micro, Michael Crichton reveals a universe too small to see and too dangerous to ignore. In a locked Honolulu office building, three men are found dead with no sign of struggle except for the ultrafine, razor-sharp cuts covering their bodies. The only clue left behind is a tiny bladed robot, nearly invisible to the human eye. In the lush forests of Oahu, groundbreaking technology has ushered in a revolutionary era of biological prospecting. A lifetime can be spent in a Magellanic voyage around the trunk of a tree.

There will be a temptation to compare Micro to Prey, Do you believe in redemption? We often abandon authors once they disappoint us, and Michael Crichton never really found his way again after 1990's Jurassic Park. In fact, in his later works Crichton seemed to spiral out of control, so I'd more or less given up on him. And I don't think I was the only one. Thankfully, Crichton's new book Micro could easily be adapted for film,.

An instant classic, Micro pits nature against technology in vintage Michael Crichton fashion. Completed by visionary science writer Richard Preston, this boundary-pushing thriller melds scientific fact with pulse-pounding fiction to create yet another masterpiece of sophisticated, cutting-edge entertainment. Thriller & Crime Sci-fi & Fantasy Technothriller.

Crichton and Preston love the natural world ( They were young scientists and the micro-world revealed a wonderland .

Crichton and Preston love the natural world ( They were young scientists and the micro-world revealed a wonderland of unknown life ), but they also know it is bloody in tooth and claw. Micro: A Novel" by Michael Crichton and Richard Preston (Harper). On a more realistic note, Crichton has his villain promising to supply our government with lethal micro-drones that could kill any leader on Earth; there’s little reason to doubt such weapons are on the drawing board. All in all, let’s call Micro a mixed bag - sometimes silly, sometimes scary - that will probably find millions of readers.

An instant classic in the vein of Jurassic Park, this boundary-pushing novel has all the hallmarks of Michael Crichton's greatest adventures with its combination of pulse-pounding thrills, cutting-edge technology, and extraordinary research Three men are found dead in a locked second-floor office in Honolulu. There is no sign of struggle, though their bodies are covered in ultra-fine, razor-sharp cuts. With no evidence, the police dismiss it as a bizarre suicide pact. But the murder weapon is still in the room, almost invisible to the human eye. In Cambridge, Massachusetts, seven graduate students at the forefront of their fields are recruited by a pioneering microbiology start-up company. Nanigen MicroTechnologies sends them to a mysterious laboratory in Hawaii, where they are promised access to tools that will open up a whole new scientific frontier. But this opportunity of a lifetime will teach them the true cost of existing at the cutting-edge... The group becomes prey to a technology of radical, unimaginable power and is thrust out into the teeming rainforest. Armed only with their knowledge of the natural world, the young scientists face a hostile wilderness that threatens danger at every turn. To survive, they must harness the awe-inspiring creative - and destructive - forces of nature itself.
Reviews about Micro. Michael Crichton and Richard Preston (7):
POFOD
I went into 'Micro' knowing full well that Michael Crichton left a draft manuscript on his computer, and that it was Richard Preston who filled in the story. If you go in knowing that, you can set your expectations properly.

— STORY —
The story of Micro is high-concept: a Rated-R version of 'Honey, I Shrunk The Kids.' What would happen if you took that old movie, kept the adventure, but had very serious consequences? That's Micro. After a mysterious introduction to hook you in, Micro follows the story of seven scientists with various specialties relating to the fields of biology. They are recruited as potential job candidates by a big corporation when something happens, and they are stuck as shrunken people. Using their brains, they have to work together with their specialized knowledge to escape the harrowing real world of Mother Nature.

The concept of shrunken people is a big stretch but go with it. This book explores that concept as realistically as possible, with Michael Crichton bringing some real world science to help sell it.

— DRAFT —
Knowing that this was still in draft mode, I'm sure Crichton still had a lot of research to do to explain and convince us of certain plot elements. Because of this, the story is not as fully detailed as a typical Crichton book. I think Richard Preston did his best to translate and get across what I can only assume were ideas that were still in development.

The writing and dialogue seemed... simplistic. I think I'm not the only one with this opinion. It reads very high school. I'm not sure if this was because it was rushed, or because they wanted the writing at a level that would reach a larger audience. In any case, I'm just glad that we got one more Michael Crichton book.

— SUMMARY —
If you want a fun adventure story, Micro is for you. The book reads almost like a screenplay, and I could already imagine the soon-to-be-released DreamWorks film. Recommended.
Jia
From giant dinosaurs to killer robots smaller than a flea, Crichton covered the entire gamut. Michael Crichton died with this novel unfinished, and Richard Preston was selected to complete the novel. Most of Crichton's were based on science fact, bit this one is pure fantasy.
.
A group of graduate students is lured to Hawaii to work with a tech company, with a natural purpose. Nanigen is looking for the next big find in pharmaceuticals in plants, insects, etc, at the molecular level. The easiest way to find that is to shrink people to 1/2" in size, by means of a large magnetic field. Really?
.
I have been a fan of Crichton's work since The Andromeda Strain, but this was a difficult book to get through. The action was there, but putting reality on hold for 400+ pages is a little difficult, based on his previous solid performances. The characters are very stereotypical, and they bored me to tears. If you want a futuristic sci-fi book to read, this one isn't too bad, but this does nothing but lessen the legacy Michael Crichton left behind.
.
My Rating: 2.5/5 stars
NI_Rak
Knowing this novel wasn’t entirely authored by Crichton, may he Rest In Peace, made me skeptical going in, though I have enjoyed the bit of Preston I’ve read over the years. MC certainly had a knack for weaving complicated scientific subjects with fiction - just enough explanation without being boring or overwhelming to those unfamiliar. Here, the overall pace of the novel just felt off.

Upfront, most of this review dwells on the negatives, however, I did read through until the end. It was -just- interesting enough to keep the page-turning happening.

Spoilers to follow:

-The Shrinking. For some reason, this took me by surprise, which in itself is a rarity - not enough coffee when I read the beginning is my guess. I almost put the book down, visions of the horrible ‘Honey, I Shrunk the Kids’ film crowding my head. I decided to continue for another 50 pages, and ended up reading through to the end, so...

-There’s a few characters that provide so little to the book, it’s a wonder they didn’t get cut in editing, or at the very least combined with others to make for a smoother read, such as with the shrunken group. I never found that MC wrote hugely fleshed out characters, but here, calling most of them one-dimensional might be too kind. I found no attachment to anyone in the group whatsoever; not that I wanted them to be hurt or die, but when they succeeded at something, or lost someone, the feeling evoked was, ‘ok, next page’, as opposed to actively rooting for them, being relieved, upset, angry, happy, -emotional-!

-A couple characters exist simply as expositional vehicles, rather than having such information be delivered via narration; after the third or fourth time this happened, all I could do was shake my head. It felt unnatural...people don’t often speak this way. One or two others were used only for their research specialty, period, which was convenient for convenience’s sake.

Furthermore, their acceptance of what had happened, their adjustment to it, as well as many of the dangerous issues they encountered, the deaths of their fellow lab acquaintances, they all pretty much rolled with, even the whiny/pessimistic characters.

-The setting itself, within the forest, was the best character for me, and despite how some of the information was related (unnatural character-speak), I really enjoyed the science and technological aspects! Though the book was over 500 pages (per my Kindle), it felt as though it needed to be longer, as so much page-time was action-oriented. I wanted to know more about the processes involved with the shrinking, the environment they were in, the robot and other tech created. It’s this that kept me turning the page, not the characters. The one exception was Rourke...he could’ve been a novella on his own. Instead, he was introduced very, very late, and (it seems) died soon after.

-There were a number of times I wondered about the logical thought processes of the characters. For example, at the beginning, I felt Peter was really, really jumping the gun with the evidence he had...but the shrinking had to get started somehow, I suppose. Good thing for the plot that Drake quickly turned into a “mwah-ha-ha” villain! And then Danny, at the end...I don’t understand why they just let him stay like that in Rourke’s home, what with his arm, not even in the magnet room...but here again, the story had to start its conclusion somehow, no?

In the end, Micro did provide some interesting action, and a couple of surprises within its pages. For sure, it brings a load of nightmare fuel, depending on your personal fears. The science, the tech, and the setting were all fantastic, and I wanted more. The characters were nearly translucent, the plot roller-coastered from believable to plausible to ridiculous several times, and the overall writing simply wasn’t as smooth as you’d expect from either Crichton or Preston. Worth a read if you buy it on sale or borrow it from a friend or library.
Tygralbine
The idea of micro-worlds and those which inhabit them is a fascinating one. If it had been written by Crichton alone, it would no doubt had been one of his best. Unfortunately, Crichton hadn't finished it at the time of his death, and while it was a very good story, the writing itself is somewhat sophomoric. It was hard for me to get past the first quarter of the book, but knowing it came from Crichton's imagination kept me hopeful. It would probably be a good stand-alone book for anyone not used to the way Crichton wrote, but for me, it just didn't work the way I hoped. That isn't the fault of Mr. Preston, I don't think. I was just really hoping for one last bit more from Crichton. Overall, it's a great idea, and there's a sequel that probably won't be written you're going to wish could be.

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