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by John French

  • ISBN: 1849704279
  • Category: Fantasy
  • Author: John French
  • Subcategory: Science Fiction
  • Other formats: mbr txt lrf docx
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Games Workshop; Original edition (July 2, 2013)
  • Pages: 416 pages
  • FB2 size: 1195 kb
  • EPUB size: 1109 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 213
Download Ahriman: Exile (Warhammer) fb2

If you've never read a Warhammer 40k book, this may NOT be the best book to start with, and those not familiar with the Thousands Sons will have no clue as to what is going on so its best to start elsewhere. Released back in 2012, Ahriman : Exile was John French’s first novel for Black Library, and you’re unlikely to find a more assured, complex, detailed debut novel than this.

John French weaves a tight story about oaths, betrayal and trust and it really works. Mister French also does a fine job in description in areas that could easily spiraled out of narrative control. Ultimately we're seeing dreamscapes, magic, and the warp.

Ahriman: Exile by John French is the first in a planned trilogy of novels featuring Ahzek Ahriman, the former Chief Librarian of the Thousand Sons, as its protagonist. It was first released online in December 2012, and in softcover in June 2013. Spurned by his former brothers and his father Magnus the Red, Ahriman is a wanderer, a sorcerer of Tzeentch whose actions condemned an entire Legion to an eternity of damnation.

John French is from Nottingham, England. In addition to writing for Black Library, he has also worked on the Dark Heresy, Rogue Trader and Deathwatch game systems. The Last Remembrancer (Short Story) - published in Hammer and Bolter 7, re-published in Age of Darkness (Anthology) and The Best of Hammer and Bolter: Volume One. The Crimson Fist (Novella) (Imperial Fists/Iron Warriors)- published in Shadows of Treachery (Anthology).

More Chaos Space Marines from Black Library, AHRIMAN, Book 1: AHRIMAN: EXILE Book 2: AHRIMAN: SORCERER Book 3: AHRIMAN: UNCHANGED THE TALON OF HORUS A Warhammer 40,000 novel. More Chaos Space Marines from Black Library. AHRIMAN,. Book 1: AHRIMAN: EXILE. Book 2: AHRIMAN: SORCERER. Book 3: AHRIMAN: UNCHANGED. A Warhammer 40,000 novel. Night lords: the omnibus. Contains the novels Soul Hunter, Blood Reaver and Void Stalker. A Warhammer 40,000 audio drama. Kharn: eater of worlds.

Released back in 2012, Ahriman : Exile was John French’s first novel for Black Library, and you’re unlikely to find a. .

Released back in 2012, Ahriman : Exile was John French’s first novel for Black Library, and you’re unlikely to find a more assured, complex, detailed debut novel than this. The first in a trilogy regarding one of the most famous villains in the Warhammer 40,000 universe, when we first meet him Ahriman is at his lowest ebb, years after the failure of his Rubric and his exile from the Legion he tried to save.

Find ahriman warhammer from a vast selection of Books. Ahriman: Exile (Warhammer 40000) by French, John Book The Cheap Fast Free Post.

Book one in the Ahriman series. Cast out of his Legion, the sorcerer Ahriman, who condemned the Thousand Sons to an eternity of damnation, plots his return to power and the destruction of his foes. READ IT BECAUSE It's the beginning of an epic, time-twisting saga of revenge, betrayal and attempted atonement.

The two Rubricae were silent and still. Charred flakes of debris drifted down to cover the red of their armour. The light in their eyes had dimmed to pale green in their helms. The light in their eyes had dimmed to pale green in their helms s he stood, waiting for a movement, for a sign of awareness. Without Tolbek to guide them they were little more than statues. He glanced around the chamber. Fresh blood was still seeping from heaps of hacked flesh and armour.

The Rubric of Ahriman was the name given to an immensely powerful ritual spell cast by a cabal of Chaos Sorcerers from amongst the Thousand Sons Traitor Legion.

The Rubric of Ahriman was the name given to an immensely powerful ritual spell cast by a cabal of Chaos Sorcerers from amongst the Thousand Sons Traitor Legion, who were led by the XV Legion's former Chief Librarian Ahzek Ahriman, not long after the Legion had fled from their homeworld of Prospero to the Planet of the Sorcerers during the Horus Heresy.

A Chaos Space Marine Sorcerer seeks the power of the godsAll is dust... Spurned by his former brothers and his father Magnus the Red, Ahriman is a wanderer, a sorcerer of Tzeentch whose actions condemned an entire Legion to an eternity of damnation. Once a vaunted servant of the Thousand Sons, he is now an outcast, a renegade who resides in the Eye of Terror. Ever scheming, he plots his return to power and the destruction of his enemies, an architect of fate and master of the warp.
Reviews about Ahriman: Exile (Warhammer) (7):
Quttaro
John French definitely outdid himself in this new reinterpretation of Ahriman. I say this because prior to this he literally was too obsessed with only getting to the Black Library. In that regard he always came over as too focused and obsessed. The few books where he did make appearances he literally acted like a drug addict searching for his fix.

In this book, Ahriman Exile, we finally do get to see the underlying motivations for the character, actions and consequences, as well as the outside influences that shaped him. A definite read for Chaos / renegate fans that don't want simple mindless chaos worshipers.
Getaianne
Ahriman has been my favorite 40k character since the 2nd edition (yes, I've been hooked on 40k since the 90s!). As you can imagine, after reading the Horus Heresy novel A Thousand Sons, my interest in my favorite character (and legion) spiked back to an all time high. While I had pretty much restricted myself to only reading novels out of the Heresy, I decided to give this one a try simply because of my interest in Ahriman. Truthfully, I was sort of disappointed. Its not that French was a terrible writer but his depiction of Ahriman seemed somewhat out of sync with his [Ahriman's] back story. Not to spoil things too much, but I would have liked to have read more about the events (and I do mean specific events) that drove Ahriman to cast his infamous spell. I guess I was hoping/expecting this book to somewhat pick up where HH novel left off. Unfortunately, it didn't do that.
Manazar
This is a story about a villain. The problem is that it tries to give you at least empathy if not sympathy for the villains plight. It probably would have been better being a story about the villains creation rather than his attempt at redemption. Other than that it is colorfully written, has some good secondary characters.
Djang
So the great lord of the Thousand Sons, Ahriman starts off as a silent type boot-lick. Color me surprised. The beginning of the book was a nice eye-opener. It gave some back story and introduced some believable malaise to Ahriman as well as some mystery. Sadly, in my opinion this was not to last. All to quickly, Ahriman goes from no-name exile to mental ninja with an emo complex.

I understand that the Space Marine novels will be about deeds and plans of super-human levels but this novel quickly falls into the typical Black Library foibles of "oh look, if I just use more words that describe effort, this character can then exceed any previously established limit and blow up the enemy/town/continent/world/universe."

You will get a lot of "oh look, he's about to get beat...no wait he concentrated a bit more and now he's whupping butt with his mind bullets."

Sadly I tended to gloss over most of the middle of this book as I quickly tired of the above but then something interesting happened. Plot and character started to creep back in. As previous reviewers have said, there are some interesting characters in this book and a few good surprises. Ahriman does eventually return to someone I'm interested in reading about if only nearing the end. Overall I think this book showed flashes of brilliance but fell a bit short.

I do think Ahriman and the other characters do have tons of room to be developed in further novels, hopefully without so much "Squint, memory palace scene, woe is me comment, mental ninja strike."
Celen
A good book but you really need to have read all of the stories that came before this one to understand the whole story line. Overall a good read but would have been better if I had read the preceeding stories before this one. Again a good read but not great.
Mazuzahn
To be fair I was very surprised by the start. Not how I expected the story to begin, but I liked it. Very creative. Nice setup. Good characters. Ahriman has always been a favorite and this novel really cinched it.

Without spoiling anything Ahriman is on the lam. His focus is survival. He bears the weight of an entire legion on his shoulders and of many Adeptus Astartes characters, he's very human deep down. The intro serves to introduce a few key characters to the readers that will be key later on.

The plot itself is pretty simple. There are some twists but good ones, not ham-fisted M. Night Shyamalan-style twists. No gimmicks. Just characters doing what they will, and sometimes things go as planned...sometimes not. Sometimes you can trust people...sometimes not.

If there is a core theme to the story is it one of trust versus betrayal.

Let's be perfectly clear regarding Ahriman. Really, no matter how you skew it, the story of the Thousand Sons, and Ahriman is one of betrayal. Sometimes purposefully but largely inadvertent betrayals done via `best intentions'. Starting with their father, Magnus the Red and continuing through to the 41st millennium. Ahriman's best intentions created the `Rubric' and functionally turned his brothers in to automata.

Now flash forward to the story in-hand where Ahriman is surrounded by traitors, needing to trust in oaths, depending on each other for survival in a universe that will almost certainly see them all dead.
John French weaves a tight story about oaths, betrayal and trust and it really works.

Mister French also does a fine job in description in areas that could easily spiraled out of narrative control. Ultimately we're seeing dreamscapes, magic, and the warp. Some authors have lost me in the past: trying to describe complicated overlapping of dimensions and the use of warp-spawned powers where I need to re-read a couple times to understand what the hell just happened. Not so with John French. It's not dumbed down. It's just clear writing. He colors beautiful landscapes and horrific scenes deftly without making readers go back and re-read. It keeps the action flowing and pages turning.

I would have read this in one sitting if I wasn't on pain killers for a recent injury. That said, I did pick up the next day and Ahriman: Exile absorbed every spare moment for two days. I was ensnared. John French held my rapt attention for two days like some sort of hostage negotiation. Damn good book.

Was it perfect?

No. If I could make changes I would have made The Harrowing (a fallen chapter of renegade astartes) a bit less overtly MU HA HA evil. Maybe making them a little appealing, less over-the-top. That said, they do a fine job showing how a convert is the greatest zealot. Either way I didn't like them; I don't think we're supposed to. As a tool to contrast proper old-school M31 Legionaries they pale in comparison.

The secondary characters were interesting. The cover art by Fares Maese is lovely. I want a poster of this!

I'd like to see more of this. More Ahriman, but most specifically more Astraeos, Carmenta, Kadin, "Cadar"...even Maroth.

Without really spoiling anything.

A pause hung in the air.
`Why?' she said `Why forgive my betrayal"
Ahriman gave a tired and crooked smile.
`We must all hope that betrayal can be forgiven,' he said and turned away.

Damn, this was a good book.
Black Library is on a roll, another 4 out of 5 stars.

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