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by John Meaney

  • ISBN: 1591024978
  • Category: Fantasy
  • Author: John Meaney
  • Subcategory: Science Fiction
  • Other formats: lrf rtf lit azw
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Pyr (May 2, 2006)
  • Pages: 492 pages
  • FB2 size: 1343 kb
  • EPUB size: 1409 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 380
Download Paradox: Book I of the Nulapeiron Sequence fb2

14 year old Tom Corcorigon is a poor kid with decent parents in the lower stratum of the planet of Nulapeiron, inhabited by a subterranean human civilization whose layers of caves stand not only for physical levels but also social status. In a psuedo-Middle Ages setup, Nobles live in the higher reaches, ruling over those poorer than themselves living and toiling far below.

Paradox: Book I of the Nulapeiron Sequence

Paradox: Book I of the Nulapeiron Sequence. 1591024978 (ISBN13: 9781591024972). Because that's exactly what I'll be trying to do today, after recently finishing the massive three-book "Nulapeiron Sequence" from author John Meaney, yet another (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted here illegally.

Book in the The Nulapeiron Sequence Series). Centuries of self-imposed isolation have transformed Nulapeiron into a world unlike any other - a world of vast subterranean cities maintained by extraordinary organic technologies. For the majority of its peoples, however such wonders have little meaning.

John Meaney is the author of four novels--To Hold Infinity, Paradox, Context, and Resolution, the latter three titles comprising his Nulapeiron Sequence. His novelette "Sharp Tang" was short-listed for the British Science Fiction Association Award in 1995.

Items related to Paradox: Book I of the Nulapeiron Sequence. John Meaney is the author of four novels - To Hold Infinity, Paradox, Context, and Resolution, the latter three titles constituting the Nulapeiron Sequence. John Meaney Paradox: Book I of the Nulapeiron Sequence. ISBN 13: 9781591024972. Paradox: Book I of the Nulapeiron Sequence. His novelette "Sharp Tang" was shortlisted for the British Science Fiction Association Award in 1995, and To Hold Infinity and Paradox were on the BSFA shortlists for Best Novel in 1999 and 2001 respectively.

Book of self-imposed isolation have transformed Nulapeiron into a world unlike any other - a world of vast subterranean cities maintained by extraordinary organic technologies. Denied their democratic rights and restricted to the impoverished lower levels, they are subjected to the brutal law of the Logic Lords and the Oracles, supra-human beings whose ability to truecast the future maintains the status quo. But all this is about to change

Paradox (Nulapeiron John Meaney. Year Published: 1999. The free online library containing 450000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device.

Paradox (Nulapeiron John Meaney. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

Paradox (Nulapeiron 1). by John Meaney Science Fiction & Fantasy . by John Meaney Science Fiction & Fantasy This book has not been rated. ISBN: 0553505890 Global Overview for this book. Please make a journal entry to let me know that you have found this book, you may do this anonymously or you may join. There is no charge to join this site, if you are like myself from time to time you may donate to help support Bookcrossing; but it is not mandatory. Please enjoy this book, if it is not your genre pass it along to someone else or wild release it. In this way we promote literacy and at the same time we can watch our book continue on its journey.

~ 1. NULAPEIRON AD 3404. Like scarlet/amber fireflies hanging in the tunnel’s darkness, the floating tricons read: His desperate hooves are flying, flying-.

Meaney has a degree in physics and computer science, and holds a black belt in Shotokan Karate.

Centuries of self-imposed isolation have transformed Nulapeiron into a world unlike any other - a world of vast subterranean cities maintained by extraordinary organic technologies. For the majority of its peoples, however such wonders have little meaning. Denied their democratic rights and restricted to the impoverished lower levels, they are subjected to the brutal law of the Logic Lords and the Oracles, supra-human beings whose ability to truecast the future maintains the status quo.But all this is about to change.In a crowded marketplace a mysterious, beautiful woman is brutally cut down by a militia squad's graser fire. Amongst the horrified onlookers is young Tom Corcorigan. He recognizes her. Only the previous day she had presented him with a small, seemingly insignificant info-crystal. And only now, as the fire in the dying stranger's obsidian eyes fades, does he comprehend who - or what - she really was: a figure from legend, one of the fabled Pilots.What Tom has still to discover is that his crystal holds the key to understanding mu-space, and so to freedom itself. He doesn't know it yet, but he has been given a destiny to fulfill - nothing less than the rewriting of his future, and that of his world...Spectacularly staged, thrillingly written and set in a visionary future, Paradox places John Meaney at the forefront of science fiction in this new century.
Reviews about Paradox: Book I of the Nulapeiron Sequence (7):
Androlhala
14 year old Tom Corcorigon is a poor kid with decent parents in the lower stratum of the planet of Nulapeiron, inhabited by a subterranean human civilization whose layers of caves stand not only for physical levels but also social status. In a psuedo-Middle Ages setup, Nobles live in the higher reaches, ruling over those poorer than themselves living and toiling far below. While there are some good and bad lords, their experiences are so far removed from the common people that they wouldn't know if their subjects were suffering or not. And they probably wouldn't care anyway. Their grip on power is strengthed not only by armed soldiers bearing "graser" weapons, but by the foresight of the "Oracles", those who can see future visions and quash any resistance before it ever arises. But there are those who want to overthrow this social order and get a new start, but they have no leader to unite them or to give them a way to fight back against the precognitive sight of the Oracles. Tom, a poverty stricken teen gets involved in these affairs when he is given a mysterious info-crystal by a renegade Pilot. Tom assumed Pilots were just a myth because the technology of starship travel seems to have been lost. But here is one in the flesh, and running from soldiers to boot! After the Pilot is killed, Tom is left with the crystal hidden in a talisman his father gave him, and in the coming years he will use its information not only to educate about himself about memories of Earth as seen through the thought records of a Pilot candidate over a thousand years ago, but also allow him to move up the strata, perhaps even to the Nobility itself. The question is, will he choose to join the overlords of this underground world, or destroy them?

I enjoyed this book. It presents a world whose old way of doing things is no longer helping its citizens to live a good life. When stagnant civilizations grow weak, there is always a destroyer lurking in the wings. The character of Tom is portrayed well and doesn't fall into the stereotype of the dashing sci-fi hero. Sometimes he is cowardly, sometimes brave. He is loyal but at times also betrays his friends in the worst possible way. Meaney's world-building skills are also to be commended. This strange technologically advanced in some ways society with traces of psychic and organic living ships and sentient homes strikes one as weird but somehow utterly plausible at the same time. No matter where the human race resides in the galaxy, pitiful creatures that we are, will find a way to subjugate those weaker than ourselves. At first the Nobles are shown as Nazi-like purveyors of style that kill and maim commoners with no remorse, but as we get more into their world, we find that most of them are just glorified debutantes or fops who no longer seem threatening once you learn about their dreadfully boring lives. Meaney at times bring too much of his own interests into the work, especially his alleged expertise in karate, making it a prime element of Tom's abilities. Also, his degrees in physics and computer science only succeed in investing the book with droning gobbledy-gook at times which only confuse the reader instead of making clear the plot. But you can make it through those passages with at least an "impression" of what he was talking about. All in a all, a pretty good book.

Also recommended: Dune by Frank Herbert.
BlackBerry
In the world of Nulaperion society is quite literally stratified by how far underground you live. The top layers are the home of a varied and wealthy aristocracy - all their whims either catered to by their advanced technology or the classes of the lower strata's in their domains.

Tom Corcorigan is the 14 year old son of a lower level market trader. A person of no significance in their world till a fleeing, almost mythical, pilot gifts him with a data crystal that will quite literally change his life and fortune when he one days goes up-strata.

This novel presents a complex world where the ability to understand complex mathematical formula is highly prized and in conjunction with leaps in biological engineering is the basis of much of their advanced technology. Tom's journey takes you through a world of striking poverty and wealthy extravagance and a world on the edge of revolution though many do not realise it.

I have to say I enjoyed this novel, even though I don't really understand all the concepts and jargon the author uses. By the end of the book I really felt for Tom and felt attached to him and I'm looking forward to book 2 in this trilogy very much. This novel is a bit more hard SF than I normally read but I'm glad I picked it up to read.
Mezilabar
Great book! One of my favorite series. Got to love physics to enjoy it. Nerds paradise
Gold as Heart
I'm a huge sci-fi addict and hate that I hate this book since on the surface it has everything I love. Unfortunately, this author seems only capable of writing in disjointed fragments that have virtually no supporting exposition or details, The world seems fascinating, the plot seems intricate and I could easily see myself bonding with the character if only the author could have bothered to tie all the fragments together with exposition and details. This book is more like a script than a novel. I forced myself to muddle through 70 pages of fragments hoping against hope that eventually the author would include more details or that somehow I would acclimate to his fragmented and detail lacking style of writing. But alas, neither occurred and I had to put the book down after 70 pages as I couldn't take any more. And it is a shame, this could have been an awesome book. Give this book to another author (like Stephen Baxter or David Drake) and have them rewrite it using this book as a guide and this would have been super awesome. Such a shame, What a waste of brilliant ideas, characters, and plotlines :(
Manris
If you enjoy Frank Herbert's Dune series, you'll like John Meaney's Paradox. Meaney creates a world of high mathematics as a path to higher consciousness and amazing bio-technology all take place in a multi-leveled, underground society where the higher the social status, the closer to the surface one lives.

The Title: Paradox is a perfect name for this book. It is filled with paradoxical viewpoints of life. On the one hand the upper class lives in a paradise and uses its' high mathematical abilities to further mankind...but that very skill is also used to further the seperation between those on the bottom and those on the top...in Meaney's viewpoint, higher consciousness does not necessarily mean greater connection with fellow humans. High technology is vulnerable to the most basic of attacks: hand to hand combat. And some of the most brilliant minds are also some of the most developed bodies.

As some reviewers have noted, there is a lot of mathematical lingo and thought process involved in this book. However, I found it very readable and highly entertaining. Think of this book as a multi-genre book. Cross Frank Herbert's Dune with Simon Green's Deathstalker and add a smattering of Sylvester Stallone's Rocky and you will get a taste of John Meaney's multiple (and paradoxical interests) filling this novel.

I highly recommend Paradox. I have just begun Context, the next book and the series and I'm looking for to more from John Meaney.

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