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by williams-sean

  • ISBN: 1841495190
  • Category: Fantasy
  • Author: williams-sean
  • Subcategory: Science Fiction
  • Other formats: lit azw txt mobi
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Orbit (2008)
  • Pages: 384 pages
  • FB2 size: 1828 kb
  • EPUB size: 1934 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 363
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Saturn Returns (Astropolis) MP3 CD – Audiobook, MP3 Audio, Unabridged

Saturn Returns (Astropolis) MP3 CD – Audiobook, MP3 Audio, Unabridged. by. Sean Williams (Author, Reader). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. I could not wait for a new book by Sean Williams and Shane Dix (I own all three of their superb series) and of course, I was very willing to give this one my utmost favorable attention even withot the partnership. What a soft porn bore! His ex-writing partner must have been adding some seriousness to past ouevre.

Saturn Returns, the first book of Astropolis, marks a pivotal time in the career of Adelaide author Sean Williams

Saturn Returns, the first book of Astropolis, marks a pivotal time in the career of Adelaide author Sean Williams. Like the title metaphor, it seems the author himself is going through a personal homecoming of sorts. After the debacle of the Books of the Cataclysm, Sean has revisited the path where he started – and, dare I say it, where he belongs. Apart from the humbling cover, I was immediately struck by the title: Saturn Returns.

Frequently Bought Together. This item: Saturn Returns (Astropolis) by Sean Williams. Earth Ascendant (Astropolis) by Sean Williams. Cenotaxis by Sean Williams. Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought.

Used availability for Sean Williams's Saturn Returns. May 2008 : UK Paperback. August 2016 : USA MP3 CD.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. Распространяем знания с 2009.

During a "Saturn Return," the light of this cold and distant world shines on our lives, encouraging us to examine our choices, our aspirations, and our disappointments. It is a time of endings as well as beginnings, and will be dreaded by those whose path through life has been ill chosen. 1 THIS WRECKAGE The reks of art for ever decaying, тАФthe productions of nature for ever renewed. тАФ Robert Charles Maturin.

Books online: Saturn Returns: Book One of Astropolis (Astropolis), 2007, Fishpond.

In the first book of the Astropolis trilogy, Williams renders the passage of aeons, and the rise and fall of civilisations, with cosmic poignancy.

Astropolis, Book 1. By: Sean Williams. Narrated by: Christian Rummel, Sean Williams. Series: Astropolis, Book 1. Length: 11 hrs and 8 mins. Categories: Sci-Fi & Fantasy, Contemporary Sci-Fi. In the first book of the Astropolis trilogy, Williams renders the passage of aeons, and the rise and fall of civilisations, with cosmic poignancy. The Guardian) "Saturn Returns is a wildly original, totally convincing, all-round wonderful novel.

In the forty-third millennium of human history, Imre Bergamasc awakens after two hundred years to the realization that he has been the victim of an elaborate murder plot-a plot that also destroyed the intergalactic transport milieu known as the Continuum. But now that Imre has been reborn, he will stop at nothing to help bring forth the rebirth of the galaxy.
Reviews about Saturn Returns (Astropolis) (7):
Kizshura
I could not wait for a new book by Sean Williams and Shane Dix (I own all three of their superb series) and of course, I was very willing to give this one my utmost favorable attention even withot the partnership. What a soft porn bore! His ex-writing partner must have been adding some seriousness to past ouevre. Because you have nothing here but crazy screwing romps across eternal space and time by characters with medieval morality, pardon "outback" mentality. I already bought Genotaxis but afraid now. Mediocre books make subway rides all so more taxing!
Gogul
Good,imaginitive series.
saafari
This book has an extremely complicated story. By about three-quarters of the way through, it seemed that the story was too big for the number of pages in the book. By the time I got to the end, I found that I was right - this book has no ending. I hate it when a book has no external indication that it is part of a larger series. None of the complex plot lines or mysteries are resolved. I spent the last quarter of the book reluctantly wading through the trivial tie-ups with the expectation that on the last page it would say "to be continued", but it doesnt even say that!
Vertokini
Saturn Returns was an exceptional book, reminding me of far-future master works like Marrow, and Ring. Though the science in the book is not as "hard" as in other authors books, the ideas Williams brings to light are still marvelous, unique, and mind boggling. The literature of the book is excellent, something past readers of Williams would expect. All together a very good read.
Barit
This author is amazing, he always amazes me, before with Shane Dix and now alone. I really look forward for his future books!
Topmen
I loved Sean Williams' "Metal Fatigue", but I'd pretty much skipped everything else by him until now, picking up "Saturn Returns" on the basis of the first few pages.

The goods seemed to be there - hard science fiction; a thriller subtext of memory loss and emotional disconnection from the past; and enough introspection from Imre Bergamasc, our obviously flawed mercenary cum hero, to really get inside his head.

And while I've read it, the whole premise of the novel makes absolutely no sense at all. Because it's supposedly 150 THOUSAND years into this guys future - and I went back and checked that I'd got that right a couple of times to see if this nonsensical novel was tricking me in a subtle way - and despite his being rebuilt from some scratchy old DNA recording of his life, all of his friends (and enemies) are still just hanging around, waiting for him to come home. That's despite a galaxy spanning disaster that knocked everything back to some kind of technological dark ages. Oh yeah, don't forget to add in the thousand or so years it takes him to travel some serious parsecs at something less than the speed of light, during which our hero Imre just slows down his body clock so centuries of travel whip past in the blink of an eye. Great party trick, but it still doesn't mean that time stops in the rest of the Universe as well.

Then there was the concept of ages-old, galaxy spanning intelligences that use a single method of communication and literally fall to pieces when their transmitters go down, as if that's not going to happen as an everyday occurance! What about distributed processing, store-and-forward messaging and redundancy? The speed of light has explicitly not been transcended in this novel - no warp drives or hyperjumping here - yet Williams glosses over the consequences of this and strangely writes as if everyone would have real time communication between star systems and beyond. Or not, because sometimes he declares the issues of cosmic distance yet gleefully ignores them a few pages on.

In the end I found it impossible to reconcile the concept of this being Imre's deep, deep future when everyone treated it like he'd popped out to the corner store for milk and bread and came back a bit later than expected because he'd been nattering with the neighbours on the way. But hang on, to them that's exactly what's it like, because there are other copies of Imre floating around, doing evil and generally causing mayhem. But, and this is where it really started to creak and groan for me, Imre(s) and his motley crew(s) stick together pretty much all through those 150,000+ years, so that when our flawed Imre arrives back "home", nothing much actually is different. So all the interesting implications and observations that someone displaced by so much could reflect on are ignored. Considering that language evolves enough in the span of centuries that casual readers now struggle with Shakespeare, the idea that Imre could even communicate with anyone is farcial.

Ultimately the structural flaws in "Saturn Returns" were way too much bother to overcome. Evolution of any kind - apart from Imre's personal journey of ethics - is ignored to the point that, disappointingly, I'm not even a little bit compelled to buy the concluding books in this series. It's basically another good kids SciFi book that will help get them hooked on the genre, but there's not much here for adults.
Xinetan
The old wake up in the future, sex changed, memory lost, surrounded by bizarre intelligences story.

Oh, wait, that's a new one on me. It also doesn't get any less crazypants or frantic from there.

Now admittedly a couple of things in this were distracting. The name of the main character, Imre, now a woman, and the word Saturn. This means in my brain, or close enough too, Saturn Girl, Legion of Superheroes. Imre is a posthuman, yes, hanging out with Lightning Lad and from Titan, no.

Also the Luminous thing, having just looked at that book by Greg Egan for another reason today, and having a few posthuman similarities that was a bit distracting.

Basically, Williams has delivered the goods again. Packed into what is these days a short book (although part of a trilogy it appears) is a whole heap of good New Space Opera. Not as bleak as Reynolds, there are still plenty of surprises, different forms of humans, both normal and post, spaceships, Warhammeresque religions, huge distances and shooting at people. Take Reynolds, blend with a bit of Stross, maybe add a pinch of Simon R. Green's Deathstalker and you might get a bit of an idea of the flavour of this novel.

Towards the end you start to get a look at what the various characters from Imre's earlier life really were up to, and the same for his particular incarnation. Being posthumans, this could mean what several different varieties of their selves had been up to, in various times and parts of space.

Now all he has to do is keep it up for the next book, something I will definitely be looking forward too, despite not being a Gary Numan fan.

Given the stuff packed into this book, most of us will find his appendix and its information quite useful, I think.

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