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Download The Chip : How Two Americans Invented the Microchip and Launched a Revolution fb2

by T.R. Reid

  • ISBN: 0375758283
  • Category: Engineering
  • Author: T.R. Reid
  • Subcategory: Engineering
  • Other formats: mobi lrf lrf mbr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks; Revised edition (October 9, 2001)
  • Pages: 320 pages
  • FB2 size: 1448 kb
  • EPUB size: 1255 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 592
Download The Chip : How Two Americans Invented the Microchip and Launched a Revolution fb2

3 Jack Kilby and Robert Noyce hit upon the stunning discovery that would lead to the silicon microchip and.

Description this book The Chip Barely fifty years ago, computers were gargantuan, vastly expensive things that only a handful of scientists had ever seen. The world s brightest engineers were stymied in their quest to make these machines small and affordable, until two ingenious young Americans finally devised the solution. Jack Kilby and Robert Noyce hit upon the stunning discovery that would lead to the silicon microchip and.

org to approved e-mail addresses. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. A Note of Madness.

The transistor, invented two days before Christmas 1947 by William Shockley, Walter Brattain, and John Bardeen of Bell Labs, promised to eliminate all the bugs of the vacuum tube in one fell swoop

The transistor, invented two days before Christmas 1947 by William Shockley, Walter Brattain, and John Bardeen of Bell Labs, promised to eliminate all the bugs of the vacuum tube in one fell swoop. The transistor was something completely new. It was based on the physics of nts like silicon and germanium that have unusual electronic characteristics.

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 9. 8% restored. Главная The chip : how two Americans invented the microchip and launched a revolution. The chip : how two Americans invented the microchip and launched a revolution.

Jack Kilby and Robert Noyce hit upon the stunning discovery that would make possible the silicon microchip, a work that would .

Jack Kilby and Robert Noyce hit upon the stunning discovery that would make possible the silicon microchip, a work that would ultimately earn Kilby the Nobel Prize for physics in 2000. Reid tells the gripping adventure story of their invention and of its growth into a global information industry. This is the story of how the digital age began.

Reid has elegantly interwoven the biographies of Jack Kilby and Robert Noyce. The transistor was invented jointly by three physicists, the integrated circuit by two engineers, and PCR by a single chemist. One of the delights of the book was learning how the two inventors thought, how they proceeded, and why they went in the directions they did. Robert Noyce, founder of Intel, had developed a process to make transistors in arrays on a silicon wafer. Each of these inventions spawned literally thousands of others, enabling whole new industries that have changed human activities in fundamental ways that we still little understand and that are thrilling us still.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Chip: How Two Americans Invented the Microchip and Launched a Revolution as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Book details Author : . 3. Description this book The Chip Barely fifty years ago, computers were gargantuan, vastly expensive things that only a handful of scientists had ever seen.

Silicon chips drive just about everything that sucks power, from toys to heart monitors, but their inventors aren't . Overall, the book is very nice and very readable.

Silicon chips drive just about everything that sucks power, from toys to heart monitors, but their inventors aren't nearly as widely known as Edison and Ford. Reid has thoroughly updated The Chip, his 1985 exploration of the life work of inventors Jack Kilby and Robert Noyce, to reflect the colossal shift toward smarter gadgets that has taken place since then. I understand that the book is aimed at as much as possible wide spectrum of readers, however, sometimes it suffers from technical inaccuracy. Firstly, the author claimed that loudspeaker in radio works with direct current because the rectifier is used in the radio.

Barely fifty years ago a computer was a gargantuan, vastly expensive thing that only a handful of scientists had ever seen. The world’s brightest engineers were stymied in their quest to make these machines small and affordable until the solution finally came from two ingenious young Americans. Jack Kilby and Robert Noyce hit upon the stunning discovery that would make possible the silicon microchip, a work that would ultimately earn Kilby the Nobel Prize for physics in 2000. In this completely revised and updated edition of The Chip, T.R. Reid tells the gripping adventure story of their invention and of its growth into a global information industry. This is the story of how the digital age began.
Reviews about The Chip : How Two Americans Invented the Microchip and Launched a Revolution (7):
Nto
From my point of view, the book is worth reading both for laypersons interested in technique and specialists in the field. It is nice combination of technical subject and history (both business one and technical one). In the first chapter, the author brings short introduction to the chips and their importance for electronics as we know it today. Then brief history of electronic parts, going from discovery that current can go through vaccum to termionic valves to transistors and finally to integrated circuits is provided. Next two chapters are dedicated to Jack Kilby and Robert Noyce CVs and their ideas how to build chips . Then legal battle between Texas Instruments and Fairchild Semiconductors for patent of integrated circuit is described. After it, the author is telling story about integrated circuits using in many fields. The author included two purely technical chapters as well. First one is on binary logic and computer science development. and second one is concerning calculator (or primitive computer) and how it works. Last chapter is decicated to last years of both inventors of chip.

Overall, the book is very nice and very readable. I understand that the book is aimed at as much as possible wide spectrum of readers, however, sometimes it suffers from technical inaccuracy.
Firstly, the author claimed that loudspeaker in radio works with direct current because the rectifier is used in the radio. It is wrong since speaker operates with AC but with relatively low frequency in comparison with radio signal. The reason for using rectifier is to get modulation envelope (what is more, this is true only for AM radios). Then high frequency part of signal is filtered by capacitor and AC low frequency current for loudspeak is gained.
Second issue is concerning Boolean logic. The author says that equation x^2 = x is valid in Boolean logic since it has solution 0 and 1. That is true, however, it is not reason why this equation is important for Boolean algebra. The true reason is that the equation says: "Power of logical variable is always variable itself". Similar law is valid for logical addition, namely x + x = x.

Finally, I would like to note that the autor consider Mr. Deming (founder of quality management noted in conjuction with Japanese chip manufactures) as somebody who firstly used statistics to imporove manufacturing processes. Personally, I think it is not true since first man who used scientific approach of this kind was Taylor in the beginning of 20th century.
Beazekelv
"The Chip" brings together the brains who propelled us into the digital age. You’ll gain some insight into the personalities of Jack Kilby, Robert Noyce, Patrick Haggerty and the companies they worked for and created. Many of the other visionaries are illuminated. If you’re in the electronics business, do your brain a favor and get this book. The book was published in 1985. Do not think that it is dated; history is by definition dated, and this is a book on the history of an industry. I’ve been a very small part of this industry making “The Chip” all the more important to me. I designed and manufactured electronic equipment. Reid makes a few errors in his technical descriptions, but they do not detract from the important substance of this book.
Thiama
"The Chip: How Two Americans Invented the Microchip and Launched a Revolution," by TR Reid, Random House, NY, 2001. This 309 page paperback provides a highly readable account of the invention of the integrated circuit. It begins with the discovery of the Edison effect and carefully explains the various technologies in a non-technical way as it goes along. The heros of the story are Jack Kilby of Texas Instruments and Robert Noyce of Fairchild Camera and later Intel. Both invented integrated circuits and received patents for them. Interferences were filed to resolve the issue resulting ultimately in a cross licensing arrangement. Kilby also invented the pocket calculator.

Along the way the book describes the work of Edison, Fleming and DeForest in invention of the vacuum tube, and later the invention of the transistor at Bell Labs. Other technologies are also mentioned including development of radar and television, the first Altair computer, and the Intel microprocessors. The transition from magnetic core memory to semiconductor RAM is described. The story of the pocket calculator, digital watches, and some early computers are mentioned. Apple is mentioned but not Motorola. And little is said of Microsoft. Strangely absent are Radio Shack and their TRS-80, Commodore, Atari, Sinclair, TI-99-4a, and CP/M.

The book was originally written in 1985, and then revised and update in 2001. Not surprisingly it devotes considerable space to the Japanese conquest of digital memory chips. It notes that when shortages forced domestic customers to use Japanese chips, they found those made in Japan were of higher quality. This discovery was a major factor is the quality programs initiated soon after. The books stops before the emergence of China as a major producer of electronics.

The detailed non-technical explanations of numerous related topics (thermionic emission, discovery of the electron, conductivity theory, doping, Boolean algebra, digital arithmetic, Deming quality programs, patent law, operation of a digital calculator, etc) make this an excellent introduction to the field. In addition to those interested in the history of technology, those considering careers in engineering, electronics, or information technology will find the book especially useful. Extensive references. Indexed.

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