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by Allan R. Odden,Sarah J. Archibald

  • ISBN: 141296962X
  • Category: Education & Teaching
  • Author: Allan R. Odden,Sarah J. Archibald
  • Subcategory: Schools & Teaching
  • Other formats: lrf rtf mbr txt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Corwin; 1 edition (January 12, 2009)
  • Pages: 184 pages
  • FB2 size: 1679 kb
  • EPUB size: 1348 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 713
Download Doubling Student Performance: . . . And Finding the Resources to Do It fb2

This book takes us behind the doors of unusually high-performing .

This book takes us behind the doors of unusually high-performing high-poverty schools to show us how they do it and where they get the funding. She has a PhD in educational leadership in policy analysis (ELPA) from the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and currently holds an appointment as a lecturer in the ELPA department. Her career at the University of Wisconsin began as an undergraduate in political science; she received her BA in 1993.

Doubling Student Performance . .and Finding the Resources to Do It. by Sarah J. Archibald.

Knowing the true costs associated with reallocating resources and the incremental costs a district must incur to implement instructional coaching will assist school districts with the implementation process. Odden and Archibald (2009) studied schools and districts that doubled student achievement, finding uniformly, a large investment in widespread, systemic and ongoing professional development 9 for these schools.

Odden, Allan R and Sarah Archibald. Further, we connect both foci of this book-restructuring to double student performance and the most effective use of educational resources-to some emerging perspectives on school finance adequacy. Doubling Student Performance. nd Finding the Resources to Do it. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, 2009. We also set all courses of action with the process of large-scale organizational change, as both substantial school restructuring and resource reallocation represent large-scale change from an organizational perspective. The Organization of This Book.

Doubling Student Performance book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Doubling Student Performance:.

Allan Odden is Professor Emeritus of Educational Leadership and Policy .

CPRE is a consortium of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Pennsylvania, Harvard, Michigan, Northwestern, Teachers College-Columbia University, and Stanford Universities.

You could appreciate this book Doubling Student Performance .

You could appreciate this book Doubling Student Performance:. By Kyle P. Walsh In Doubling Student Performance and Finding the Resources to Do It, Odden and Archibald (2009) use a variety of examples from different schools and school structures in providing examples of ways that schools have increased student achievement.

3. Description this book Please continue to the next pageOnline PDF About For Books Doubling Student Performance: And Finding The Resources To Do It by Allan R. Odden Free, Read PDF About For Books Doubling Student Performance: And Finding The Resources To Do It by Allan R. Odden Free, Full PDF About For Books Doubling Student Performance: And Finding The Resources To Do.

Ten Strategies for Doubling Student Performance. Odden, Allan; Archibald, Sarah (2009). Doubling Student Performance and finding the resources to do it. Thousand Oaks, Calif: Corwin Press. ISBN 978-1-4129-7148-5. ISBN 978-1-4129-6963-5. Odden, Allan; Wallace, Marc (2007). How to Create World Class Teacher Compensation. St. Paul, MN: Freeload Press. More about Allan R. Odden.

Research-based strategies for turning around low-performing schools!This valuable text combines the latest research with a national study of diverse schools that dramatically increased student achievement by implementing key strategies and reallocating resources.
Reviews about Doubling Student Performance: . . . And Finding the Resources to Do It (4):
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In Doubling Student Performance and Finding the Resources to Do It, Odden and Archibald (2009) use a variety of examples from different schools and school structures in providing examples of ways that schools have increased student achievement. They use rural, suburban, and urban schools and districts to demonstrate that these strategies are not only successful in a given environment when working with specific students. The bulk of Odden and Archibald’s (2009) work stems from the following core concepts:

Pinpointing the performance problem and challenges at hand
Setting ambitious goals and maintaining high expectations for students and instructors
Changing curricula to match what students are expected to learn
Using formative assessments and data-driven decision making in an ongoing manner
Conducting meaningful professional learning
Using time efficiently and effectively
Extending student learning time (beyond the school day)
Maintaining a collaborative professional culture
Practicing widespread instructional and distributed leadership
Implementing best practices school-wide and using coaches to facilitate teacher improvement

Odden and Archibald (2009) emphasize that these alone will not guarantee gains in student performance. One specific step Odden and Archibald (2009) offer is to reduce reading class sizes. In addition, they argue all teachers, including the music, art, and physical education teachers, should be involved in reading instruction, whether that means taking a small group, an individual student, or otherwise. Through doing this, teachers can have smaller groups and better focus reading instruction. Odden and Archibald (2009) also emphasize that the best, most experienced reading teachers should work with the students who struggle most in reading.

As for the resources needed to support increasing student achievement, Odden and Archibald (2009) do not call for going out and purchasing “materials.” Rather, they suggest looking for resources (time and money) in what the school currently has. Additionally, Odden and Archibald (2009) explain that professional development programs need several core components, including time for training, time during school day/year for ongoing collaborative planning, trainers to provide training (which could be a variety of different people from in or out of school and district), instructional coaches, administration, and other resources that could be used as and for supplies.

Of course, even following these steps will not guarantee that student achievement will be doubled. A school environment that values appropriate discipline, and physical and emotional safety for the students and staff, is equally critical, as is hiring talented and committed individuals as teachers, and school and district leaders. Improving student performance does require resources, but not always in the way one might think. In using the best practices mentioned above, schools can in fact increase student achievement.

Opinion of the Argument

I believe Odden and Archibald (2009) take a very realistic and easy to understand approach to increasing student achievement. The ideas mentioned do not generally require a lot of new money, which is one of the biggest obstacles schools and districts continue to face. As I was reading, I found myself continually thinking about themes like equity and social justice. I mainly questioned where students are receiving extra support, and how this fits into a traditional school model. In other words, it is obvious that some students require extra time and support in order to “catch up” to their peers. However, there is only a certain amount of time in the school day. Assuming students could or would not take advantage of after school or summer school programming, I wonder where that time comes from. If students are in fact receiving extra reading instruction, for example, during the day, what are they missing? Are they being pulled out of science or social studies? Art, music, physical education? Are they missing recess?

Odden and Archibald (2009) discussed using a multi tiered system of supports to help in identifying which students did in fact require additional support. If the most struggling students are being pulled out of their classrooms, it is likely they are missing core, grade level content. This would seem to only perpetuate the achievement gaps that currently exist, which is not equitable, especially when one considers who our most marginalized students are (students with disabilities, students of color, students who are culturally and linguistically diverse). If these students are going elsewhere to receive “extra support,” the other students are likely receiving enrichment in some form or another.

Any teacher or educational leader would absolutely buy into something- be it a program, structure, or something else- that guarantees student achievement. Finding resources within schools, and considering what is already available, is critical to being efficient and mindful of the best ways to go about improving student achievement. However, often times the same approach that helps one school be successful does not always translate to other contexts. Because of this, I wonder if other factors are at play. From the work of Odden and Archibald (2009) it would appear that these approaches are in fact successful in a variety of contexts. It would be interesting to learn more about schools that allow for student needs and differentiation that does not also necessarily perpetuate the achievement gap, and instead pits student strengths as a means for supporting other student weaknesses. We could then be confident that these approaches ensure non-negotiable equity at all times, truly raising student achievement for all.

Relevant School Literature

Five Strategies for Creating a High-Growth School
Battelle for Kids: SOAR Learning & Leading Collaborative
http://www.battelleforkids.org/docs/default-source/publications/soar_five_strategies_for_creating_a_high-growth_school.pdf?sfvrsn=2
*Strategies from high growth schools and learning from the best!

Building Capacity to Transform Literacy Learning
National Center for Literacy Education
http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/About/NCLE/NCLEshortlitreview.pdf
*Building capacity from shared practices

The Principal’s companion: Strategies to Lead Schools for Student and Teacher Success
Authors: Pam Robbins & Harvey Alvy
https://books.google.com/books?id=mZxyAwAAQBAJ&pg=PA40&lpg=PA40&dq=Odden+and+Archibald+%282009%29&source=bl&ots=3ts_QVmxe3&sig=xcH3591AonByC95y52DFt7tP4GU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwigxMLrvNrJAhWD9x4KHWOrC7k4MhDoAQgoMAI#v=onepage&q=Odden%20and%20Archibald%20%282009%29&f=false
*The importance of having a visionary instructional leader
Bolanim
Major Assertions
Doubling Student Performance and Finding the Resources to Do it by Allan Odden and Sarah Archibald (2009) examines schools from rural, suburban, and urban schools that have doubled student achievement. The authors provide examples of these districts by studying school districts around Wisconsin as well as other districts throughout the country. Odden and Archibald (2009) layout the 10 steps to doubling student performance, which include the following:

Understand the performance problem and challenge
Set ambitious goals for students and instructors
Change curriculum programming
Use formative assessments and data-driven decision making
Conduct ongoing intensive professional development
Use time efficiently and effectively
Extend student learning time
Maintain a collaborative professional culture
Practice widespread instructional leadership
Implement best practices school wide

The authors note that these ten steps alone will not guarantee gains in students achievement, but when paired with other components, student gains can be expected. To accompany these ten steps, the authors spend time discussing how important it is to reduce class size (especially at the elementary level) and provide a quality, focused professional development program for educators.

Odden and Archibald (2009) determine that reducing reading class sizes is a good place to start in order to raise reading achievement. They also make the argument that all teachers in the school, including the music, art, and physical education teachers, should be involved in reading instruction. This allows for smaller class sizes and more focused instruction time. The best reading teachers should be placed with the lowest performing students in order to see the greatest gains in achievement.

Finding resources to provide a comprehensive professional development program is another key to producing improvements within a school. Before looking for extra funds, Odden and Archibald (2009) suggest that the time and money can be found in the current schedule and budget. The authors claim that a professional development program needs the six resources including teacher time for training, time during school day/year for collaborative planning, trainers, instructional coaches, administration, miscellaneous resources for supplies.

Finally, Odden and Archibald (2009) make it clear that following these ten steps, reducing class size, and providing quality professional development alone cannot guarantee that a school will double achievement. They argue that it is important for schools and districts to provide an environment of order, discipline, and safety for the students and staff, hire talented, dedicated individuals as teachers, principals, and district leaders and to understand that instructional improvement drives resources. By combining these concepts with using best practices, schools and districts throughout the country have seen significant gains in student achievement.

Opinion of the Argument
I find what Odden and Archibald (2009) covered in their book to be extremely useful in understanding what steps to take in order to raise student achievement, however there are a few questions and concerns I have when thinking about where students are receiving services and how these students are being provided with extra support in order to make gains. The authors referenced using a three tiered system in order to determine which students needed extra services in order to increase achievement. Within this system, students are being pulled out of their classroom to receive extra help, which causes them to miss the content that is being taught in the classroom. Thinking about this through a social justice lens, I have a hard time believing that this is what is best for these learners. At the schools that Odden and Archibald (2009) studied, schools are providing professional development on how to support these low achieving students, however they could take it further by ensuring that students are being provided with services within the classroom with the rest of their grade level peers.

I think everyone would agree, doubling student achievement, and having the resources to do so, is something that all schools can strive to accomplish. However, I wonder if this process would have the same effect on closing the achievement gap at these same schools. One of the arguments that the authors make is to have students who are struggling receive extra help. While this is going on, what are the other students who are already proficient readers doing? Are they receiving extra enrichment in certain content areas? If this is the case, this maintains the achievement gap and is yet another opportunity that traditionally marginalized students have to miss out on. Is there a way to have these strong readers pair with some of the struggling readers in order to provide this extra instruction in reading while at the same time reducing the gap that currently exists?

Related School Literature Research

Five Strategies for Creating a High-Growth School
Battelle for Kids: SOAR Learning & Leading Collaborative
http://www.battelleforkids.org/docs/default-source/publications/soar_five_strategies_for_creating_a_high-growth_school.pdf?sfvrsn=2

“There’s an old adage that to be the best, you have to learn from the best. This is also true in education. By mining the practices of high-growth districts and schools, we can improve learning opportunities for all students. What promising practices are high-growth schools using to accelerate student learning?”

Building Capacity to Transform Literacy Learning
National Center for Literacy Education
http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/About/NCLE/NCLEshortlitreview.pdf

“The National Center for Literacy Education (NCLE) supports teams of educators in collaborative, inquiry-based professional learning. Effective collaborative inquiry teams build sustainable capacity in schools by giving teachers skills, structures, and support systems to continually learn from and refine their shared practice.”

The Principal’s companion: Strategies to Lead Schools for Student and Teacher Success
Authors: Pam Robbins & Harvey Alvy
https://books.google.com/books?id=mZxyAwAAQBAJ&pg=PA40&lpg=PA40&dq=Odden+and+Archibald+%282009%29&source=bl&ots=3ts_QVmxe3&sig=xcH3591AonByC95y52DFt7tP4GU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwigxMLrvNrJAhWD9x4KHWOrC7k4MhDoAQgoMAI#v=onepage&q=Odden%20and%20Archibald%20%282009%29&f=false

“Of all the elements needed for a successful school, a competent, responsive and visionary principal may be the most important. And for over a decade, principals of all experience levels have turned to The Principal’s Companion for ideas, techniques and reflective opportunities that help them do their jobs better.”
Stoneshaper
This book has provided a template of ideas for our school board and administration to consider in prioritizing our budgeting process in order to better meet the needs of our students.

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