» » Some Thoughts Concerning Education (Dodo Press)

Download Some Thoughts Concerning Education (Dodo Press) fb2

by John Locke

  • ISBN: 1409961060
  • Category: Education & Teaching
  • Author: John Locke
  • Subcategory: Schools & Teaching
  • Other formats: mobi rtf mbr lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Dodo Press (May 1, 2009)
  • Pages: 190 pages
  • FB2 size: 1644 kb
  • EPUB size: 1369 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 401
Download Some Thoughts Concerning Education (Dodo Press) fb2

At the university press. SonDon: C. J. CLAY AND SONS, Cambridge university press warehouse, Ave maria lane. Locke has indeed written a book on intellectual education, but this is not the Thoughts it is the Conduct of the Understanding^-. R. H. O. SEDEERGH VICARAGE, YORKSHIRE, Jan. 23, 1884.

Some Thoughts Concerning Education is a 1693 treatise on the education of gentlemen written by the English philosopher John Locke. For over a century, it was the most important philosophical work on education in England.

Anyone wishing to understand the thought and philosophy of Locke, can not afford to ignore this volume in the corpus of Lockean writings.

John Locke (1632-1704) was an English philosopher. Locke is considered the first of the British Empiricists, but is equally important to social contract theory

John Locke (1632-1704) was an English philosopher. Locke is considered the first of the British Empiricists, but is equally important to social contract theory. His ideas had enormous influence on the development of epistemology and political philosophy, and he is widely regarded as one of the most influential Enlightenment thinkers and contributors to liberal theory.

Some Thoughts Concerning Education book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Some Thoughts Concerning Education book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Some Thoughts Concerning Education as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

According to Locke, the goal of education is not to create a scholar, but to create a virtuous ma. This is an important point in Locke’s Some Thoughts Concerning Education because it is the basis for the entirety of this work. This lets people define who they are, or, their character.

According to Locke, the goal of education is not to create a scholar, but to create a virtuous man. He believes that learning morals is more important. If every human were to learn through recollection then truly we have no freedom as this means our character and mind are virtually predestined for us.

Locke’s Some Thoughts Concerning Education was mostly composed from a series of letters to a friend about the education of his children. Locke believed that the purpose of education was to bring children up to be virtuous, using the power of reason to overcome desire.

Page 3. Some Thoughts Concerning Education. here propos'd has had no ordinary effects upon a gentleman's son it was not design'd for.

Some Thoughts Concerning Education. Page 3. I will not say the good temper of the child did not very much contribute to it; but this I think you and the parents are satisfy'd of, that a contrary usage, according to the ordinary disciplining of children, would not have mended that temper, nor have brought him to be in love with his book, to take a pleasure in learning

John Locke's works of political and social philosophy, written in the 17th century, have strongly influenced intellectuals ever since - including the . Some Thoughts Concerning Education Great books on education. Francis William Garforth.

John Locke's works of political and social philosophy, written in the 17th century, have strongly influenced intellectuals ever since - including the founders of the United States of America. Born in 1632 in Wrington, England, Locke studied at Christ Church, Oxford, where he earned his . degrees in the late 1650's. He also studied medicine and earned a medical license. His studies led to an interest in contemporary philosophers influenced by science, such as Rene Descartes.

John Locke (1632–1704). The Harvard Classics

John Locke (1632–1704). The Harvard Classics. 141. The next good quality belonging to a gentleman, is good breeding. 143. As the before-mentioned consists in too great a concern how to behave ourselves towards others; so the other part of ill-breeding lies in the appearance of too little care of pleasing or shewing respect to those we have to do with. To avoid this these two things are requisite: first, a disposition of the mind not to offend others; and secondly, the most acceptable and agreeable way of expressing that disposition.

John Locke (1632-1704) was an English philosopher. Locke is considered the first of the British Empiricists, but is equally important to social contract theory. His ideas had enormous influence on the development of epistemology and political philosophy, and he is widely regarded as one of the most influential Enlightenment thinkers and contributors to liberal theory. His writings influenced Voltaire and Rousseau, many Scottish Enlightenment thinkers, as well as the American revolutionaries. This influence is reflected in the American Declaration of Independence. Locke's theory of mind is often cited as the origin for modern conceptions of identity and "the self", figuring prominently in the later works of philosophers such as David Hume, Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Immanuel Kant. He exercised a profound influence on philosophy and politics, in particular on liberalism. Most modern libertarians claim him as an influence. He was a strong influence on Voltaire, while his arguments concerning liberty and the social contract later influenced the written works of Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson. His works include: Second Treatise of Government (1690) and An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding (1690).
Reviews about Some Thoughts Concerning Education (Dodo Press) (5):
Xar
This is an outstanding volume from one of the most important thinkers of Western civilization. This is a bridge linking the two major classics from Locke, An Essay concerning Human Understanding and the Two Treatises of Government. In this volume, we see Locke's dependence on Stoic philosophy (especially that of Seneca) and the effect that Aristotelian philosophy had on him.
"As the Strength of the Body lies chiefly in being able to endure Hardships, so also does that of the Mind. And the great Principle and Foundation of all Vertue and Worth, is . . . That a Man is able to deny himself his own Desires, cross his own Inclinations, and purely follow what Reason directs as best, tho' that appetite lean the other way." And how does one do this? Locke's answer is through education (i.e., through habit).
Anyone wishing to understand the thought and philosophy of Locke, can not afford to ignore this volume in the corpus of Lockean writings. This edition is a very scholarly edition, there is another modern edition available as well. To bad the editors of the Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke are not very organized, at the rate these volumes are being produced, the complete writings will not be available during my lifetime.
The world needs a modern edition of the writings of Locke, he is too important a thinker not to have this - if nothing else, for us inspiring Lockean scholars. :o)
Raelin
This version is awful. No page numbers or copyright page. It's a nightmare to cite.
Nalmezar
I bought this thinking the table of contents would be nice. Well, it was nice but the formatting of the book is entirely unprofessional. It looks as if someone simply copied and pasted a tabled word document into an Amazon kindle publishing app.

Worse of all - no page numbers. Locations are useless when a syllabus asks one to read x and y pages starting from page z.
Androwyn
It constantly freezes and forces you to close the program. If you don't think that's annoying, try doing it 4 times in a row and see how badly you want to write a poor review.
Wohald
This is amazingly accessible for a book written 320 years ago. A small bit of his vocabulary is archaic, and his delivery is more wordy than is common in modern prose. Still, today's reader will find interest in the ideas, not just the book's place in history.

To place him in history, Locke's life spanned the last three quarters of the 17th century. He followed the scientific revolution initiated by Francis Bacon and Isaac Newton, whom he admired, and the philosopher Thomas Hobbes. An early philosophe, he predated Burke, Hume, Voltaire and Rousseau by about a century.

While Locke was a doctor, certainly the worst advice in the book has to do with medicine. Although the scientific revolution had begun, it had not progressed to the point of evidence-based theories of disease. As one example, Locke proposes that his upper-class readers put their children in thin cloaks and shoes, so they will be toughened by exposure to cold. No thought of isolating them from bugs.

Fully half of the book used dedicated to the moral and ethical formation of a child. He discourses at length on what to do about children who lie, daydream, are cruel to animals, are querulous (froward), inattentive, rude, bashful and otherwise imperfectly formed in character. He is very classic in his view that one must educate the whole child. In fact, he only gets around to talking about academic subjects in the last fifth of the book, opening with the quote " Learning. -- You will wonder, perhaps, that I put learning last, especially if I tell you I think it the least part."

Before getting to academics, he addresses dancing, which he believes is useful to a child in many ways; music, which he thinks is not worth the considerable time it takes to master; drawing, which he thinks is a skill every gentleman should possess; swimming, which is salubrious for the health and can save your life; fencing and horseback riding, which are essential gentlemanly skills.

Young children need to learn how to read and write. It is important that they learn naturally. Being forced to learn can sour the experience for them and get their whole academic career off to an unfortunate start. Children should be surrounded by reading and writing, and be led to exercise them for pleasure.

In this context, children should not be asked to read texts that are beyond their appropriate level of difficulty, or that are foreign to the child's natural interests. He specifically says that any attempt to read the Bible in order would be seriously misplaced. Children should be taught the essential Bible stories such as the story of creation, Abraham and Isaac, Joseph in Egypt, Daniel in the lion's den and so forth in a simple form and in such a way that they tell a moral. In other words, children should be familiar with the Bible as a cultural touchstone of Christian society.

Locke was surprisingly modern in his religious views. Rather like the philosophes who followed him and the deists who established the American government, he thought that the Christian religion was a good thing even though he says that there are some items of faith that simply cannot bear scientific investigation. Familiar with gravity from Newton's work, he posited that the great flood might have been caused by a shift in the Earth's center of gravity. But he quickly says that this is the kind of inquiry we ought not to undertake; there is a clear divide between the worlds of natural science and religion, and we make a mistake if we confound the two.

Then on to academics. Foreign languages are important in the measure that a person will use them in life. That is saying, the ability to speak a living language is a considerable asset. Knowledge of grammar, he believed, is not nearly so important. Latin is not worth the time that was usually given to it in his age, and Greek is important only for the professional scholar.

Locke believed the geography and history were very important. He also believed, contrary to my experience with modern students, that they are intrinsically interesting. He believed that every person should master arithmetic, geometry, and rhetoric. Memorizing long passages in foreign languages, however, and writing poetry he characterizes as fruitless wastes of time, the development of life skills that are simply not remunerative for most people.

Concluding his advice on academics, Locke went on to say that the child should be familiar with the manual skills, the crafts such as carpentry, gardening and the like. He advocated that learning manual skills is essential in mental development. He recommended that a child learn bookkeeping, inasmuch as he would someday be in the position of managing an estate.

The whole book is written with a great sense of humanity. Locke treats the child as an adult in the process of formation, fully worthy of dignity, not to be beaten or dominated in any way for any purpose other than character development. Locke supports corporal punishment, but only as a last resort, only when authorized by the father, and only upon occasion, to reinforce a specific instruction. His philosophy is quite consistent with the practice in American schools even through the 1960s or 1970s, when Benjamin Spock was ascendant, until the principle of individual responsibility faded as therapeutic schools of child rearing became ascendant. Put another way, Locke believed firmly in free will. Every child is a moral actor, responsible for his own actions, and it is the responsibility of the parent to develop that moral character.

I leave it to other reviewers to recite the ways in which Locke's views tie out to those of Aristotle and his other philosophical precursors. To me the news is in how well he outlined the path going forward from his era into our own.

Related to Some Thoughts Concerning Education (Dodo Press) fb2 books: