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by Joanna Williams

  • ISBN: 1441194509
  • Category: Education & Teaching
  • Author: Joanna Williams
  • Subcategory: Schools & Teaching
  • Other formats: mbr doc azw lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic (January 17, 2013)
  • Pages: 208 pages
  • FB2 size: 1374 kb
  • EPUB size: 1407 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 565
Download Consuming Higher Education: Why Learning Can't be Bought fb2

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Article in Higher Education 69(1) · January 2015 with 46 Reads. How we measure 'reads'.

Higher Education volume 69, pages161–163(2015)Cite this article.

Published: 03 April 2014. Joanna Williams: Consuming Higher Education: Why Learning Can’t Be Bought. London, New York: Bloomsbury Academic Press, 2013, ISBN: HB: 978-1-4411-9450-3. Alka Sehgal Cuthbert. 1. Higher Education volume 69, pages161–163(2015)Cite this article.

Joanna is the author of Consuming Higher Education Why Learning Can’t Be Bought (Bloomsbury, 2012) and Academic Freedom in an Age of Conformity (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016). Her most recent book is Women vs Feminism (Emerald, 2017). Joanna has written numerous academic journal articles and book chapters as well as being a frequent contributor to national and international debates on education, feminism and gender politics. She has given many guest lectures, most recently speaking at the Universities of Bonn, Cologne, Leiden and the Freie University in Berline.

To this list Joanna Williams adds another, that of consumerisation. So to offer the statement that learning can’t be bought seems to me to be misguided. In each instance, there are cases (invariably negative) to be made for the changes that are said to have overtaken English higher education in recent decades. Yet at the same time, these questions cannot be addressed without reference to funding, taxation, social privilege and intellectual authority. To take the first of those issues: just one trip down (my) memory lane takes me to being taught seminars by Michael Oakeshott and Ralph Miliband.

Magazine article Times Higher Education The case against these changes in higher education, which Williams here supplies vividly, is not difficult to make, even if some of the snapshots of evidence sh. .

Magazine article Times Higher Education. Consuming Higher Education: Why Learning Can't Be Bought. The case against these changes in higher education, which Williams here supplies vividly, is not difficult to make, even if some of the snapshots of evidence she supplies might well have benefited from including the next frame in the film. For example, those parents anxiously taking leave of their children at the start of their first year are in fact the same furious parents seen at the end of the year chasing missing offspring who have apparently disappeared, leaving behind little more than various forms of compost.

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Colonial Rule of the Philippines and the Making of American Archival History by Cheryl Beredo Ramirez, Mario Hugo.

Consuming Higher Education explores the status of students within the university and society, and the funding and purpose of higher education, drawing on empirical data, UK and USA government policy documents, speeches by policy makers and media representations of students. Joanna Williams moves beyond the debates surrounding fees to consider the impact of the consumption model on universities, learning, knowledge, and student identity. While consumer status initially appears to empower students, Williams argues that it ultimately erodes students' autonomy and reduces learning to an instrumental focus on credit accumulation. At the same time, in giving students consumer status, lecturers are encouraged to avoid intellectually or emotionally challenging content so as not to upset student consumers, which could promote dissatisfaction. Williams draws these themes and arguments together to consider what it means to be a student and to explore alternative conceptions of higher education.



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