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by Lionel S. Lewis,Charles Homer Haskins

  • ISBN: 0765808951
  • Category: Education & Teaching
  • Author: Lionel S. Lewis,Charles Homer Haskins
  • Subcategory: Schools & Teaching
  • Other formats: lrf txt mbr rtf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Transaction Publishers; 1 edition (November 15, 2001)
  • Pages: 134 pages
  • FB2 size: 1822 kb
  • EPUB size: 1729 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 273
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Charles Homer Haskins (December 21, 1870 – May 14, 1937) was a history professor at Harvard University. He was an American historian of the Middle Ages, and advisor to . President Woodrow Wilson.

Charles Homer Haskins (December 21, 1870 – May 14, 1937) was a history professor at Harvard University. He is widely recognized as the first academic medieval historian in the United States. Haskins was born in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He was a prodigy, fluent in both Latin and Greek while still a young boy, taught by his father.

Author(s): Charles Homer Haskins, Lionel S. Lewis (Introduction).

Rise of Universities (Paperback). Published October 31st 2001 by Routledge. Paperback, 180 pages. Author(s): Charles Homer Haskins, Lionel Lewis (Introduction). ISBN: 0765808951 (ISBN13: 9780765808950). Author(s): Charles Homer Haskins, Lionel S.

Rise of Universities book In his new introduction, Lionel S. Lewis develops Haskins' passing observation that "the university of the twentieth cen-tury is the lineal.

Rise of Universities book. At the time of its publication in 1923, Charles Homer Haskins' The Rise of Universities was considered remarkable for its erudition, succinctness, and balance. In his new introduction, Lionel S. Lewis develops Haskins' passing observation that "the university of the twentieth cen-tury is the lineal descendant of mediaeval Paris and Bologna," and considers the question of why universities came into being at the particular time in history when they did.

The republication of Charles Homer Haskins' "The Rise of Universities" is cause for celebration among historians of higher education and among medievalists of all disciplines. Haskins' argument is a powerful one: that today's university system is a direct (and immediate) descendent of the collections of scholars who gathered around master teachers in the great cities of Europe during the twelfth and thirteenth. His] thesis was profound for its time and remains the guiding interpretation of medieval universities.

The rise of universities I the earliest universities u. .They had higher education, but the terms are not synonymous

THE RISE OF UNIVERSITIES I THE EARLIEST UNIVERSITIES U NIVERSITIES, like cathedrals and parliaments, are a product of the Middle Ages. The Greeks and the Romans, strange as it may seem, had no universities in the sense in which the word has been used for the past seven or eight centuries. They had higher education, but the terms are not synonymous. As an historical text-book from one of the youngest of American universities tells us, with an unconscious touch of local color, it had none of the attributes of the material existence which with us are so self-evident.

As Haskins indicated in this book, there was a plurality of Scholasticism.

Lionel S. Lewis is professor emeritus of sociology and adjunct professor of higher education at SUNY/Buffalo. As Haskins indicated in this book, there was a plurality of Scholasticism. In fact, he called the phenomenon "Scholasticisms" Haskins indicated that Medieval Catholic universities were quite informal compared to contemporary structured university systems.

This item:The Rise of Universities by Charles Homer Haskins Paperback . Charles Homer Haskins was born in Meadville, Pennsylvania, in 1870. The fear was extreme skeptism which would undermine any a priori foundations.

Charles Homer Haskins was born in Meadville, Pennsylvania, in 1870. He received his doctorate from The Johns Hopkins University. He taught at Johns Hopkins, the University of Wisconsin, and from 1902 until his retirement in 1931, at Harvard University, where he also served as Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Yet, persecutions and repression were extremely rare according to Haskins.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Rise of Universities. They had higher education, but the terms are not synonymous

Home Browse Books Book details, The Rise of Universities. The Rise of Universities. By Charles Homer Haskins. Much of their instruction in law, rhetoric, and philosophy it would be hard to surpass, but it was not organized into the form of permanent institutions of learning. A great teacher like Socrates gave no diplomas; if a modern student sat at his feet for three months, he would demand a certifi-.

by Charles Homer Haskins. Books related to The Rise of Universities. The Rise of Universities reminds us that the univer-sity has not only been a crucible fostering intellectual inquiry and creativity, but continues after eight hundred years to be a center of teaching and learning. The Rise of the Universiti.

Members of the higher education community tell us about two books they plan to take on holiday: a new must-read .

Members of the higher education community tell us about two books they plan to take on holiday: a new must-read and a classic worthy of a second look. From the opening paragraphs of Rebecca Traister’s All the Single Ladies: Unmarried Women and the Rise of an Independent Nation (Simon & Schuster), I loved this clever, insightful analysis of the changing way that women want to live their lives undefined by their relationships with men. On Jane Eyre: Oh smart resourceful Jane.

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Reviews about The Rise of Universities (Foundations of Higher Education) (7):
Gralsa
Charles Homer Haskins wrote a short but instructive account of the Catholic universities and the Age of Scholastic Learning. As Haskins indicated in this book, there was a plurality of Scholasticism. In fact, he called the phenomenon "Scholasticisms" Haskins indicated that Medieval Catholic universities were quite informal compared to contemporary structured university systems. Haskins also informed the read that what some call The High Middle Ages was a time of the development of parliamentary political and legal systems, Gothic architecture, the beginning of Big Capitalism. etc.

Haskins began this study with a brief description of Catholic university organization. The Medieval University was located where the students and masters (teachers)could rent buildings and arrange accomodations in a city or town. In other words, unlike the modern university campus, there was no campus, no established buidings or grounds, and no specially built facilities. Such European campuses and buildings only began in the late 14th. and 15th. centuries (the late 1300s and 1400s).

Haskins informed his readers that what were called universities were actually guilds of masters and students. Both the masters and students had to be well organized to avoid predatory lending, rents, food prices, etc. Merchants and those who profited from university life were economically forced to lower prices, interest rates, rents, etc. The fact was that students and masters could relocate easily. The local businessmen, landlords, bankers, etc. had to figure that a lower profit was better than no profit.

There were unique characteristics of Medieval universities. The masters taught basic and advanced classes. The universities were international in that all teaching, learning, and scholarship were done in Latin, and students would be admonished or even fined for not using Latin. Students and masters were not confined to one university. Often students would attend lectures at different universities prior to taking examinations at the University of Paris for example. The use of Latin was so prevalent that the area around the University of Paris was and is called the Latin Quarter.

Haskins gave a brief but useful description of the curriculum of Medieval universities. The undergraduate courses were called the Trivium-Rhetoric, Grammar (Latin Grammar, writing, and the classics), and logic. The latter was ususally based on Aristotle's treatises on logic. The Quadrivium consisted of studies of Astronomy, Music (the pensive Gregorian Chant), Plane Geometry, and Arithmetic which may have included algerbra. As some readers may know, these seven areas of study were known as The Seven Liberal Arts. When students successfully finished the complete Liberal Arts curriculum, they could teach the Seven Liberal Arts upon approval of the university chancellor and/or local bishop.

Haskins then gave a brief description of more advanced studies which included Law (Canon Law and Secular Law), Medicine, and Theology. The latter was called Queen of the Sciences and could include 16 years of study. As Haskins mentioned, the University of Paris officials took so much pride in their School of Theology that they forbade the study of secular law. The most honored Regeant Master of Theology of the Catholic Church was St. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274)who attended and then taught at the University of Paris where some historians state he did his best work.

Haskins presented the conditions under which masters taught. If a master could not get five students to attend his class, he was fined. Masters had to be thorough and could not end lectures early. The masters at the University of Bologna in Italy had to get student permission for leaves of absence. The masters were fined for lack of punctually and thoroughness of their teaching. Haskins stated that the masters at the University of Paris got organized into a guild or corporation first and could more easily negotiate with organized students.

Haskins also presented "the other side of the coin" in describing student life. Many students were poor and could not afford books. Books were expensive because they had to be hand copied and well bound. Poorer students had to go to the bookseller and rent sections of the texts. One student started studies in theology, and when his father discovered the cost of a Bible, suggested to his son to study something else. Students did not have ready access to libraries. Learning was based on memory and thinking. Books were so scare and costly, that they were loaned. Haskins made the point that later libraries were the depository of masters' lectures which gradually began to increase in size.

Haskins gave a good description of student behavior and discipline. Some Medieval students were indeed unruly. Students were required to attend Mass. If students missed class for no bona fide reason, they could be fined and in some cases flogged. Haskins suggets that some students visited the pubs and socialized so much that they figured a whipping was well worth it. Haskins also presented a good account of student poetry and a class of students who could be roughly called the Ordo Vagorum. These were wandering students who never finished the curriculum and had too much fun as "professional students." Haskins has brief excerpts of their poetry which should interest readers.

Haskins had some interesting comments about academic freedom. What moderns call academic freedom was prevalent in the Medieval universities. A part of academic life consisted of dispuations, and these debates were lively and intelligent. Masters could enter the realm of discovery and new knowledge. However, the masters could not undermine the intellectual authority of past learning. The fear was extreme skeptism which would undermine any a priori foundations. Yet, persecutions and repression were extremely rare according to Haskins. Haskins also stated he could not find one example of a master or student being persecuted for believing in free trade, socialism, non-violence, etc. Such views have resulted in political overtones and repression during the 20th. and now 21st. century. Haskins is also clear that teaching and learning were taken very seriously during the Middle Ages. Politically correct nonsense and sloppy thinking would have been scorned. Learning and reasoned debate were honored which has disappeared from much of contomporay university life. The demand on students to read and think was intense.

Haskins confined much of this book to the University of Bologna which may started as early as 1158 if not earlier. According to Haskins, the first Medieval university may have been at Salerno as early 1076. The focus of Haskins' book is the study of the University of Bologna and the University which is enough for the beginning student of Medieval univerities.

This is short book, but it is well written. For anyone who wants to know more Haskins provided an excellent bibliography. Haskins' book makes a connenction between Medieval universities and modern universities. Readers should know there is a connection. Unfortately too many "experts" argue that earlier events and men were from the moon when in fact, they were historical events and individuals who should be studied and appreciated.
Uthergo
This is a positively marvelous monograph on the early university. Divided into three sections, the university, the teachers, and the students, we are provided with a fascinating picture of medieval higher education.
Xtintisha
Although rather brief in terms of length, it is based upon Haskins's three lectures, this book provides an excellent basic source for information relating to the founding and rise of the university in Western Europe. The university remains one of the greatest achievements of the Middle Ages and this book allows one access to a basic understanding of their establishment. Additional sources of supplemental readings are provided for the student of education wishing to delve deeper into this subject. Well presented and quite resourceful.
Frdi
A gem.
playboy
I was very happy with this purchase. I am still reading it but so far it has answered many of the questions I had about the origins of universities. I'm very happy with it.
interactive man
Very good, but not long enough.
Perius
Thank you
Written in the early 1900s and sort of elitist sounding.

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