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by Adam Glass,Shawn Martinbrough,Mike Benson

  • ISBN: 0785135456
  • Category: Comics & Graphic
  • Author: Adam Glass,Shawn Martinbrough,Mike Benson
  • Subcategory: Graphic Novels
  • Other formats: txt lrf docx lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Marvel (August 18, 2010)
  • Pages: 112 pages
  • FB2 size: 1325 kb
  • EPUB size: 1301 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 759
Download Luke Cage Noir fb2

Kudos must also go to Shawn Martinbrough, for successfully capturing the spirit of Harlem in the 1920s and of Film Noir in his wonderful illustrations.

Ships from and sold by books-fyi. Ships from and sold by aepbooks. Kudos must also go to Shawn Martinbrough, for successfully capturing the spirit of Harlem in the 1920s and of Film Noir in his wonderful illustrations. In truth, I could imagine Bogart in this movie. I’ll let others decide which role(s) might best utilize his talents, and we can then compare notes.

Luke Cage: Noir works so hard to make sure you don't forget it's a noir story that you might forget that it could . Benson and Glass re-imagine the modern day super-hero Luke Cage as a man inhabiting New York City in the 1920s.

Luke Cage: Noir works so hard to make sure you don't forget it's a noir story that you might forget that it could be a good story.

After reading Luke Cage: Noir, I may need to amend that definition slightly. The basic plot: Luke Cage is released from prison (for a crime he did not commit) after allegedly agreeing to undergo a series of medical experiments

After reading Luke Cage: Noir, I may need to amend that definition slightly. The basic plot: Luke Cage is released from prison (for a crime he did not commit) after allegedly agreeing to undergo a series of medical experiments. He arrives back in New York City and must decide how to put the pieces of his life back together and what to do with all of the tomorrows to come.

Moon Over Harlem" (with Adam Glass and Shawn Martinbrough, in 2009). A Harlem Sunset" (with Adam Glass and Shawn Martinbrough, in 2009).

Kudos must also go to Shawn Martinbrough, for successfully capturing the spirit of Harlem in the 1920s and of Film Noir in his wonderful illustrations.

A lot can change in ten years. And rarely for the better. Wrtten by Mike Benson and Adam Glass, Luke Cage Noir was part of Marvel’s short lived Noir imprint that featured alternate versions of Marvel characters in noir setting. Luke Cage Noir was also collected as part of Marvel Noir: Daredevil/Cage/Iron Man and features art by Shawn Martinbrough.

Luke Cage Noir - Premiere (Hardback). Mike Benson (author of text), Adam Glass (author of text), Shawn Martinbrough (illustrator).

In 2009, Martinbrough teamed with writers Mike Benson and Adam Glass on the four-issue limited series Luke Cage Noir. Since 2012, Martinbrough has been the artist of the monthly series Thief of Thieves, co-written by Robert Kirkman and published by Image Comics/Skybound Entertainment. Kirkman chose Martinbrough because of his "cinematic flair" and ability to "portray characters realistically.

Penciller: Shawn Martinbrough. Luke Cage returns to the streets of Prohibition-era Harlem after a stretch in prison. Luke Cage Noir Glass, Martinbrough. Willis Stryker, Cage's friend turned Godfather of Harlem, wants him on his crew and wealthy socialite Randall Banticoff wants Cage to investigate his wife's death. Read Now. Luke Cage Noir Benson, Martinbrough. Luke Cage Noir Premiere.

Shawn Martinbrough is the author of "How to Draw Noir Comics: The Art and Technique of Visual Storytelling" .

Shawn is a critically acclaimed artist and creator whose DC Comics work includes a two year collaboration with novelist Greg Rucka on "Batman: Detective Comics. Shawn's graphic novel projects for Marvel Entertainment include Luke Cage Noir, Black Panther: The Most Dangerous Man Alive and a "Captain America" graphic novel for the . Army & Air Force Exchange Service.

by Mike Benson · Adam Glass · Shawn Martinbrough. It's the Merc with a Mouth in a pulp caper filled with lies, spies and shapely thighs, courtesy of Mike Benson & Adam Glass (Deadpool: Suicide Kings, Luke Cage Noir) and Laurence Campbell (Punisher)! Wade Wilson. A lot can change in ten years. Local legend, Luke Cage, invincible, unstoppable, unflappable, finds that out the hard way when he returns to the mean streets of Prohibition-era Harlem after a ten-year stretch in Riker's Island. Batman: Streets of Gotham - Leviathan. He's the CIA's dea. Captain America: Prisoner of War.

In 1930s Harlem, Luke Cage, fresh out of prison, tries to find out what happened to his girlfriend Josephine while he was in prison, and takes a case involving the death of a white socialite on behalf of her widower.
Reviews about Luke Cage Noir (7):
Thomand
This is the second of Marvel's "Noir" titles I've read, after Daredevil Noir. It will likely be the last.

The problem with Luke Cage Noir is that it could have been so much more. Setting Luke Cage in Prohibition Harlem, at the height of the Jazz Age, is a natural. He keeps elements of the Luke Cage we know: he's a good man, he's done time but he's not guilty of anything other than standing up for himself and ignoring the unwritten rules that favor the strong over the weak.

Unfortunately, the Noir title keeps the thing that makes the original Luke Cage: Hero for Hire feel so dated. The original Luke Cage could talk jive with the best of them, as Marvel reached out to a more "urban" audience; read it now, and it feels like you're thrown in the middle of a blaxploitation flick. It feels dated, but at least the writers were using the contemporary jive. Like Cage Noir reads like the writers are more concerned with it sounding like a dime store idea of a noir tale, with the result that you never can lose yourself in the story. Making the characters "sound noir" distracts from what could have been a great tale.

Marvel has done decent period pieces: 1602 was a lot of fun, very well written, and Immortal Iron Fist vol. 2 (and or 3) has back story set in this time period, without getting weighed down by the trappings of genre. Luke Cage: Noir works so hard to make sure you don't forget it's a noir story that you might forget that it could be a good story.
Umrdana
This brings me back to a time in the 80's and 90's where there were great movies about harkens black renaissance and the gangsters as well as hard good guys out there as well. A story akin to shaft. It's a fun read and just gritty enough.
Kabandis
The black and white art is absolutely gorgious and perfect for the tone and time period of the story. This is well written and has the advantage of making perfect sense to someone who knows nothing about Marvel or Powerman, as it is stand alone.
Reighbyra
Great read, gives you a lot of background about Luke Cage.
Dugor
A brand new mythos of Luke Cage. Great add to action figure collection. Also great add to graphic novel collection.
Water
My usual definition of "noir" involves "can I picture Humphrey Bogart playing one or more roles in the movie version". After reading Luke Cage: Noir, I may need to amend that definition slightly.

The basic plot: Luke Cage is released from prison (for a crime he did not commit) after allegedly agreeing to undergo a series of medical experiments. He arrives back in New York City and must decide how to put the pieces of his life back together and what to do with all of the tomorrows to come. (This overview may sound familiar to readers of the modern day "Hero for Hire".) Cage is hired by a Randall Banticoff to investigate the murder of his young wife. Before addressing the "whodunit" aspect of the situation, the first part of the mystery is: why was a white woman found dead in Harlem, of all places? The second: why was she killed? Then, maybe, we can address identifying the culprit.
Benson and Glass re-imagine the modern day super-hero Luke Cage as a man inhabiting New York City in the 1920s. They successfully use this tableau to view and comment upon racial non-equality of the period, and how prohibition caused much social upheaval than simply whether or not one could buy a drink legally.

Perhaps my only quibble with the work is that the limited use of existing Marvel Universe characters redefined in a new environment seemed to actually distract from the material, rather than instilling a bit of fun in it as did Gaiman's Marvel 1602. Then again, from a marketing standpoint, this move was probably a necessity - I, for one, probably would have passed by this work on the shelf had the tie-in to Luke Cage not caught my eye.
Kudos must also go to Shawn Martinbrough, for successfully capturing the spirit of Harlem in the 1920s and of Film Noir in his wonderful illustrations.

P.S. In truth, I could imagine Bogart in this movie. I'll let others decide which role(s) might best utilize his talents, and we can then compare notes.

RATING: 5 stars.
Cobyno
My usual definition of “noir” involves “can I picture Humphrey Bogart playing one or more roles in the movie version”. After reading Luke Cage: Noir, I may need to amend that definition slightly.

The basic plot: Luke Cage is released from prison (for a crime he did not commit) after allegedly agreeing to undergo a series of medical experiments. He arrives back in New York City and must decide how to put the pieces of his life back together and what to do with all of the tomorrows to come. (This overview may sound familiar to readers of the modern day “Hero for Hire”.) Cage is hired by a Randall Banticoff to investigate the murder of his young wife. Before addressing the “whodunit” aspect of the situation, the first part of the mystery is: why was a white woman found dead in Harlem, of all places? The second: why was she killed? Then, maybe, we can address identifying the culprit.

Benson and Glass re-imagine the modern day super-hero Luke Cage as a man inhabiting New York City in the 1920s. They successfully use this tableau to view and comment upon racial non-equality of the period, and how prohibition caused much social upheaval than simply whether or not one could buy a drink legally.

Perhaps my only quibble with the work is that the limited use of existing Marvel Universe characters redefined in a new environment seemed to actually distract from the material, rather than instilling a bit of fun in it as did Gaiman’s Marvel 1602. Then again, from a marketing standpoint, this move was probably a necessity – I, for one, probably would have passed by this work on the shelf had the tie-in to Luke Cage not caught my eye.

Kudos must also go to Shawn Martinbrough, for successfully capturing the spirit of Harlem in the 1920s and of Film Noir in his wonderful illustrations.

P.S. In truth, I could imagine Bogart in this movie. I’ll let others decide which role(s) might best utilize his talents, and we can then compare notes.

RATING: 5 stars.

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