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by Warren Pleece,Mat Johnson

  • ISBN: 1401210988
  • Category: Comics & Graphic
  • Author: Warren Pleece,Mat Johnson
  • Subcategory: Graphic Novels
  • Other formats: rtf mobi lrf azw
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Vertigo (June 2, 2009)
  • Pages: 136 pages
  • FB2 size: 1691 kb
  • EPUB size: 1924 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 635
Download Incognegro: A Graphic Mystery fb2

By Mat Johnson Illustrated by Warren Pleece.

By Mat Johnson Illustrated by Warren Pleece. By Mat Johnson Illustrated by Warren Pleece. Category: Graphic Novels & Manga. In the early 20th Century, when lynchings were commonplace throughout the American South, a few courageous reporters from the North risked their lives to expose these atrocities.

In addition to Johnson's writing, the artwork was simplistic (in a good way) with clean lines.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Incognegro a Graphic Mystery Book Pleece Warren .

Incognegro: A Graphic Mystery . Incognegro is Mat Johnson’s and Warren Pleece’s almost-true-story based on Walter White, the former head of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), who went undercover to investigate lynchings.

This title will be released on October 16, 2018. Johnson and Pleece have done a mostly commendable job, though the plot gets too knotted for its own good long before the conclusion, but they give a cracking Chester Himes kick to what could have been a sub–Walter Mosley imitation.

And the debut of Incognegro: Renaissance, a new prequel series set in the Harlem Renaissance

And the debut of Incognegro: Renaissance, a new prequel series set in the Harlem Renaissance.

Genres: Graphic Novels, Mystery. Artist: Warren Pleece. Publication date: February 2008 - June 2009. Publisher: DC Comics. Incognegro is the story of a light-skinned African-American reporter, who poses as a white man to expose the racism and corruption around him. Issue(s).

Books Books of The Times The inspiration for Incognegro comes from the personal and professional . The ultimate examples of passing are tied to the central mystery and the coup de grâce of Incognegro, both of which are best not revealed here.

Books Books of The Times. Black and White and Graphic All Over: A 1930s Tale of Race, Passing and Pain. By george gene gustinesmarch 3, 2008. Continue reading the main story. The inspiration for Incognegro comes from the personal and professional experience of its writer, Mat Johnson. The author’s note reveals that Mr. Johnson, as a young boy, could pass for white and would act out missions as a race spy in the war against white supremacy.

Comics & Graphic Novels. Rate it . You Rated it . Back to Comics & Graphic Novels. Suspenseful, unsettling and relevant, Incognegro is a tense graphic novel of shifting identities, forbidden passions, and secrets that run far deeper than skin color.

Incognegro is a black-and-white graphic novel written by Mat Johnson with art by Warren Pleece. It was published by DC Comics imprint Vertigo

Incognegro is a black-and-white graphic novel written by Mat Johnson with art by Warren Pleece. It was published by DC Comics imprint Vertigo. The book was published by Vertigo in February 2008 as a hardcover (. ISBN 1-4012-1097-X) and in June 2009 as a softcover volume (. ISBN 1-4420-0200-X). Titan Books also released British versions, the softcover in June 2009 (. ISBN 1848560974) and the hardcover in August of the same year (.

Writer Mat Johnson (HELLBLAZER: PAPA MIDNITE), winner of the prestigious Hurston-Wright Legacy Award for fiction, constructs a fearless graphic novel that is both a page-turning mystery and a disturbing exploration of race and self-image in America, masterfully illustrated with rich period detail by Wareen Pleece (THE INVISIBLES, HELLBLAZER). In the early 20th Century, when lynchings were commonplace throughout the American South, a few courageous reporters from the North risked their lives to expose these atrocities. They were African-American men who, due to their light skin color, could "pass" among the white folks. They called this dangerous assignment going "incognegro."Zane Pinchback, a reporter for the New York-based New Holland Herald barely escapes with his life after his latest "incognegro" story goes bad. But when he returns to the sanctuary of Harlem, he's sent to investigate the arrest of his own brother, charged with the brutal murder of a white woman in Mississippi. With a lynch mob already swarming, Zane must stay "incognegro" long enough to uncover the truth behind the murder in order to save his brother — and himself. He finds that the answers are buried beneath layers of shifting identities, forbidden passions and secrets that run far deeper than skin color.
Reviews about Incognegro: A Graphic Mystery (7):
fetish
A graphic novel version of brutal American history watered down. At least it is out. The wound is still fresh and those responsible have yet to pay for these atrocities. Courageous people exposed the horrible terrors perpetuated by Caucasians on Blacks AND they want all to forget and yet in this day and age it is still repeated in many other heinous 'legal' forms. Good book.
Dondallon
I am an avid reader and buyer of graphic novels, and any other books that interest me. All around, I am a solitary person whose hobby is reading books. I stumbled upon this title as I was searching through comics and the cover really peaked my interest. So I bought it and from the moment I opened the first page and began reading, I was on the edge if my seat with emotion. I laughed, grew suspenseful, and was surprised as I read Incognegro. Mat Johnson, if you ever read this, I will be buying more of your work. There is more Incognegro series being produced and I will preorder it. But in summary, buy this book it was great!
Tekasa
Definitely enjoyed this graphic novel. I like how the graphic novel format is really opening itself up to be a mode of storytelling that achieves so much more than a novel would. I loved seeing a character like Zane imagined in the time period Mat Johnson chose. I also enjoyed it because Johnson didn't shy away from making Zane (and even his brother) problematic in their views of women. He stayed true to the time period of how most men viewed women, and gave those views to our hero, which helps make him more complex and sometimes difficult. The discussion questions at the end of the graphic novel helped open up my experience of the story and allowed me to think more deeply about it.
Rich Vulture
I thought this was a powerful read. While it doesn't have the visual and narrative complexity of some of the more full-fledged graphic "novels," it works very well as a more straightforward comic book that still has an important story to tell. Some of the content is graphic in another sense, as in, shockingly violent. But it's actually less violent than such things as superhero comics. The shock comes because the events depicted here really happened. Lynchings and horrific abuse of black people were just as bad, and often far worse, than the ways they're depicted here. And people really did keep and trade photos and postcards of these hellish "picnics."

The story is fast-paced and gripping--I kept reading to find out what would happen next. However, in this war between blacks and whites, the white people are a little too uniformly evil. I thought there was some hope for one in particular, but he turned out to be almost as much of a sicko as the rest of the Southern "crackers." A white character with some depth and humanity would have made the story less starkly . . . well, black and white.

I was led by this reading to learn more about Walter White, a real-life investigator who did even more dramatically heroic undercover work against murderous racism than this book's fictional hero performs. The recovered history in this book, and its invitation to remember more of it, is the most valuable part for me. Thank you Mr. Johnson and Mr. Pleece for infusing a format aimed at young people with such serious and relevant, yet also engaging, content.
Ferne
Incognegro might be set in the past but unfortunately it still feels very relevent today. A remarkable look at a side of the Civil Rights fight that doesn’t get enough attention in pop culture. Heartbreaking, tragic and triumphant all describe this great book
Adrietius
The other reviews here have summed up "Incognegro" well-- this well-paced graphic novel by Mat Johnson deftly explores racism in the South and the steps that one courageous newspaperman takes to combat it. I was fascinated by how the book tackled "passing"; black men and women who can easily disguise themselves as white folk.

In addition to Johnson's writing, the artwork was simplistic (in a good way) with clean lines. I liked that the book was black-and-white, further blurring the nature of race within the story.
Gogul
This book is well worth the purchase price. It succeeds as a noir murder mystery, social commentary, and as an indictment of social mores. This story is disturbingly, intuitively realistic in its portrayal of upscale Black life (the title character is a reporter for a Black newspaper) - which at the time had certain humiliatingly rigid similarities with Black life no matter the class, educational background, or economic station. The artwork in this tome is chillingly perfect for the tale told. Interestingly, there seem to be some direct parallels between the era portrayed in this riveting novel, and present-day American society, which the author subtly draws, as his story-telling prowess is displayed to good end in this great graphic novel. This book is a must-buy, must-read, must-share, must talk-about; for Americans of all walks!
Incognegro was a refreshing experience. I enjoyed the dialogue and the artwork, as well as the emersion into an Afro-American-centric storyline. The story recognized the limitations of one man in a society that was pre-disposed against him. It recognized that the main character could not right every wrong or find justice for every atrocity, but at the same time, the familiar phrase coined by Spider-Man kept coming into my mind as I read about this light-skinned brother--"With Great Power comes Great Responsibility." The main character put himself in harm's way for the good of his race and the exposure of the ugly truth. The story put me in the mind of a movie called Black Like Me, where a white journalist disguises himself as black and goes undercover in the South; although he did not face the same dangers as in Incognegro. Even though I grew up on comic books, this was my first graphic novel that I've read in a long time. The only criticism that I can give is that many of the characters are stereotypes themselves, but the story was still entertaining.

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