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by John Howard Yoder

  • ISBN: 0802814859
  • Category: Christian Books
  • Author: John Howard Yoder
  • Subcategory: Theology
  • Other formats: doc lrf lit lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Eerdmans, William [email protected] (November 1, 1972)
  • Pages: 260 pages
  • FB2 size: 1936 kb
  • EPUB size: 1163 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 940
Download Politics of Jesus fb2

John Howard Yoder's "The Politics of Jesus" is a classic of 20th century American theological thought

John Howard Yoder's "The Politics of Jesus" is a classic of 20th century American theological thought. Within the text, Yoder seeks to demonstrate how the life of Jesus was one that was involved in the politics of the day. Moving step by step, Yoder systematically shows that the idea of an apolitical Jesus who was unconcerned with the institutions and situations of this present world is false and not found in the Biblical narrative. He begins his work by summarizing the basic position of many scholars that Jesus' ethic cannot be normative for Christians.

John Howard Yoder (December 29, 1927 – December 30, 1997) was an American theologian and ethicist best known for his defense of Christian pacifism. His most influential book was The Politics of Jesus, which was first published in 1972

John Howard Yoder (December 29, 1927 – December 30, 1997) was an American theologian and ethicist best known for his defense of Christian pacifism. His most influential book was The Politics of Jesus, which was first published in 1972. Yoder was a liberal Mennonite and wrote from an Anabaptist perspective. He spent the latter part of his career teaching at the University of Notre Dame.

John Howard Yoder’s work The Politics of Jesus has been recommended to me on more than one occasion, and after reading it I can understand why. This book, originally published in 1972, and later revised and updated in 1994, still speaks powerfully today

John Howard Yoder’s work The Politics of Jesus has been recommended to me on more than one occasion, and after reading it I can understand why. This book, originally published in 1972, and later revised and updated in 1994, still speaks powerfully today. There have been few books in my life that I have wrestled with, engaged with, and sought to dig deeper into than this book.

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Years after the death of John Howard Yoder, many Mennonites still grapple with the . In his teaching at Notre Dame and elsewhere, and in books like The Politics of Jesus, published in 1972, Mr. Yoder, a Mennonite Christian, helped thousands formulate their opposition to violence.

Years after the death of John Howard Yoder, many Mennonites still grapple with the conflict between his beliefs and his behavior toward women. Yet, as he admitted before his death in 1997, he groped many women or pressured them to have physical contact, although never sexual intercourse. Mr. Yoder’s scholarly pre-eminence keeps growing, and with it the ambivalence that Mennonites and other Christians feel toward him.

In The Politics of Jesus, John H. Yoder argues that mainline ethicists have falsely assumed that the Jesus in the gospels fails to. .THE POLITICS OF JESUS, first written over a quarter century ago, retains it's freshness. Yoder argues that mainline ethicists have falsely assumed that the Jesus in the gospels fails to present us with a normative social ethic.

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But such a picture of Jesus is far from accurate, argues John Howard Yoder.

But such a picture of Jesus is far from accurate, argues John Howard Yoder. Using the texts of the New Testament, Yoder critically examines the traditional portrait of Jesus as an apolitical figure and attempts to clarify the true impact of Jesus' life, work, and teachings on his disciples' social behavior

Jesus Christ, Jesus Christ, Social ethics, Pacifism. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by CarriC on June 2, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

John Howard Yoder (1926-1997), a highly influential Mennonite theologian, was Professor of Theology and Teaching Fellow in the Joan B. Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame. He is best known for his 1972 magnum opus The Politics of Jesus, as well as The Original Revolution: Essays on Christian Pacifism, The Priestly Kingdom, and The Royal Priesthood, among others. Библиографические данные. The Politics of Jesus: Vicit Agnus Noster. Издание: перепечатанное.

Tradition has painted a portrait of a Savior who stands aloof from governmental concerns and who calls his disciples to an apolitical life. But such a picture of Jesus is far from accurate, according to John Howard Yoder. This watershed work in New Testament ethics leads us to a Savior who was deeply concerned with the agenda of politics and the related issues of power, status, and right relations. By canvassing Luke's Gospel, Yoder argues convincingly that the true impact of Jesus' life and ministry on his disciples' social behavior points to a specific kind of Christian pacifism in which "the cross of Christ is the model of Christian social efficacy." This second edition of The Politics of Jesus provides up-to-date interaction with recent publications that touch on Yoder's timely topic. Following most of the chapters are new "epilogues" summarizing research conducted during the last two decades - research that continues to support the outstanding insights set forth in Yoder's original work.
Reviews about Politics of Jesus (7):
Ericaz
Needed it for school
Broadraven
Very thought provoking. Much appreciated.
Jogas
Superb! The content is solid and has depth while the writing is very logical and well structured. So its easy to follow the argument. It’s also very ‘real’ and theologically sound. A
Moswyn
little hard to read had to pass it on to my pastor
Rainpick
John Howard Yoder's "The Politics of Jesus" is a classic of 20th century American theological thought. Within the text, Yoder seeks to demonstrate how the life of Jesus was one that was involved in the politics of the day. Moving step by step, Yoder systematically shows that the idea of an apolitical Jesus who was unconcerned with the institutions and situations of this present world is false and not found in the Biblical narrative.
He begins his work by summarizing the basic position of many scholars that Jesus' ethic cannot be normative for Christians. While he points out six incorrect views of Jesus' ethic, the one that receives the most attention throughout the book is the view purported by Albert Schweitzer, that of an interim ethic that is not valid because Jesus thought that the world would end soon. Yoder then begins to demonstrate his claim of a political Jesus by moving into a survey of the Gospel of Luke. He highlights key points within the text that seek to show that Jesus was not only not an apolitical figure, but that his primary goal during his ministry, death, and resurrection was a reconstruction of the social order. A particular point of Yoder's is that Jesus was trying to reinstitute the year of Jubilee, the year in the Israelite nation where debts are remitted, slaves are set free, and the land is allowed to be fallow so that it can heal. Yoder then makes an excursus of sorts for two chapters, analyzing how God is the one who fights for Israel in the Old Testament and that there were instances of successful non-violent resistance in the 1st Century Mediterranean world among the Jews. This is done of course to show how neither the Old Testament nor the contemporary world of Jesus would contradict his teachings on pacifism. Yoder then moves to addressing key misunderstandings that Christians often have when looking at Jesus' life. He argues for a balance to be struck, saying that it is wrong for the social ethic to be ignored in favor of a personal morality.
In chapter 7 Yoder moves away from the gospel narrative to the apostolic witness within the New Testament, showing how the apostles felt that the Christian life and ethic was best demonstrated in the life of Christ. The following chapter is how Christ dealt with the stoichea or powers in his death and resurrection, resulting in a view that is quite similar to Gustaf Aulen's Christus Victor. He then makes the claim that the gospel message was one that promoted equality and frames the Haustafeln or "household precepts" around that. He then logically proceeds to Romans 13 and argues that the Christian should be subject to the state, but that does not mean the Christian must do everything the state requires. He then addresses justification by grace and argues that it was primarily the restoration or reconciliation of individuals. His final chapter addresses the eschaton and how Christians should be living in light of it. We should accept powerlessness as Christ accepted powerlessness, because He has already conquered and will return to finish what was started.
It is quite evident that Yoder sits firmly in the Anabaptist tradition and is at home with Menno Simons as well as early church figures such as Tertullian and Origen. He stands in opposition to many of his earlier contemporaries from the 19th and 20th centuries. You do not find the postmillennial-type hope of Rauschenbusch or Abbott--the world is sinful according Yoder and this will not change until the Second Advent. There is also, however, a direct challenge to the thought of Reinhold Niebuhr, who claimed that precisely because the world is sinful the ethic of Jesus will never be realized. This too is false according to Yoder, as we are supposed to be faithful to our calling and identity.
The logical progression of the text is to establish Christ and then establish how we should act. The majority of his scriptural references come from either the Gospel of Luke or the Epistolary literature. He does make reference briefly to both Romans 13 and parts of the Old Testament, but by and large he focuses primarily upon Jesus and the apostolic thought that deals with him.
While the book as a whole is a success, there are some problems with the text. The biggest problem by and large is Yoder's methodology. He is inconsistent in his application of Biblical texts, primarily the Old Testament. He cannot argue for a discontinuity between the Old and the New Testament without hurting his case, primarily in the fact that God fights for believers. While Yoder is correct in the Old Testament passages that he addresses, he ignores the vast body of texts from the Old Testament that deal with the establishment of the social order and warfare in a positive light. While it is true that in the Old Testament narrative God was against the establishment of the human monarchy, He still allows it and provides orderly rules. Also, there are large-scale wars present in the Old Testament that are ordered and approved of by God. Why Yoder chose to not address this is not mentioned, but it does hurt his case for pacifism. He is also over-reliant on the Gospel of Luke to make his points. He does say in his first chapter that he could make the same points outside of that particular gospel, but one must wonder why there is no direct quotations from the other portraits of Jesus in the New Testament. While he is correct in his assessment of justification through grace in part, it cannot be argued that it is primarily one of reconciliation between individuals. It is rather as the Gospel of John puts it: reconciliation between God and the World. This does not deny the social dimension that Yoder argues for, but it also addresses the personal dimension which he seems to exclude to a degree and the cosmic implications of redemption.
Another point of critique is Yoder's position chapter 8, "Christ and Power". He interprets the stoichea in the Pauline epistles to mean only the social institutions of the world. While this is a valid and acceptable interpretation, there are many scholars who would argue that Paul did have in mind not only the social institutions of the world but the quite real demonic forces behind them as well. Neither interpretation can be directly derived from the text, but rather deals with one's hermeneutic. His interpretation of Romans 13 is somewhat of a stretch as well. While there is much to agree with about his interpretation, his positing that the sword refers not to death but restraint is not a position that can be derived from the text without some form of exegetical acrobatics. He derives his position not from the text but rather from his presuppositions and sometimes is clearly in the wrong, such as his statement that the Romans only crucified their criminals (203). The sword, like the spear, was a weapon of warfare and was an Old Testament symbol of God's judgment upon various nations, especially the ones that were annihilated in the conquest tradition of Joshua and Judges. It is not accurate to the context of the society to say that warfare and death are not in mind at all in Paul's usage of the word.
While there are some points in the book that are wrong or not as strong as the author would like, the book as a whole is a success and goes great lengths to show that the ethic of Jesus is the ethic that we should have today.
Nikohn
Very good reference / resource materiel.
Era
I studied Christianity as an outsider, a non-believer. This book was the first glimpse of Jesus that made sense to me, and it changed the way I view both Jesus and the Bible. It made me a believer. Even more than that, it points the way toward hope for our fallen world. Yoder presents a Christology that is not only radical, but entirely practical for our modern world.
Yoder, in this and his other books, spells out the 100 per cent pacifist
(no use of military force) position the best of any of them I have read.
He took the Bible seriously. I gave him a fair reading, in this and his other
books, although I conclude other than he did. He was strongly for diplomacy and
peace-making, and is an encouragement for those who do this and for those
who support this.

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