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by Dave Tomlinson

  • ISBN: 0310253853
  • Category: Christian Books
  • Author: Dave Tomlinson
  • Subcategory: Churches & Church Leadership
  • Other formats: txt lit doc rtf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Zondervan/Youth Specialties; Revised edition (September 9, 2003)
  • Pages: 160 pages
  • FB2 size: 1558 kb
  • EPUB size: 1961 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 536
Download The Post-Evangelical (Emergent YS) fb2

The Post-Evangelical book

The Post-Evangelical book. Where Emergent leaders come into conflict with those doctrines, and they sometimes do, they're in danger and potentially dangerous. I say this not because I dismiss their ideas, but because I take them very seriously. The primary weakness of this book is that Tomlinson continually defines Post-Evangelicalism in terms of its contrast with, and implied superiority to, something else. As a result, it never stops defining traditional Evangelicalism from its own hyper-sensitive, critical (and frankly condescending, sometimes graceless) point of view.

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You believe in the God of the Bible--but you cringe when church leaders oversimplify, trivialize, and absolutize the faith. This book was published in 1995 and although still very acute and with some useful points it does somehow feel dated.

The Post-Evangelical. Ground-breaking and hugely controversial on first publication in 1995, this classic text pre-empted the emerging church movement, questioning whether the certainties of evangelical orthodoxy could survive in a postmodern world. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Most who describe themselves as post-evangelical are still adherents of the Christian faith in some form. YouTube Encyclopedic. Criticisms of evangelicalism. Some post-evangelical criticisms of the evangelical church include but are not limited to

Ground-breaking and hugely controversial on first publication in 1995, this classic text pre-empted the emerging church.

Many evangelical denominations split over slavery, with evangelicals in the southern United States establishing .

Many evangelical denominations split over slavery, with evangelicals in the southern United States establishing new branches that did not formally or openly call for abolition of slavery The term neo-evangelicalism was coined by Harold Ockenga in 1947 to identify a distinct movement within self-identified fundamentalist Christianity at the time, especially in the English-speaking world.

Atonement in Christianity. Constructive theology.

The Post-Evangelical: SPCK Classic with a new Preface. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: SPCKReleased: Jul 17, 2014ISBN: 9780281073108Format: book. The Post-Evangelical - Dave Tomlinson

You believe in the God of the Bible---but you cringe when church leaders oversimplify, trivialize, and absolutize the faith. You're not alone. You're likely among an increasing number of post-evangelicals: Christians growing restless within the bounds of the evangelical orthodoxy they were raised in or trained in---especially its culturally-influenced precepts and mores---and thirsting for something deeper. Something that makes sense. Author Dave Tomlinson encountered these same issues in Great Britain as he approached the writing of The Post-Evangelical. He quickly discovered that many in the church are hungering for a safe place to express their questions, doubts, and insights without being branded 'liberals' or---worse yet---'heretics.' Far from skewering its subject, The Post-Evangelical actually endorses steps toward rather that away from the roots of evangelicalism---while stridently challenging its man-made rules and regulations that have, for all intents and purposes, become 'gospel.' A best-seller and paradigm-buster in the U.K. for several years, we now present the expanded and updated North American edition of The Post-Evangelical. It includes: * A forward by Dallas Willard and an updated introduction. * Sidebar commentary from Mark Galli, Timothy Keel, Doug Pagitt, Mike Yaconelli, and Holly Rankin Zaher. * A completely new chapter on the history of evangelicalism in the U.S. If you've wandered from the evangelical fold---publicly or privately---you're not necessarily a backslider. Spend some time with The Post-Evangelical and be encouraged.
Reviews about The Post-Evangelical (Emergent YS) (7):
LeXXXuS
I've read two books by Brian McLaren and number of others by authors associated with the Emergent movement. For a time I was regularly reading a few Emergent blogs. I think it is particularly appealing to those of us who come from church backgrounds where everyone seemed to be fighting mad at all times.

I felt I got a better look at the trajectory of the movement from "The Post-Evangelical", and I would have to say that this book sobered me up a bit. McLaren's books were at least as attractive as they were concerning to me. Tomlinson, writing to a much more progressive British readership, wasn't as effectively and meticulously disarming.

None of us can stand outside of church history. We're products of it. Few of us want to concede how impacted our interpretations of the Bible are by our times, our influences, and our own preferences. Many of us have wasted a lot of time trying to fit complex issues into polemic or political or denominational boxes, while neglecting "the more important matters of the law--justice, mercy and faithfulness."

But many of the doctrines we hold to as conservative Evangelicals (to use a passé term) are demonstrably primal. They were spoken by our Lord, documented by the apostles, and observed in the earliest churches. Where Emergent leaders come into conflict with those doctrines, and they sometimes do, they're in danger and potentially dangerous. I say this not because I dismiss their ideas, but because I take them very seriously.

The primary weakness of this book is that Tomlinson continually defines Post-Evangelicalism in terms of its contrast with, and implied superiority to, something else. As a result, it never stops defining traditional Evangelicalism from its own hyper-sensitive, critical (and frankly condescending, sometimes graceless) point of view. There seems to be almost no awareness that a great many Evangelicals are completely acquainted with the issues he has noted, yet are able to contend with them without becoming disillusioned or feeling like they need to reshape the church in their own image. To be completely honest, I have no desire to join a Charismatic or Fundamentalist Baptist congregation. But I don't think that they all need to be enlightened by my preferences!

I live in the postmodern era. I grew up in it. I understand the tension between rational and poetic thinking. I navigate it every single day. I find I need both modes, in equal measure. The Post-Evangelical half of the equation, as defined here, is inadequate to address the whole of life. Continually pitting the postmodern/poetic against the modern/scientific is an approach that will quickly come up short for any reader, regardless of his or her perspective. Life contains math. Life contains love. We require both the scientific and the poetic every day.

I'm grateful to the Emergent movement for the gut check, but I'm still convinced that our new postmodern world needs John MacArthur just as much as it needs Brian McLaren.
Acrobat
I read the British edition of Tomlinson's book a while back and can recommend it without reservation. He points out the many weaknesses of modern Evangelicalism for thinking persons (or even deeply feeling persons) and tries to plot a course toward something greater and more in tune with the Spirit. I liked the fact that he was not afraid to go after sacred cows like inerrancy, a modern attribute forced onto a premodern text, while so many other 'postmodern' Christian authors seem caught up in worrying about worship and preaching styles: the problem goes much deeper than the hipness of your pop culture connections, whether you have video screens in your church, or whether you preach in a relational style.

The American edition, however, has been published by Zondervan, a very conservative, borderline fundamentalist publisher. While Zondervan can be congratulated for having the nerve to publish the book at all, they end up handicapping Tomlinson's arguments by adding a running commentary in the margins from several figures in the American emergent church movement. Some of these commentators, like Timothy Keel and Doug Pagitt, have some interesting things to say about how the British Post-Evangelical movement relates to the US Emergent movement. Others are less helpful. Mark Galli, an editor for Christianity Today and Leadership, gives stock 'Christianity Inc' answers for many of Tomlinson's observations. Galli is often offensive in his attitude toward those of us fed up with the easy answers and cosy compromises of his brand of faith: at one point he argues that people leave conservative evangelical churches not because of the rampant anti-intellectualism or the cultural irrelevance, but rather because they want to avoid discipline and tithing. In another marginal comment he claims that since conservative churches in the US are growing they are obviously on the right track. In the sense that megachurches are providing a product that many consumers seem to enjoy, he is right. Many of us would like to believe that their is something more to Christianity than that.

I assume that Zondervan added the commentary in order to protect its reputation in the evengelical/fundamentalist community. It is possible to read the book without reading the margins, but if you are a footnote/endnote reader like me you will find yourself drwn to the commentaries; and if you are passionate about finding a more meaningful faith than what you can find in the American megachurch some of those commentaries will drive you crazy. Get the book in any case, but get the British edition if you can find it.

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