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by Robert E. Webber

  • ISBN: 0830834818
  • Category: Christian Books
  • Author: Robert E. Webber
  • Subcategory: Christian Living
  • Other formats: lrf mbr docx rtf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: IVP Books (May 24, 2008)
  • Pages: 137 pages
  • FB2 size: 1669 kb
  • EPUB size: 1591 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 564
Download Who Gets to Narrate the World?: Contending for the Christian Story in an Age of Rivals fb2

Robert Webber's final gift to the Christian community. This is truly a sobering book by Robert Webber, written at the very end of his life, with all his keen insight into history and theology.

Robert Webber's final gift to the Christian community. I would certainly recommend this book to beginning theology readers interested in understanding the relationship of the Christian faith and culture formation. Daniel J. Doleys, Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth (rdwot. com), February 20, 2009). Webber's critique will resonate with many. Webber died from pancreatic cancer shortly after he finished the book and before it was published.

Here is where Robert E. Webber’s book, Who Gets to Narrate the World, is important, in which the author discusses . This work is one that Europe should seriously read and consider. Webber’s book, Who Gets to Narrate the World, is important, in which the author discusses the issue of contending for the Christian story in an age of rivals.

144 pages, softcover from InterVarsity. If you read this book carefully you will hear the Christian store in new ways and be better prepared to resist the idolatries of modernity and postmodernity that Webber condemns. an excellent survey of worldviews. Who Gets to Narrate the World?: Contending for the Christian Story in an Age of Rivals (9780830834815) by Robert E. Webber. A thought-provoking read, a call to vie for the biblical Christian narrative in your actions. Thank you Robert Webber. This was Bob Webber's last book; it puts together all of his thinking.

Contending for the Christian Story in an Age of Rivals. This is the burden of Webber's final book, Who Gets to Narrate the World? Contending for the Christian Story in an Age of Rivals. Select Format: Paperback.

This is the burden of Webber's final book, Who Gets to Narrate the World?

Christianity in America, he preached, will not survive if Christians are not rooted in and informed by the uniquely Christian story that is the gospel of Jesus Christ. This is the burden of Webber's final book, Who Gets to Narrate the World?: Contending for the Christian Story in an Age of Rivals. Convinced that American evangelicals are facing the demise of their entire way of life and faith, Webber challenges his readers to rise up and engage both the external and internal challenges confronting them today.

Who Gets to Narrate the World?: Contending for the Christian Story in an Age of Rivals (2008).

The series draws on several thousand texts and publications and covers topics like Old and New Testament worship and contemporary applications for music and the arts. Webber founded The Robert E. Webber Institute for Worship Studies in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1998. Who Gets to Narrate the World?: Contending for the Christian Story in an Age of Rivals (2008). Some of Webber's books were republished under different titles.

On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Who gets to narrate the world? : contending for the Christian story in an age of rivals, Robert E.

The late Robert Webber provided us with many books that have influenced ministry in our own ag. He challenges us to reclaim our own story as we confront the twin threats of Radical Islam and Western narcissism.

The late Robert Webber provided us with many books that have influenced ministry in our own age. In his final volume, Who Gets to Narrate the World? Contending for the Christian Story in an Age of Rivals (IVP), Webber argues that the Christian faith in our day has been weakened by its accommodation to culture and explains that, One of the reasons why the church has fallen prey to a cultural accommodation is that it has become disconnected from its roots in Scripture, in the ancient church an.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Contending for the Christian Story in an Age of Rivals. Christians may find themselves asking how early believers worshiped and whether they can provide insight into how we should praise God today. Rooted in historical models and patristic church studies, Ancient-Future Worship examines how early Christian worship models can be applied to the postmodern church.

Who gets to narrate the world? The late Robert Webber believed this question to be the most pressing issue of our time. Christianity in America, he preached, will not survive if Christians are not rooted in and informed by the uniquely Christian story that is the gospel of Jesus Christ. This is the burden of Webber's final book, Who Gets to Narrate the World?: Contending for the Christian Story in an Age of Rivals. Convinced that American evangelicals are facing the demise of their entire way of life and faith, Webber challenges his readers to rise up and engage both the external and internal challenges confronting them today. This means that Christians must repent of their cultural accommodation and reclaim the unique story--the Christian story--that God has given them both to proclaim and to live.
Reviews about Who Gets to Narrate the World?: Contending for the Christian Story in an Age of Rivals (7):
Bladecliff
This is Bob Webber's last book. While he was writing, he was aware that he was dying of pancreatic cancer. So, he wanted to leave us something that we could "chew on." He did. He is concerned that the Christian world view has been lost in recent generations. He explains how it happened and what are the two forces that are vying for the right to take the Christian world view's place. These two forces he identifies as 1) radical Islam, and 2) secular humanism (or, in the Christian community, you could label it commercialism). He asserts that, in a competition, radical Islam will eventually win over secular humanism (as, he asserts, it is already happening in Europe). He is holding out for the Christian world view, but he sees the church reverting to an "ancient future" mission to accomplish this. The book ends with "A Call to Narrate the World Christianly." In some ways, Bob's second-last book, "Ancient Future Worship," brings us more depth and background on what he is advocating in this book. Bob was my mentor in Grad School. Several of us miss him greatly. We're hoping in our ministries to set as priorities what Bob suggests here, where he summarized what he taught us.
Gavinrage
This is truly a sobering book by Robert Webber, written at the very end of his life, with all his keen insight into history and theology. Webber died from pancreatic cancer shortly after he finished the book and before it was published. Otherwise, he would no doubt be a target for radical Islamic extremists, as he speaks the truth about this very real threat to a Christian world view. The other threat he identifies is cultural accommodation, comparing modern America with the Roman Empire, which fell from within due to it's moral decadence, philosophical relativism and religious pluralism. Webber's call to relearn the Christian narrative and break away from our accommodation to culture is something Christians need to hear and embrace.
Kagda
Read this book for my Theology and Worldview Class for my Masters. Very great material, but focused a bit too much on Islam. The other has an obvious bias against Islam far above all other worldviews. If you want to know more about modern/postmodern worldviews, I would recommend this book. I also recommend this book if you want to know some more theological points of view for apologetics in the worldview of Islam.
Tcaruieb
It is ironical when people say they have no religion, and that religions should be banned from the public domain. Because there is no neutral ground. We all seek to make sense of the world as we see it. That is the peculiar fate of the human being. Even the newborn is a centre of awareness trying to process the environment into which it has plummeted. Each of us develops an internal narrative which outruns, and always will outrun, the evidence available to finally clinch its claim to truth - at least this side of death. And each of us is to some extent influenced, in the evolution of our own story, by the stories of others. This is particularly so in regard to the big picture stories generated by the major religions, and by philosophers who pour scorn on them. Since all persons embrace by faith certain ultimate bets on what is the ultimate nature of the reality they inhabit, we are correctly described as "homo religiosus", even those who deny the ascription, such as scientific humanists.

It is therefore entirely in order to ask, as Robert E. Webber does, "Who gets to narrate the world?' In this relatively small book, Webber packs a closely reasoned argument that societies tend to be dominated by particular big picture stories. He deftly leads us through the narratives, or world-view accounts, of early Christianity and the pre-Christian European era. He then goes on to show how the Judaic and Christian stories became dominant in the West. Then he tracks "how the West lost God's narrative", yielding to a dominant Modernism which rode in on the back of scientific discovery. This in turn has been contested by trends he describes as Postmodern, post-Christian, and Neopagan, with additional contenders challenging these as well, notably Radical Islam. The final substantive chapter sounds "A Call to an Ancient Evangelical future" aimed at helping Christians to regain the ideological initiative through a return to the robust story of God's decisive action, as set down in the early centuries of the church's development.

Webber writes as a thinking Evangelical Christian, though he is quite prepared to deplore the comfortable, privatised narrative which often disfigures the Evangelical tradition, particularly in affluent, middle-class America. His analyses of the various stories are clear and pithy, providing a readable summary which would be ideal as a backdrop for a series of seminars in a church or seminary, using this book as primary background reading. It would be a fine conversation starter in wider circles too. For me, it has drawn together many threads of cultural and theological analysis that have been exercising my own mind, and I commend it to anyone seeking to chart a course for Christian thought and action through the tangle of stories competing for dominance in the modern world.
zzzachibis
Fast and the book arrived the way it was described.
Dynen
This is a book everyone should read
Mozel
Webber nails the issues of the current weakness in evangelical Christianity in relation to the internal and external threats faced in postmodern Christianity. Well worth the time to read and pray over.
Very insightful treaty of the influential forces within our world today that are effecting what we see and hear.

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