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by Ben Witherington III

  • ISBN: 1602580049
  • Category: Christian Books
  • Author: Ben Witherington III
  • Subcategory: Catholicism
  • Other formats: azw lrf rtf mbr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Baylor University Press (April 1, 2007)
  • Pages: 135 pages
  • FB2 size: 1247 kb
  • EPUB size: 1947 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 638
Download Troubled Waters: Rethinking the Theology of Baptism fb2

Troubled Waters - Rethinking the Theology of Baptism. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press. Witherington III 2012b. It is one of the most basic tenants of Wesleyan Arminian theology that salvation is not complete at the new birth (or justification).

Troubled Waters - Rethinking the Theology of Baptism. The Problem with Evangelical Theology: Testing the Exegetical Foundations of Calvinism, Dispensationalism, and Wesleyanism. The Wesleyan Arminian stresses that in fact there are three tenses to salvation for the believer-"I have been saved (the new birth), I am being saved (sanctification), and I shall be saved to the uttermost (glorification).

Troubled Waters book. Start by marking Troubled Waters: Rethinking the Theology of Baptism as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Witherington III, Ben (1988). Women in the Earliest Churches. Troubled Waters - Rethinking the Theology of Baptism. a b Witherington III, Ben (April 2012). When a Daughter Dies: Walking the Way of Grace in the Midst of Grief". Society for New Testament Studies, Monograph Series. Baylor University Press. ^ a b Witherington III, Ben (April 2012).

In this volume, Ben Witherington rethinks the theology of baptism and does so in constant conversation with the . Ben Witherington III is Professor of New Testament for Doctoral Studies, Asbury Theological Seminary.

In this volume, Ben Witherington rethinks the theology of baptism and does so in constant conversation with the classic theological positions and central New Testament texts. By placing baptism in the context of the covenant, Witherington shows how advocates of both believer's baptism and infant baptism have added some water to both their theology and practice of baptism. Pages: 135 Publisher: Baylor University Press Published: 2007 ISBN-10: 1602580049 ISBN-13: 9781602580046. Find at a Library Find at Google Books.

I was watching the PBS special the other night in which Paul Simon was honored for a career of great song writing with the very first Gershwin Award of the Library of Congress- certainly a well deserved tribute. Of course one of his most famous songs, actually sung mainly by his partner Art Garfunkel, was "Bridge over Troubled Waters".

In this volume, Ben Witherington rethinks the theology of baptism and does so in. .Title: Troubled Waters: The Real New Testament Theology of Baptism. Ben Witherington III (PhD, Durham University) is Amos Professor for Doctoral Studies, Asbury Theological Seminary, Wilmore, Kentucky, and is on the doctoral faculty at St. Andrews University, Scotland. Author: Ben Witherington III. Publisher: Baylor University Press. Print Publication Date: 2007.

Other titles include Troubled Waters: Rethinking the Theology of Baptism and The Living Word of God: Rethinking the .

Other titles include Troubled Waters: Rethinking the Theology of Baptism and The Living Word of God: Rethinking the Theology of the Bible. Bible scholar Ben Witherington is Amos Professor of New Testament for Doctoral Studies at Asbury Theological Seminary and on the doctoral faculty at St. Andrews University in Scotland. And Dr. Witherington has done us all a favor in writing a book in which he attempts to get beyond the rhetoric and debate, taking a fresh look at the biblical texts, the early Christian writings, and the theological developments up to the present age.

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Baptism has been a contested practice from the very beginning of the church. In this volume, Ben Witherington rethinks the theology of baptism and does so in constant conversation with the classic theological positions and central New Testament texts. By placing baptism in the context of the covenant, Witherington shows how advocates of both believer's baptism and infant baptism have added some water to both their theology and practice of baptism
Reviews about Troubled Waters: Rethinking the Theology of Baptism (7):
Daigami
Witherington is certainly a prolific author and exegete. This reviewer has enjoyed some of that production. But here, I must say, he gets himself into hot water. A statement he makes towards the end of the book confesses a great deal about where he is coming from on this doctrine and my conclusions on this book: "A person's theology of baptism is to one degree or another a function of a person's soteriology--one's theology of salvation."

I think this is so true and telling. Witherington goes on to say that he thinks salvation comes in stages, and of course, as Reformed theologian he always intersperses symbolism into everything. To be sure then, a Reformed and Lutheran would not see eye to eye on soteriology matters, as a Lutheran such as I would never say that salvation comes in stages. Nor would I call God's mandated means of grace symbols. Neither would I speak the language here that is so foreign to quite a wide cut of Christian theology as to set up a false division into a water baptism and Spirit baptism. Thus, this book does not advance this gulf much at all in this humble reviewers opinion.

Witherington expresses much confidence in citing 1 Cor. 12:13 as evidence for this division into two baptisms, Water and Spirit. He speaks of this passage: "Immediately apparent is that the language is highly metaphorical. One does not literally drink in the Holy Spirit." A Lutheran commentator on this same passage argues convincingly that the original here is more of the nature of "watered by the Holy Spirit," as another usage in 1 Cor. 3:8 shows us. So Witherington shows his a priori bias here. Interested parties can check out Lockwood's fine commentary on 1 Corinthians published by CPH.

A major issue with this work is infant baptism, so much ink is devoted to this issue. Rather than critique this and provide Biblical and historical evidence against, would refer those who want a clear refutation of such, I would point them to David Scaer's excellent volume on "Baptism" in the Confessional Lutheran Dogmatics Series, Volume X1. Especially the opening chapters which set the stage for baptism of all sinners, including infants, and Biblical mandate for such as well as the excellent Chapter 7 on "Baptism and the Holy Spirit."
Auridora
I have been doing a lot of research on baptism. My path has lead me to all sorts of writers. This writer was of great interest because he is a professor at Asbury Seminary. Methodists seem to run from baptism. While there might be some worth while material in it, you will work to find it. It seems like he can not make up his mind on infant baptism and a few other points. In the end he finally gets it right, but you have to root deep other wise. Because of his approach, and that he was frustrating at times to follow, I take two stars. Other then that, his conclusion, when he gets there, seems right.
Fararala
Witherington's small book on baptism debates is a welcome edition to the discussion. I do agree with G.E. Davis (below) that Witherington's position is hard to figure out; but in one sense I say, "who cares?" That is because the chapters, and exegetical and theological insights therein, do a fine job at conveying helpful information regarding certain issues surrounding "the baptism debate."

Witherington discusses such topics as: paedo/credo baptism (and a lot of what is involved in that debate, viz., household passages, I Cor. 7, Acts 2, etc); water baptism's relation with spirit baptism, John's baptism; the Great Commission; the missionary setting of baptism, etc.

Witherington disagrees (and agrees!) with *both* paedo scholars and credo scholars on varying issues. For example, he disagrees with a popular credobaptist approach to 1 Cor. 7 - P.K. Jewett's take on that verse. He argues that the Great Commission is not a decisive verse on the proper subjects of baptism. He disagrees with many paedobaptists who might separate Spirit baptism and water baptism; but(!), he leaves room for this view in some instances (hence the confounded reviewer below), showing somewhat decisively that there is no necessary connection, i.e., the two could and were distinguished (contrary to some credo scholars, e.g., Tom Schreiner).

Overall the book was a good read. It is a short read so you could finish it in a sitting or two. There are also some helpful insights, for both paedo and credo baptist. The book could have delved further into some areas, handling some tougher responses (from both sides), and so that's why I gave it 4 stars. I would recommend this as a helpful addition to your "sacramental" section of your library.

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