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by Martin Buber

  • ISBN: 0020842201
  • Category: Christian Books
  • Author: Martin Buber
  • Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference
  • Other formats: txt azw mbr rtf
  • Language: English Hebrew
  • Publisher: Collier Books (November 1, 1985)
  • Pages: 246 pages
  • FB2 size: 1517 kb
  • EPUB size: 1624 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 395
Download The Prophetic Faith (English and Hebrew Edition) fb2

by. Buber, Martin, 1878-1965.

by. Translation of: Torat ha-neviʼim.

The Prophetic Faith book. Originally published in English in 1949, "The Prophetic Faith" features Martin Buber's readings of select biblical prophets-especially Isaiah and Deborah, the only female prophet and judge in the Hebrew Bible.

Originally published in English in 1949, The Prophetic Faith features Martin Buber's readings of select biblical prophets-especially Isaiah and Deborah, the only female prophet and judge in the Hebrew Bible

Originally published in English in 1949, The Prophetic Faith features Martin Buber's readings of select biblical prophets-especially Isaiah and Deborah, the only female prophet and judge in the Hebrew Bible. In an approach that combines insights from biblical prophecy with a concern for events in the here and now, Buber outlines his interpretation of biblical revelation.

Originally published in English in 1949, The Prophetic Faith features Martin Buber's readings of select biblical prophets - especially Isaiah and Deborah, the only female prophet and judge in the Hebrew Bible

Originally published in English in 1949, The Prophetic Faith features Martin Buber's readings of select biblical prophets - especially Isaiah and Deborah, the only female prophet and judge in the Hebrew Bible. In an approach that combines insights from biblical prophecy with a concern for events in the here and now, Buber outlines his interpretation of biblical revelation

Excerpt from The Prophetic Faith With regard to the use of Scriptural passages .

Excerpt from The Prophetic Faith With regard to the use of Scriptural passages in the first and the second part we must make certain methodological observa tions. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Martin Buber (1878-1965) is perhaps most widely known (at least in English) for the Philosophy of Dialogue, and for his re-tellings of Eastern-European Jewish traditions ("Tales of the Hasidim," "Tales of Rabbi Nachman," "Tales of the Baal Shem"). Somewhere between the two fits "The Prophetic Faith," translated from Hebrew by Carlyle Witton-Davies (Macmillan, New York, 1949).

Title: Prophetic faith Author: Martin Buber. This is an exact replica of a book published in 1949. The book reprint was manually improved by a team of professionals, as opposed to automatic/OCR processes used by some companies. The task of this book is to describe a teaching which reached its completion in some of the writing prophets from the last decades of the Northern kingdom to the return from the Babylonian exile. and to describe it both as regards its historical process and as regards its antecedents. This is the teaching about the relation between the God of Israel and Israel. It did not begin with the first writing prophets.

Buber had written dozens of books about Jewish history, theology, mysticism, and scripture. Buber was a contested figure, Paul Mendes-Flohr writes in his new biography, Martin Buber: A Life of Faith and Dissent (Yale). He was an early adherent of Zionism, worked on translating the Hebrew Bible into German, and popularized Hasidic folklore; during the Nazi period, he ran a Jewish adult-education program in Germany, to sustain the morale of his persecuted people. He evoked passionate, often conflicting opinions about his person and thought. There were always readers who distrusted Buber’s thinking about Judaism, which was defiantly innovative and anti-traditional.

Martin Buber vaulted into prominence in German intellectual life in the first years of the 20th century, when he was still in. .Martin Buber: A Life of Faith and Dissent is perhaps less a biography than an intellectual history of Buber, although the essential facts of his life are duly reported.

Martin Buber vaulted into prominence in German intellectual life in the first years of the 20th century, when he was still in his early 20s. His fame and influence spread across Western Europe in the decades that followed, as well as to Palestine, where he was compelled to flee at the late date of 1938. Although his presence in the United States has somewhat diminished, during the years after World War II he was repeatedly a center of attention here.

When Buber died in 1965 his life and work were hailed in the press of the Western world as worthy of the description ‘prophetic’. The reluctance of many of his Jewish contemporaries to join the chorus of praise gave an authentic note to such a description, for the office of prophet has always been conceded to be unpopular. For political reasons Buber was, and still is, often ‘without honour’ in Israel: his federalist ideals, comprising Jews and Arabs, could hardly commend themselves to an army under siege.

1949, The Prophetic Faith features Martin Bubers readings of select biblical prophetsespecially Isaiah and Deborah, the only female prophet and judge in the Hebrew Bible. As he writes in the prelude to this volume, Real listening has become rare. Bubers words could not be more prophetic. Leora Batnitzky, Princeton University.

Examines the relationship between the Jews and God through study of the Old Testament and traces the development of religious ideas
Reviews about The Prophetic Faith (English and Hebrew Edition) (2):
Conjulhala
Martin Buber (1878-1965) is perhaps most widely known (at least in English) for the Philosophy of Dialogue, and for his re-tellings of Eastern-European Jewish traditions ("Tales of the Hasidim," "Tales of Rabbi Nachman," "Tales of the Baal Shem"). These last (plus some shorter works) present a charming picture of the "Pietist" Hasidic movement in Eastern Europe in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and are a major literary accomplishment, but they have been criticized for projecting too much of Buber's own belief in religious spontaneity onto the generally tradition-minded religious leaders he depicts. It is also clear that Buber glossed over the basis of much Hasidic doctrine in the mystical teachings of an earlier social elite.

Among his philosophical writings, the best known, or at least most heard-of, is the short book *Ich und Du,* which has twice been translated into English as "I and Thou."

Among his lesser-known literary projects is a German rendering of the Chinese classic "Chuang-tzu," based on existing translations; an English translation of it was published, probably inevitably, as "I and Tao."

To readers of German, he is also the translator (originally in collaboration with Franz Rosenzweig) of the Hebrew Bible ("Old Testament") in a style intended to reflect the underlying Hebrew as closely as possible. (It was originally intended for the German-speaking Jews of Central Europe.)

He was also a self-professed Utopian Socialist -- anathema to the Marxist true-believer -- ("Paths in Utopia"), and an historical novelist ("For the Sake of Heaven" -- published in German as "Gog und Magog"), and a comparative theologian ("Two Types of Faith: A Study of the Interpenetration of Judaism and Christianity" and "Good and Evil: Two Interpretations").

He spent the latter part of his life trying to promote peace between Israel and the Arabs.

He wrote primarily in German (see the long list of his original writings in the Wikipedia article devoted to him), and some of his books were notable for their difficult style and language -- at one time it was joked that he must find writing in Hebrew difficult, because he didn't know it well enough to be really obscure. In those instances he presents a problem for translators.

Along the way, he wrote several volumes of Biblical interpretation, including a collection of essays. Probably the most accessible of them is "Moses" (also published as "Moses: The Revelation and the Covenant"), which I reviewed a good many years ago. To my mind, the most successful, but the most difficult, is "The Kingship of God." Somewhere between the two fits "The Prophetic Faith," translated from Hebrew by Carlyle Witton-Davies (Macmillan, New York, 1949). There have been several reprintings over the years: I am working from the Harper TORCHBOOKS / The Cloister Library paperback edition (Harper & Row, 1961).

The arrangement of the book is not immediately recognizable as chronological; Buber accepts some of the Higher Critical theories about the relative dates of some Biblical literature, He starts with the "Song of Deborah" from the Book of Judges, widely considered an archaic composition. He then backtracks to episodes from "Joshua" and "Exodus," before turning to "Genesis" in a chapter on "The God of the Fathers." It is only then that he turns to books of "Samuel," "Kings," "Chronicles," and the "writing Prophets," treating selected events and passages in roughly chronological order.

Some of Buber's readings are acute, and largely convincing, such as the concluding sections on the image of the "Suffering Servant" in the later chapters of "Isaiah," passages that are central to the Christian reading of the book (as speaking of Jesus), and comparatively peripheral to Jewish thought (interpretation of the verses often being atomistic).

Other discussions are notably weaker. "The God of the Fathers" gives a rather idealized, and romantic, view of the pastoral world of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, where more recent scholarship would look closely at the gritty realities of Western Asia in the Bronze Age. More importantly, Buber uses "Genesis" to ground his personal religious style, spiritually aware, but without the enormous apparatus of law, customs, and liturgy characteristic of traditional Judaism (indeed, central to virtually all well-attested forms of Judaism up to modern times). In fact, his version of the Patriarchs has more than a little resemblance to his version of the Hasidic leaders....
Welen
As a born and raised Christian I was taught that the songs of the Servant of YHVH in Isaiah were all about Jesus, but for many years I have believed that this servant is a composite figure. Buber explains that this is well known in Judaism and goes into it in detail, including his own inspired take on it.

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