» » Memory and Manuscript with Tradition and Transmission in Early Christianity (Biblical Resource Series)

Download Memory and Manuscript with Tradition and Transmission in Early Christianity (Biblical Resource Series) fb2

by Mr. Birger Gerhardsson,Mr. Eric J. Sharpe,Mr. Jacob Neusner

  • ISBN: 0802843662
  • Category: Christian Books
  • Author: Mr. Birger Gerhardsson,Mr. Eric J. Sharpe,Mr. Jacob Neusner
  • Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference
  • Other formats: lit lrf mbr azw
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.; Revised edition (May 1, 1998)
  • FB2 size: 1802 kb
  • EPUB size: 1268 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 312
Download Memory and Manuscript with Tradition and Transmission in Early Christianity (Biblical Resource Series) fb2

In Memory and Manuscript (1961), Gerhardsson explores the way in which Jewish rabbis during the first Christian centuries . For those interested in an understanding of the development of biblical manuscripts this book is a plus.

In Memory and Manuscript (1961), Gerhardsson explores the way in which Jewish rabbis during the first Christian centuries preserved and passed on their sacred tradition, and he shows how early Christianity is better understood in light of how that tradition developed in Rabbinic Judaism. In Tradition and Transmission in Early Christianity (1964), Gerhardsson further clarifies the discussion and answers criticism of his earlier book. It is written on a high scale and presents information that many are not aware of.

In Tradition and Transmission in Early Christianity (1964), Gerhardsson further clarifies the discussion and answers criticism of his earlier book

In Tradition and Transmission in Early Christianity (1964), Gerhardsson further clarifies the discussion and answers criticism of his earlier book.

Birger Gerhardsson (1926 – 25 December 2013) was a Swedish biblical scholar and professor . Biblical Resource Series.

Birger Gerhardsson (1926 – 25 December 2013) was a Swedish biblical scholar and professor emeritus in the Faculty of Theology at Lund University, Sweden Contents. Memory and Manuscript: Oral Tradition and Written Transmission in Rabbinic Judaism and Early Christianity (P. The Origins of the Gospel Traditions.

This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Memory and Manuscript: Oral Tradition and Written Transmission in Rabbinic Judaism and Early Christianity; With, Tradition and Transmission I Explores the way in which Jewish rabbis during the first Christian centuries preserved and passed on their sacred tradition, and he shows how early Christianity is better understood in light of how that tradition developed in Rabbinic Judaism. William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company.

Biblical Form Criticism in Its Context. Memory and manuscript: oral tradition and written transmission in rabbinic Judaism and early Christianity; with, Tradition and transmission in early Christianity. Early jewish visions of hell.

As a tradition, Christianity is more than a system of religious belief. Given such complexity, it is natural that throughout Christian history both those in the tradition and those surrounding it have made attempts at simplification. It also has generated a culture, a set of ideas and ways of life, practices, and artifacts that have been handed down from generation to generation since Jesus first became the object of faith. Christianity is thus both a living tradition of faith and the culture that the faith leaves behind. The agent of Christianity is the church, the community of people who make up the body of believers.

Gerhardsson, Birger (Memory and Manuscript; Oral Traditions and Written Transmission in Rabbinic Judaism and Early Christianity ) deals primarily with halachic transmission

Gerhardsson, Birger (Memory and Manuscript; Oral Traditions and Written Transmission in Rabbinic Judaism and Early Christianity ) deals primarily with halachic transmission. When he deals with aggada (145–48) he qualifies his work with the admission, If we overlook the somewhat freer treatment which the haggadic material receives in principle. It is my contention that consideration of the somewhat freer treatment is essential in understanding the transmission of aggada. See Finkelstein, Louis, The Transmission of Early Rabbinic Tradition, HUCA 16 (1941) 115–35.

Memory And Manuscript With Tradition And Transmission In Early Christianity Biblical Resource FREE memory and manuscript with tradition and transmission in early christianity biblical resource Memory and Manuscript with Tradition and Transmission in Early.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Explores the way in which Jewish rabbis during the first Christian centuries preserved and passed on their sacred tradition.

The parochial history of Cornwall, founded on the manuscript histories of Mr. Hals and Mr. Tonkin; with additions and various appendices. The parochial history of Cornwall, founded on the manuscript histories of Mr. by. Gilbert, Davies, 1767-1839.

Ehrman rejects Gerhardsson’s work under the claim that modern scholars have noted several major problems with it (68). Ehrman is correct that Gerhardsson was critiqued extensively, yet he fails to note that his biggest critic, renowned rabbinic scholar Jacob Neusner, actually changed his views on Gerhardsson’s work.

Explores the way in which Jewish rabbis during the first Christian centuries preserved and passed on their sacred tradition, and he shows how early Christianity is better understood in light of how that tradition develoed in Rabbinic Judaism.
Reviews about Memory and Manuscript with Tradition and Transmission in Early Christianity (Biblical Resource Series) (4):
Yannara
This book by Gerhardsson is interesting concerning the time from the oral delivery of the Gospel message being written. For those interested in an understanding of the development of biblical manuscripts this book is a plus. It is written on a high scale and presents information that many are not aware of. This book is what I call class room material - so when you purchase this book be ready for a learning experience. It will challenge you and you will know that after reading and study you will be a better student for doing so. I recommend this book.
Xangeo
To think that this book was mostly ignored - at least when it was first published as Gerhardsson's doctoral thesis in 1961.

Yet today it may be one of the most quoted books by other biblical scholars. And no wonder. Gerhardsson struck a mortal blow to Bultmann and the form critics and their emphasis on literary form and the written word.

Most Second Temple Jews believed their oral tradition - the oral Torah - to be the equal of scripture, and as binding. Both Philo and Josephus attest to this belief.

To ensure that the truths they believed in were taught to children, Jews developed a school system. "Simeon ben Shetah...arranged for children to attend a bet sefer" (p 58)...toward the end of the Amoraic period, school attendance was, to judge from the evidence, quite general, although not compulsory, among the Jews" (p 59). It appears the sole subject taught was the "reading of the sacred Scriptures" (p 61). The bet sefer were primary schools and "are known to scholars as mishnah schools" (p 91).

Even so, theirs was more an oral than a written culture. And all the ancient schools apparently taught by rote, by unending memorization. Boys in Athens memorized vast portions of Homer. In Judaea, the lowest educational level for the youngest boys emphasized this sort of memorization. Various mnemonic techniques were utilized.

It was common for students to take notes "intended to facilitate learning and continued memorization; practice and future repetition" (p 161). These notebooks served as reminders. (Some scholars today argue that the reason the Christians began to use the codex form was because it resembled these notebooks.)

People read aloud. Across all of the ancient world, with only a few exceptions hear about, all books were read aloud. As another aid to memory, "In ancient Judaism the sacred texts were recited with cantillation" (p 166). Teachers were also supposed to be examples, morally and in their everyday life, as they lived out the dictates of the oral and written scriptures.

Feats of memory which we, steeped in our written culture, can scarcely imagine, were achieved in ancient times. Some students truly excelled at memorization, and could recite whole books. The "tannaim was developed in Amoraic times...they seem to have been counted as being a form of official, connected with the college for the purpose of maintaining the necessary oral texts...They were purely and simply living books" (p 99).

Gerhardsson points out that "The book of Sirach gives us an interesting picture of...a 'school' in which the Torah, the Covenant, and the Temple with its priests are respected...but where the pupils are at the same time exhorted to go to other lands in order to share their wisdom" (p 88). Rabbinic colleges were also founded.

The early Christians believed in the traditions they had been taught. Paul insists, time and again, he is only passing on traditions he learned. "Paul says clearly...that he has already transmitted the basic authoritative tradition to his congregations, over and over we hear him appeal to what his listeners have already heard...or received" (p 291).

Therefore we we that "the church in Thessalonia has become an imitator of the...the mother churches in Judaea" (p 293) taught by those in authority, apostles, and later, bishops. Irenaeus "claims to have learned the tradition by heart" (p 205).

Paul states that "the word of God proceeds from Jerusalem, and treats the leaders of the Jerusalem congregation...Apostles...as the supreme (human doctrinal authority of the Church " (p 296). Gerhardsson points out that 1 Cor. 15.3 that Paul took his tradition "from the college of Apostles in Jerusalem" (p 300).

Significantly, "The main view of the Apostles which we find in Acts is that they are Christ's witnesses" (p 221).
Nayatol
Academia is ruled by fads. This handsomely presented republication (with new material) of one of the most important and least known books relating to the history of early Judaism and of very early Christianity was savagely attacked by one of the leading Biblical scholars of the 1950's and 1960's and a group of his associates and students. One of those students--the prolific Jewish scholar Jacob Neusner--now repents from his unfair attack and adds his own lengthy preface to a book he, in effect, helped to suppress three decades ago. The Scandinavian author, Birger Gerharddson, offered a detailed and very scholarly argument in favor of the "stability" of the process by which trained scribes and religious teachers in the first century C.E. were concerned with the accurate preservation and transmission of important religious traditions in both early rabbinic Judaism and, by analogy, in early Christianity. Since it is a foundational belief of much of contemporary "New Testament scholarship" that the canonical gospels are NOT the product of a conscious process of careful preservation and transmission, this book and its author have been largely ignored for a third of a century. Ignored, but not refuted. This is a densely argued book, drawing heavily on early Mishnaic sources (quoted in the Hebrew), and is not for casual students. For serious students of the origins of the gospels and for those exploring the historical background to the development of early Christianity, this is one of the most important studies to have been written in the past half century.
Hinewen
I wholeheartedly agree with my fellow reviewer Cato and his praise for this book. I only wanted to add that it's my opinion that the importance of this book will not be fully realized for many years, as this study - along with the work being done re ancient Hebraic literary structures (especially as it pertains to meaning) - will combine to unlock the secrets of the earliest Christianity. Birger's incredible work is a must for those who are interested in seminal Christianity. I recommend this book without reservation.

Related to Memory and Manuscript with Tradition and Transmission in Early Christianity (Biblical Resource Series) fb2 books: