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by Yoram Hazony

  • ISBN: 0521176670
  • Category: Christian Books
  • Author: Yoram Hazony
  • Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference
  • Other formats: doc lrf rtf docx
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (July 30, 2012)
  • Pages: 394 pages
  • FB2 size: 1770 kb
  • EPUB size: 1495 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 443
Download The Philosophy of Hebrew Scripture fb2

Yoram, why did you write The Philosophy of Hebrew Scripture? Hebrew Scripture is an intensely personal .

Yoram, why did you write The Philosophy of Hebrew Scripture? Hebrew Scripture is an intensely personal subject for me. In some ways, I feel a very deep sympathy for biblical figures like Jeremiah and Ezekiel. These are people who saw the destruction of their nation with their own eyes-something that we can hardly even imagine. Hazony focuses this exposition on the contribution of the Hebrew Bible to the exploration and understanding of philosophy and natural law. He typically starts each argument by refuting particular stereotypes about the Hebrew Bible that obstruct its study as a work of philosophy.

Though Hazony’s book benefits from his extensive and rigorous work in political theory, he does not posi- tion this volume within the history of the encounter between Hebrew scripture and Greek philosophy. This absence constitutes a significant loss for the book, in my estimation. Sustained engagement with this history would have not only positioned his work within this rich and well-regarded tradition but also enabled the nonexpert to discern the unique contribution he makes to the history of this discourse.

But, Hazony is not merely arguing that Yoram Hazony's The Philosophy of Hebrew Scripture offers a fascinating and .

But, Hazony is not merely arguing that Yoram Hazony's The Philosophy of Hebrew Scripture offers a fascinating and refreshing approach to the Hebrew Bible. Hazony argues that Hebrew scripture is frequently mischaracterized and misread due to the fact that it is too often received as simply a work of revelation rather than a work of reason. One of the main purposes of this book is to make the case for the Hebrew Scriptures as a work of philosophy, although it's not entirely clear what that's supposed to mean (or even if Hazony is clear on it).

Eleonore Stump is Professor of Philosophy at St. Louis University and author of ‘Aquinas’

Yoram Hazony, NY Times "The Stone". Eleonore Stump is Professor of Philosophy at St. Louis University and author of ‘Aquinas’. She is past president of the Society of Christian Philosophers.

The Philosophy of Hebrew Scripture PHILOSOPHY, JEWISH - This article is arranged according to the following outline: WHAT IS JEWISH PHILOSOPHY? recent histories of jewish philosophy.

The Philosophy of Hebrew Scripture. PHILOSOPHY, JEWISH - This article is arranged according to the following outline: WHAT IS JEWISH PHILOSOPHY? recent histories of jewish philosophy biblical and rabbinic antecedents bible rabbinic literature hellenistic jewish philosophy philo of alexandria biblica. Encyclopedia of Judaism.

Yoram Hazony is an Israeli philosopher, Bible scholar and political theorist ^ "Yoram Hazony - The Philosophy of Hebrew Scripture". Dietze, Jane (5 October 1984).

Yoram Hazony is an Israeli philosopher, Bible scholar and political theorist. He is President of the Herzl Institute in Jerusalem, and serves as the Chairman of the Edmund Burke Foundation. Hazony's book The Virtue of Nationalism (Basic Books, 2018) was selected as the Conservative Book of the Year for 2019. His Philosophy of Hebrew Scripture (Cambridge, 2012) received the second-place PROSE Award for best book in Theology and Religion from the American Association of Publishers. "Yoram Hazony - The Philosophy of Hebrew Scripture". New campus conservative journal strives for intellectual approach".

Yoram Hazony is Provost of the Shalem Center in Jerusalem and a Senior Fellow in the Department of Philosophy, Political Theory and Religion (PPR). Hazony's previous books include The Jewish State: The Struggle for Israel's Soul and The Dawn: Political Teachings of the Book of Esther. He is author of a regular blog on philosophy, Judaism, Israel and higher education called Jerusalem Letters.

Yoram Hazony, an Israeli political philosopher and founder of the Shalem Center, wants to. .

Yoram Hazony, an Israeli political philosopher and founder of the Shalem Center, wants to create a paradigm shift in how we view and understand the Bible. Never one to shy away from ambitious goals, Hazony gives us his newest work, The Philosophy of Hebrew Scripture: An Introduction, a book that attempts to undo generations of misguided thinking as to the general nature and purpose of the Bible. Essentially, Hazony contends that we think of ancient books in two crude ways: either as books of philosophy or books of revelation.

This book offers a new perspective on how the Bible is truly meant to be read.

Select Format: Hardcover. This book offers a new perspective on how the Bible is truly meant to be read. ISBN13: 9780521176675. Release Date: July 2012.

Publisher: Cambridge University Press. It is free of disciplinary jargon. You are leaving VitalSource and being redirected to The Philosophy of Hebrew Scripture. eTextbook Return Policy. Print ISBN: 9781107003170, 1107003172. Open the door to a book you never knew existed. You'll never read the Bible the same way again. 9781139533966, 9781283528405, 9781139528115, 9781107003170, 9780521176675, 9781139525725, 1139533967, 1283528401, 1139528114, 1107003172, 0521176670, 1139525727.

This book offers a new perspective on how the Bible is truly meant to be read.
Reviews about The Philosophy of Hebrew Scripture (7):
Freighton
I have been moving in the directly of viewing the Hebrew Bible as philosophical, but Hazony gave me huge kick in the butt in that direction. Long have I wondered why the Bible contains so much narrative if its purpose is to be what many claim. Then I read Alasdair MacIntyre's "After Virtue", in which he argues that morality does not make sense without seeing it actually being lived out. He made perfect sense to me. This is what the OT contains, par excellence.

Nobody would dare impose his beliefs on another culture as many brazenly impose theirs on the Bible. Much of this comes from Christian culture which thinks it knows much more than it does about the Bible. Hazony demonstrates this straightforwardly, but not in a pugnacious or insulting way. He merely gives an accurate (if short) characterization of views with which he disagrees, and then goes on to support his claims with two, three, or even more witnesses.

My two favorite topics were his farmer vs. shepherd dichotomy and his discussion of davar (word/thing, ambiguity intentional) & emet (true/trustworthy). In the Ancient Near East, farmers would live near cities, and be part of city culture. Such culture tends to ossify and become anti-life. In contrast, shepherds are constantly pro-life and can be rebellious against hardened traditions. Hazony argues that it is shepherds with whom God is pleased, because they are the ones who continually wrestle with him, like Jacob did literally. The discussion of davar/emet reveals that the ancient Hebrews had a fundamentally different way of looking at things: instead of asking what is (the Greek question), they ask what *is trustworthy*. A word/thing can be what it appears to be without actually being that word/thing. Knowing the difference is crucial for long-term life. Incidentally, this switch in view makes much more sense of 'faith'/'believe' in the NT.
Velellan
Hazony argues that from the time of the Reformation, Christian theologians and philosophers contrasted the sublime reasoned philosophy of Greece to the revealed word of God spoken through the prophets, who just happened to be Jewish ("How odd of God to choose . . .etc.). With philosophers one could converse across the ages; with revelation, it was take it or leave it. Hazony puts forward a case for the reconsideration of the Hebrew Scriptures as works of reasoned argumentation, presented first to the ancient Hebrew population toward the end of the First Temple Period and during the Babylonian Exile, and centuries later preserved in the process of canonization of the Bible. However readable and persuasive the arguments presented by Hazony in this book, the issues he raises will continued to be discussed and debated. This is the discussion the author wishes to initiate.
Unereel
Hazony focuses this exposition on the contribution of the Hebrew Bible to the exploration and understanding of philosophy and natural law. He typically starts each argument by refuting particular stereotypes about the Hebrew Bible that obstruct its study as a work of philosophy. Some examples of obstructing stereotypes are the Reason - Revelation, Heaven - Earth, and Etermal - Temporal dualities. Another example is the distinction between things and the words used for them. By rejecting the independence between a thing and the word(s) describing it, the Hebrew Bible exercises a definition of truth, where not only can words be true or false, but also objects, things, and people can be true or false. Hazony presents this rejection (or ignorance) of these (predominantly Platonic, Aristotelian, and Christian) dualities as a key advantage when trying to understand the Hebrew Bible philosophically. By reading the Hebrew Bible closer to its own terms, the reader avoids confusing dilemmas and misinterpretations that are caused not by the content of the work itself, but by misleading preconceptions in the mind of the reader.

The book is an easily-read introduction to the topic, not a rigorous exposition. Although he writes against certain aspects of it, Hazony does not engage in polemics against Platonic, Aristotelian, or Christian philosophy/theology as such, nor claim that the philosophical understanding of the Hebrew Bible replaces or overrides other interpretations. The language and style are clear and easy to follow for a general reader, there is little philosophical jargon, and Hebrew words are explained in the text.
Vudogal
This is a truly excellent work of biblical and philosophical scholarship. Hazony persuasively eliminates the conundrum of faith and reason and religion and philosophy in his extremely detailed analyses of the Hebrew Bible with direct references to Greek, Alexandrian and Roman philosophies both in terms of similar ideas and similar modes of expression and reasoning. Readers are given very lucid and intellectually provocative arguments that prove Hazony's insightful theses of how the bible expresses philosophical ideas. His complex arguments are rendered with an authorial candor that is quite impressive. His critical examination of traditional and contemporary biblical exegesis preserves the authenticity of the sacred texts that are presented in great detail. To this close reading of scripture he adds a very erudite interpretation of significant philosophical works that are relevant to an enlightened understanding of a broader application of biblical studies. The overall clarity of this work should be appreciated by both scholars in these interdisciplinary fields and general readers who enjoy an intellectually stimulating experience.
Androrim
This is like rich dessert for the mind! Whether you agree with his line of thinking or not, the re-examining of passages of Hebrew Scripture from a point of view that incorporates faith and intellect together rather than making a binary split is worth the read. I wish that the producers of the kindle version did better proof reading: the typos were annoying (I admit to being an automatic copy editor). Bravo for another stimulating book by Yoram Hazony!

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