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by David. Macaulay

  • ISBN: 0001955454
  • Category: Сhildren's books
  • Author: David. Macaulay
  • Other formats: mbr txt docx lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Camelot Press (1984)
  • Pages: 128 pages
  • FB2 size: 1384 kb
  • EPUB size: 1414 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 299
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David Macaulay (born 2 December 1946) is a British-born American illustrator and writer. His works include Cathedral (1973), The Way Things Work (1988) and The New Way Things Work (1998).

David Macaulay (born 2 December 1946) is a British-born American illustrator and writer. His illustrations have been featured in nonfiction books combining text and illustrations explaining architecture, design and engineering, and he has written a number of children's fiction books

FREE shipping on qualifying offers

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The mills at Wicksbridge are imaginary, but their planning, construction, and operation are quite typical of mills developed in New England throughout the nineteenth century.

In Mill, a School Library Journal Best Book of the Year, David Macaulay pays tribute to the historically important mills of 19th-century New England. Using close-up pen-and-ink illustrations, Macaulay thoroughly explains the Yankee ingenuity that went into the elaborate process of running machines that were generated by the flow of water. In the case of this cotton mill in the imaginary town of Wicksbridge, Macaulay also demonstrates how important the mill was to a community's economic and social viability.

Macaulay has garnered numerous awards including the Caldecott Medal and Honor Awards, the Boston Globe–Horn Book Award, the Christopher Award, an American Institute of Architects Medal, and the Washington Post–Children’s Book Guild Nonfiction Award.

Read Mill, by David Macaulay online on Bookmate – This illustrated look at nineteenth-century New England architecture was named a School Library Journal Best Book of the Year. This book, from the aw. This illustrated look at nineteenth-century New England architecture was named a School Library Journal Best Book of the Year. This book, from the award-winning author of The Way Things Work, takes readers of all ages on a journey through a fictional mill town called Wicksbridge.

David Macaulay is known for his en texts which combine the appeal of children’s picture books with that of an adult coffee table book; delighting readers of all ages.

The mills at Wicksbridge are imaginary, but their planning, construction, and. David Macaulay is known for his en texts which combine the appeal of children’s picture books with that of an adult coffee table book; delighting readers of all ages. Being a fan of Macaulay’s Castle and Cathedral, I next turned to Mill. Mill deviates from the norm of Macaulay’s other works and sadly: not in a good way.

Find this Pin and more on David Macaulay by Maria Stuart. What others are saying. Mill by David MacAulay ~ 1983 Illustrated Book on New England Mills 0395520193.

David Macaulay was born on December 2, 1946 in Lancashire, England. He is a writer, known for Cro (1993), The Way Things Work (2004) and The Way Things Work (1996). He is married to Ruthie. They have two children. How Much Have You Seen? How much of David Macaulay's work have you seen? Known For. Cro Writer.


Reviews about MILL. (7):
Zainn
I read this book aloud to my 4th and 7th grader as we studied the early 1800s in history this year. It is a beautiful book, full of wonderful details--but at times we found it to be a little dry and monotonous (we were also aiming to read it all in one week, so we trudged through several pages at a time). But the depth of understanding of how mills work and how they influenced the landscape of New England proved to be invaluable! Some of my favorite literature is set in the 1800s and reading this book gave me a deeper understanding of how life was back then. A few weeks after reading Mill, we moved on to the Civil War period and read another wonderful book, Turn Homeward, Hannahlee. The main characters in that story are mill hands, so we felt like we enjoyed that story even more, armed with our new knowledge of life around a mill. Now I'm excited to order and read all of David Macaulay's different architecture books to my kids! This book would also be perfect for high schoolers to enjoy reading on their own--or any child who loves to know how things work in great detail!
Vosho
All the David Macaulay books are awesome. He is a superb artist and illustrator. You feel like you've traveled in a time machine to the distant past. His books are absolute treasures. The pictures are almost jaw dropping, they are that good. Wish he had written many more, they are real reference works in history and old technology
Laizel
This is a fascinating account of the life and times of a millwright and his trade. Details on choosing a location for the mill, building the mill, and how the machinery to grind the grain worked puts the reader in the position as the millwright himself. This book is written as part history book, part informational, and even part journal, using fictional diary entries to give the reader a sense of the everyday life of a miller. A touch of drama is thrown in as we read of mill-workers who are injured and/or killed while on the job -
"1864 August 15: Mary McDonnell was drawn into the machinery by the belting today and lost her right arm below the elbow. I fear the heat will not help her recovery
August 17: Mary McDonnell died today, the infection having spread too quickly from her injury. I will send her wages on to her mother in Southbridge."
This book is supposedly written for children - I first discovered it in an elementary school library - but I find it more suitable for adults. I have found that many history books geared toward the younger set can have information not found in the more adult-oriented books. The Mill by David Macaulay is one of them. The illustrations themselves are very well done, and the details of running a mill is probably the best I have seen thus far.
Great reading about the lifeblood of a 19th century community.
roternow
While the fictional story creates the thread by which the development of the mill can be followed, it's the detailed drawings and descriptions that bring a lost industry that once was critical in our early world to life. Macaulay's renderings provide a rich insight into an 18th century mill-- from site planning to the development of the dam and the initial mill works. The growth of the mill is then seen over the decades as it expands and finally falls into disuse as economic conditions contribute to its demise.

Anyone who is familiar with the writing and illustrative stories of artist/author Eric Sloane will enjoy this work as well.
Uste
Loved this book, because in our grade school introduction to American history, nothing was said about these mills or about their critical part in a developing American economy. I wanted to know the parts of the story that had been omitted, and this was one of the best tellings of what these mills were and who engineered them. This story and all Macaulay's other books will be easy to share with young students some day, and for that, I am truly grateful.
Dagdarad
This is an important book. Written for children, it can be used just as effectively by adults to comprehend the beginnings of the industrial revolution in the United States. Learn and see how men tamed our rivers and how men, women and children were swallowed up in these great monuments to progress.
The illustrations are remakable. David Macaulay deftly describes and illustrates how the technology that made America a world industrial power came to the young new country and how American ingenuity improved it and made the nation into a world class economic juggernaut.
The author is a superb story teller, and anyone who would like to visualize the nature of mills and to understand the profound impact of this technology on our country should read it.
I highly recommend this great children's book to everyone.
Contancia
I bought this for my son, who has always been intrigued by construction projects, but I have also enjoyed it quite a bit and learned a lot from it. One point I would make is that it is not quite as simple as some of Macaulay's other books, such as Castle and Cathedral. Whereas those books are easy for even a four-year-old to comprehend, Mill has a more involved story-line and will require more explaining from a parent. I would say that ideally it should be for older children for that reason. But, that doesn't change the fact that it's a great book, and of course the illustrations are amazing.
Mill shows why David Macaulay is the greatest architect artist

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