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by Hilary McKay

  • ISBN: 0575055987
  • Category: Сhildren's books
  • Author: Hilary McKay
  • Subcategory: Literature & Fiction
  • Other formats: lrf mobi txt mbr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Gollancz (1993)
  • Pages: 176 pages
  • FB2 size: 1812 kb
  • EPUB size: 1285 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 745
Download The Exiles at Home fb2

Hilary McKay (born 12 June 1959) is a British writer of children's books.

Hilary McKay (born 12 June 1959) is a British writer of children's books. For her first novel, The Exiles, she won the 1992 Guardian Children's Fiction Prize, a once-in-a-lifetime book award judged by a panel of British children's writers. McKay was born in Boston, Lincolnshire, the eldest of four daughters. She studied English, Zoology and Botany at St Andrews University before becoming a public protection scientist. She currently resides in Derbyshire with her husband, Kevin.

In Hilary Mckay's second book in The Exiles series, The Exiles at Home, the four delightfully troublesome siblings manage to get themselves into yet more mischief. When Ruth Conroy decides to sponsor a child in Africa, she is unprepared for the monthly monetary commitment and is shocked by how difficult it is to find £10 a month. McKay has created a boisterous, chaotic family which always makes me want to rush out and adopt three sisters. TES. Books by Hilary McKay.

The Exiles At Home book. Hilary McKay invented four quirky sisters who individually try their parents' patience in this Exiles series. The English sisters sponsor a boy in Africa and must come up with 10 pounds every month to support him in school. Where do 4 children repeatedly acquire 10 pounds?

This item:The Exiles at Home by Hilary McKay Paperback £1. 9

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Hilary McKay's Fairy Tales was her first book with Macmillan Children's Books and is a critically acclaimed collection of clever retellings. Her 2018 title The Skylarks' War marks the centenary of the end of the First World War and was the winner of the Costa Children's Book Award 2018. It is a classic in the making. The Exiles at Home" shows the sisters uniting to achieve a particular goal, and even manages to work in a bit of pathos towards the end; rather touching. But in general the mood of the story was very humourous, and I did find myself chuckling out loud now and again as I read the story.

Author Hilary McKay. A tender, sweet, and hilarious novel about growing up with a loving family and a perfectly rambunctious dog, from an author who "has set the standard of brilliance" (Horn Book). When she was eight, Binny's life was perfect: She had her father's wonderful stories and Max, the best dog ever. But after her father's sudden death, money is tight, and Aunty Violet decides to give Max away-he is just too big for their cramped new life. Clarry and her older brother Peter live for their summers in Cornwall, staying with their grandparents and running free with their charismatic cousin, Rupert.

McElderry Books ; Toronto : Maxwell Macmillan Canada ; New York : Maxwell Macmillan International.

Sisters, Family life, Moneymaking projects, Grandmothers, Humorous stories, Sisters, Families, Fund raising, Grandmothers, Humorous stories. McElderry Books ; Toronto : Maxwell Macmillan Canada ; New York : Maxwell Macmillan International. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana.

I recently finished the second book in Hilary McKay's Exiles trilogy, titled "The Exiles at Home. I had enjoyed the previous title in the series ("The Exiles") well enough, and this one was even better  . Exiles at Home is instead a rich and complex and laugh-out-loud great book.

The Conroy sisters are back! In Hilary Mckay's second book in The Exiles series, The Exiles at Home, the four delightfully troublesome siblings manage to get themselves into yet more mischief. When Ruth Conroy decides to sponsor a child in Africa, she is unprepared for the monthly monetary commitment and is shocked by how difficult it is to find GBP10 a month.

The Skylarks' War/ Love to Everyone - The Background Behind the Story. How Not To Starve A Vegan.


Reviews about The Exiles at Home (5):
Kalrajas
I agree with the other reviewers on the main points. Hilary McKay is quite funny although I think her humor is most likely to be appreciated by adults. One of the pleasures of these novels is the way the Conroy girls resist the adult world and the way that adult world reacts in response.(The mother is described as being furiously bewildered toward the end of the book. A state that I bet most parents are familiar with.)
The other reviewers mention that the girls' troubles start when Ruth signs up to sponsor the education of an African boy even though she is too young to do so. She and her sisters have to raise ten pounds a month.
The thing about these girls is that they seem so clueless in the world. Maybe because they are such great readers they seem to have no ability to judge how their schemes will work out in the world let alone how moral their schemes are. The results are comical, annoying, somewhat dangerous and culminate in what would have been petty theft if it had succeeded.
The amazing thing is that McKay has succeeded in making them so likable. The girls have an obduracy about them that seems so like so many of the kids I know (including my own daughters). This is what I mean by the darkness of these books. McKay has presented us with characters as morally self-serving, as amoral as many kids really are. She has also presented us with a good story about such kids growing up a little(not least by having to face up to their mother).
I have been reading these books to my girls (5 and 7). They may be a little young for the books but they have lots and lots of questions about the girls and my daughters like these books very much. So do I. I recommend them wholeheartedly to parents who want to read something to their kids that will amuse and bewilder them as they read and will lead to good discussions.
Adrietius
I loved it all the way through. The story is amazingly well thought. You laugh and cry at just the right moments. The girls' resourcefulness is impressive... you can play and replay the book in your mind and keep laughing.
Malien
I recently finished the second book in Hilary McKay's Exiles trilogy, titled "The Exiles at Home."

I had enjoyed the previous title in the series ("The Exiles") well enough, and this one was even better. I think the Bastable children (created by author Edith Nesbit) will always be my favourites in the "goofy-group-of-children-who-always-are-getting-into-trouble" genre, but I did warm up to the Conroy sisters a bit more in this book. They came across as a shade more likeable and less self-involved in this story (as compared to the first), primarily because all of their misadventures were the result of their trying to help others. This book is also more tightly plotted than was "The Exiles," which was a loose collection of "what we did on our summer holidays" stories. "The Exiles at Home" shows the sisters uniting to achieve a particular goal, and even manages to work in a bit of pathos towards the end; rather touching. But in general the mood of the story was very humourous, and I did find myself chuckling out loud now and again as I read the story.

Hmmm, speaking of the Bastable children, in a way this book has a theme similar to Nesbit's "The Story of the Treasure Seekers," in that the children are desparate to make money, and carry out many ill-advised schemes to that end...
Геракл
Problems start for Ruth Conroy when she secretly decides to sponser a young boy in Africa so that he can go to school. Tyring to raise ten pounds a month is not as simple as she first thought, though, and so she has to let her sister, Naomi into the secret and together they come up with wierd and wonderful ways to earn the money. The Little Ones, Rachel and Phoebe aren't kept out of the secret for long though, and decide to help by selling sandwiches at school, which are made in next door's dog kennell! This hirarious book is a must for all lovers of 'The Exiles'.
Wooden Purple Romeo
Pay no attention to the School Library Journal review, which describes this book's conflict as "single and simple." Exiles at Home is instead a rich and complex and laugh-out-loud great book. The Conroy sisters, first introduced in The Exiles (because they are sent to spend the summer, "in exile," with their Big Grandma) must come up with 10 pounds a month to send for the education of a boy they have promised to sponsor in Africa. Their increasingly frantic attempts to raise the money involve them in bank robbery (what they think is bank robbery, anyway), an ill-advised kind of catering service (they make "squashy" marmalade sandwiches in the only private place they can find, the dog's kennel, and then sell them to the other kids at school, especially to a desperate character they call "The Thin One"), and some very questionable babysitting tactics (when baby Peter shows signs of learning good behavior and therefore outgrowing the need for their services, they remind him of how to get dirty and mash his food into his hair). And you will meet other wonderful characters along the way, including Joseck, the boy in Africa, Toby and Emma, the elderly couple who employ the girls as gardeners, and the fabulous Big Grandma herself. I am a school librarian and my sixth grade teachers have asked me to recommend a new readaloud title--this is it, hands-down, my number one recommendation.

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