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by Fabian Negrin,Joanne Oppenheim

  • ISBN: 1841482455
  • Category: Сhildren's books
  • Author: Fabian Negrin,Joanne Oppenheim
  • Subcategory: Geography & Cultures
  • Other formats: docx rtf lrf doc
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Barefoot Books (October 1, 2003)
  • Pages: 32 pages
  • FB2 size: 1179 kb
  • EPUB size: 1223 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 305
Download The Miracle of the First Poinsettia fb2

Illustrator Fabian Negrin studied art in Mexico City. While I have this 'companion' book to the Miracle of the Poinsettia by Brian Cavanaugh (published 2001), I find the Oppenheim Spanish translation rather stilted and far more difficult, even for the very fluent young child to follow.

Illustrator Fabian Negrin studied art in Mexico City. His illustrations evoke the style of Mexican muralists, especially reminiscent of some of Diego Rivera’s work. In particular, the illustration on the left brings to mind Rivera’s mural painting, The Flower Seller. Also, the illustrations are dark and a bit gloomy in comparison to the luminous and richly colorful images of Cavanaugh's version.

Oppenheim’s story is a retelling of a traditional Mexican myth about the creation of the first Poinsettia flowers in. .

Oppenheim’s story is a retelling of a traditional Mexican myth about the creation of the first Poinsettia flowers in Mexico. These flowers are sometimes called flores de la Noche Buena, or flowers of The Miracle of the First Poinsettia, written by Joanne Oppenheim and illustrated by Fabian Negrin, is a holiday tale best for ages 5-9. It is written in English with Spanish words interspersed throughout, and tells the story of a young, Mexican girl who learns to give gifts from the heart.

Life Create an environment that puts wellbeing first. Homepage Book List Christmas. The Miracle of the First Poinsettia by Joanne Oppenheim, Fabian Negrin (1841483648). Download resources to support teaching now!

Oppenheim tells the familiar story of the first Poinsettia (also the subject of picture books by Tomie de Paola and Pat .

Oppenheim tells the familiar story of the first Poinsettia (also the subject of picture books by Tomie de Paola and Pat Mora) with a sure hand. Juanita, a poor child in rural Mexico longs for a Christmas gift for the Christ child. A stone angel tells her to pick some weeds; when they're transformed miraculously into beautiful red flowers, they become the perfect gift.

Fabian Negrin is a native Argentinean whose magical, dreamlike paintings have illuminated the pages of five other books for children . Fabian lived in Mexico for many years and now makes his home in Italy with his wife and son.

Fabian Negrin is a native Argentinean whose magical, dreamlike paintings have illuminated the pages of five other books for children, including The Secret Footprints (Knopf, 2000) and Gauchada (Knopf, 2001). This is his first title for Barefoot Books.

By Fabian Negrin, Joanne Oppenheim. Retells the story of a girl's discovery of a Christmas miracle. Other Books You Might Like.

In this extraordinary collaboration, Fabian Negrin brings his warm, glowing scenes to Joanne Oppenheim's thoughtful narrative which explores the traditional Mexican tale of how the first poinsettia came to be, transporting.

In this extraordinary collaboration, Fabian Negrin brings his warm, glowing scenes to Joanne Oppenheim's thoughtful narrative which explores the traditional Mexican tale of how the first poinsettia came to be, transporting readers to Old-World Mexico and into the arms of a young girl as her trust leads her straight into a miracle. A lot of things to talk about. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 11 years ago. A really different Christmas book. It is the retelling of an old story in picture book form. This would go along well with learning about how Christmas is celebrated in Mexico. It is a great story too.

First Poinsettia, written by Joanne Oppenheim and illustrated by Fabian Negrin .

Keeping these educational bonuses in mind, Negrin’s stunning illustrations will dazzle the yuletide imaginations of readers young and old as they are told of the first Poinsettia flowers in Mexico.

Originally native to Mexico, beautiful poinsettia plants decorate homes around the world every holiday season. But few people who love the plant s deep red tones know the traditional Mexican tale about how the poinsettia first came to be. In this extraordinary collaboration, Fabian Negrin brings his warm, glowing scenes to Joanne Oppenheim s thoughtful narrative, transporting readers to Old-World Mexico and into the arms of a young girl as her trust leads her straight into a miracle. A beautiful alternative to the traditional nativity story, this book is a wonderful evocation of Mexican customs and culture.
Reviews about The Miracle of the First Poinsettia (6):
Fordrellador
This is a terrific story! I teach at a primarily Hispanic-dominant school and my students love hearing this story about Christmas and the Poinsettia. The pictures are wonderful and the story is very heart-warming. I definitely recommend this book!
MisterQweene
I would give this a negative rating if i could but the lowest i could rate is a 1 star. I never recieved my books. I had ordered this stuff weeks before Christmas with the intention of giving them as gifts. Well that never happened!
Sharpmane
The Miracle of the First Poinsettia, written by Joanne Oppenheim and illustrated by Fabian Negrin, is a holiday tale best for ages 5-9. It is written in English with Spanish words interspersed throughout, and tells the story of a young, Mexican girl who learns to give gifts from the heart. Oppenheim’s story is a retelling of a traditional Mexican myth about the creation of the first Poinsettia flowers in Mexico. These flowers are sometimes called “flores de la Noche Buena,” or “flowers of Christmas Eve.” According to Oppenheim’s Author’s Note: “They decorate homes and churches all over the world at Christmas time. In Mexico they are so plentiful they still go like weeds. They brighten gardens and remind us of hope, the joy and the miracle of Christmas!” With glowing illustrations, this tale of love and kindness will surely warm the hearts of readers as the winter chill sets in.

Oppenheim, in her “Author’s Note,” comments upon the transitory beauty of myths and legends: “It is always different, yet the same. That is what keeps folktales alive—telling them and retelling them in different ways. Perhaps the reason this story lives on is because it is a miracle story that reminds us of the true spirit of giving.” This lovely retelling, coupled with Negrin’s mesmerizing illustrations, make for a truly enchanting tale. As Kirkus Reviews notes,

Negrin’s intense oil-and-wax pastel, colored-pencil, and watercolor illustrations border on the surreal, with their bold use of modeling and contrasting deep blues, reds, and glowing gold. They also provide authentic details and decorations of papel picado, birds, butterflies, and flowers. A Christmas gem.

Illustrator Fabian Negrin studied art in Mexico City. His illustrations evoke the style of Mexican muralists, especially reminiscent of some of Diego Rivera’s work. In particular, the illustration on the left brings to mind Rivera’s mural painting, The Flower Seller. While reading this holiday tale, educators could also take the time to teach students about the history of Mexican muralism and the role of art in society. As Art History Resources inquires, “What is the goal of art? To what extent is art supposed to be autonomous and separated from everyday life? What does public art accomplish?” Mexican mural art has been a recurrent theme amongst my book reviews, and it is both an important and fascinating element of Mexican culture and society. Keeping these educational bonuses in mind, Negrin’s stunning illustrations will dazzle the yuletide imaginations of readers young and old as they are told of the first Poinsettia flowers in Mexico.

The story begins on the day before La Noche Buena, or Christmas Eve. Las Posadas, which translates into English as “the inns” or “the lodgings” is widely celebrated across Mexico during the days leading up to La Noche Buena, from December 16-24. According to Britannica, “Las Posadas commemorates the journey that Joseph and Mary made from Nazareth to Bethlehem in search of a safe refuge where Mary could give birth to the baby Jesus.” The religious ceremony is accompanied by a variety of cultural traditions, celebrated across Mexico:

Each evening during the festival, a small child dressed as an angel leads a procession through the streets of the town. The procession is primarily made up of children dressed in silver and gold robes carrying lit candles and images of Mary and Joseph riding a donkey. Adults, including musicians, follow the procession, which visits selected homes and asks for lodging for Joseph and Mary. Traditionally, the procession is always refused lodging, though the hosts often provide refreshments. At each stop, passages of scripture are read and Christmas carols are sung. Mass is held each day after the procession, and, at the conclusion of the service, children break open piñatas filled with candy, toys, and, occasionally, money. The piñatas are usually crafted in the form of a star, which was said to have guided the three wise men of biblical tradition to the newborn Jesus.

In this children’s book, we learn about the holiday through the perspective of Nita, a young girl living “high in the mountains of Mexico”. Nita’s father has just lost his job, and Nita is worried that she will not have enough pesos to buy gifts for her family, or to bring to the church on the night of La Noche Buena, as the holiday tradition requires. As Nita walks around the market looking for gifts to buy with her few pesos, the reader follows her through the festive, luminous streets of Mexico. Negrin’s illustrations match Oppenheim’s account of her childhood trips to Mexico during the holidays: “Mexico City was like a fairyland with festive lights on every street and markets full of gifts.” The reader can spot artisanal puppets, piñatas, and masks, heaping piles of fruits and spices, strings of papel picado, candle-lit windows, and even fireworks in the distant sky. The village is in full celebration, but Nita still has a heavy heart.

As the yuletide tale unfolds, Nita learns that money cannot buy love and happiness. She is reminded of the internal values that outshine any object bought in the market, while her mother gently reassures her. Despite her temporary sadness, Nita finds that she is in fact rich with love and family. The moral of the story is especially important, since the Christmas season is often overwhelmed by consumerism and materialism, especially here in the United States. Nita discovers what it really means to give as she witnesses the miracle of the first poinsettia.

For access to the complete review and additional resources, check out our Vamos a Leer blog at teachinglatinamericathroughliterature.com.
Fonceiah
While I have this 'companion' book to the Miracle of the Poinsettia by Brian Cavanaugh (published 2001), I find the Oppenheim Spanish translation rather stilted and far more difficult, even for the very fluent young child to follow. Also, the illustrations are dark and a bit gloomy in comparison to the luminous and richly colorful images of Cavanaugh's version. I have given several of these books as gifts -- with a lukewarm response. Whereas the Cavanugh book has been received by many many friends, teachers and co-workers with a sense of awe for the illustrations, story and mystery it excudes. I would urge a reading of both versions. See for yourselves!
Hunaya
A really different Christmas book. It is the retelling of an old story in picture book form. This would go along well with learning about how Christmas is celebrated in Mexico. It is a great story too. It also opens up a chance to talk about gift giving and the importance of keeping perspective. I would recommend it for all ages.
Thomand
I like this book because of the main character, Juanita. She is very brave because even though she thinks all the people would stare at her because she is bringing weeds to the baby Jesus she goes into the church. Another reason I like the story is when she goes into the church the weeds turn into flowers and this is a great surprise.

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