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by Alexander Sturgis

  • ISBN: 1402706502
  • Category: Сhildren's books
  • Author: Alexander Sturgis
  • Subcategory: Arts Music & Photography
  • Other formats: mbr docx lrf doc
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Sterling (February 15, 2003)
  • FB2 size: 1767 kb
  • EPUB size: 1488 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 986
Download Optical Illusions in Art: Or--Discover How Paintings Aren't Always What They Seem To Be fb2

Optical Illusions in Art book.

Optical Illusions in Art book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Optical Illusions in Art: Or-Discover How Paintings Aren't Always What They Seem To Be. by. Alexander Sturgis.

His highly engaging book proves that art can stimulate the mind as well as the senses. In fact, the book's designer was so enamored of his Photoshop skills that he chose to print that painting twice on the same page! The second, and closer, view is part of an elaborate, somewhat cutesy and unnecessary "illumination" of the page's heading text.

by Alexander Sturgis. in Art : Or - Discover How Paintings Aren't Always What They Seem to Be.

book by Alexander Sturgis. Optical Illusions in Art : Or - Discover How Paintings Aren't Always What They Seem to Be. by Alexander Sturgis.

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker highly engaging.

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker. This vivid introduction to the use of illusion in art makes often complex visual effects understandable and fun. Chapters on trompe l'oeil, surrealism, perspective, anamorphosis, reversible images and op art explain the concepts with remarkable clarity; handsome reproductions, including works by artists as diverse as Raphael and Magritte, Holbein and Dali, are riveting.

Check out these 10 unbelievable optical illusion paintings. In life and in art, perception is reality. Things aren’t always what they seem to b. r are they? Over the years, artists have tried to used the power of illusions with mind-blowing paintings to challenge the human mind. Their works often leave us in awe, as we are left to ponder on the details of creating such strong and enlightening images. Here are ten mind-bending works of art from artists spanning several generations that will cause you to question reality. These artists use architectural precision and creative license to show you a world of impossible realities.

From The Dress to legless women, the internet is filled with optical illusions that are both accidental and intentional. Daniel Hoerr posted a photo of Colorado's farmland to Reddit after he realized the flat land seemed to be 3D. It's actually flat farmland in Colorado. The Colorado Climate Center believes it's because of the unusual way snow fell in the region, along with the unique terrain itself. These strawberries aren't red. There's no red in this image. Akiyoshi Kitaoka/Twitter.

ng Connections: Perspective in art Optical illusions in art optical illusions History of optical illusions History of. .Library descriptions. A look at optical illusions in art with many pictorial examples.

Library descriptions.

An optical illusion (also called a visual illusion) is an illusion caused by the visual system and characterized by a visual percept that arguably appears to differ from reality. Illusions come in a wide variety; their categorization is difficult because the underlying cause is often not clear but a classification proposed by Richard Gregory is useful as an orientation.

Bright Side has collected 26 visual illusions that will prove that your own brain can deceive yo. And here are some animated optical illusions.

Bright Side has collected 26 visual illusions that will prove that your own brain can deceive you. And at the end of the article, there is a bonus that will make your head spin. Scroll this picture up and down and the squares will move. And these things that look like snakes are motionless.

Beautifully reproduced masterworks, in a lie-flat, spiral-bound book for easy viewing “Handsome reproductions, including works by artists as diverse as Raphael and Magritte, Holbein and Dali, are riveting.”—Publishers Weekly. “Encourages young readers to analyze and discover ways the artist has worked.”—Arts & Activities: A Quick Pick for Reluctant Readers’ Choice 1997.
Reviews about Optical Illusions in Art: Or--Discover How Paintings Aren't Always What They Seem To Be (3):
Steep
This brief introduction to the topic is informative and well-made, but some parents may want to take a look before buying for their kids.

When I opened this I was pleased to find that, as I'd hoped, the publisher had indeed made some effort to print this book well. Witness the spiral binding that allows the pages to lie flat, for instance. Pictures look great, and the paper has a good, sturdy feel.

The layout does get a little crowded here and there, but generally things are explained well, and many subtopics are covered. So I was very enthusiastic to find such a book at a bargain price, but there is one editorial decision that potentially upsets the whole apple cart.

One page shows a 15th century trompe l'oeil ceiling painting from an Italian palace. As one looks up toward the ceiling, one gets the impression of looking up past a series of balconies and ledges, to the sky somewhat distantly above it all.

Since it was the 15th century and all, the painter perched several little boy cherubim (angels) on some of those ledges, wearing wings -- but no clothes. And since we're below them, we're looking straight up at their... well, just figure it out.

The author was careful not to describe them as angels (thus removing complex Renaissance religious notions from the discussion). But he evidently did not think young readers would notice, or snicker over, or otherwise get distracted, by the unusual and unexpected view of those little angels', um, equipment.

In fact, the book's designer was so enamored of his Photoshop skills that he chose to print that painting *twice* on the same page! The second, and closer, view is part of an elaborate, somewhat cutesy and unnecessary "illumination" of the page's heading text.

One doesn't want to be unnecessarily prudish, especially when discussing art, after all. But there is a lot of "fine art" that one might not want to share with a kid until he/she is in the upper reaches of grade school or middle school, at least. So, perhaps we'll have to put this book away for a few years, or find something else to replace it.

For parents bold enough to ignore those concerns... the text in this book is probably accessible to a third grader and up, if a grownup is nearby to explain some of the longer words. The pictures are, of course, interesting to look at by themselves. So I'd think that parents might be able to share it with children of nearly any age by reading the text to them, then turning the kids loose.
Netlandinhabitant
This book is a great intro to optical illusions.
Ylal
Even at this low price, the book is a huge disappointment. As a previous reviewer wrote, the book is spiral bound and all of 32 pages but it is good quality paper.

There are some nice clear pictures but there are multiple pictures on each page. So each picture is too small to be worth much.

If you are looking for a book with a very shallow introduction to various painting and drawing techniques, this is just OK.

If you want a book with a lot more substance, I recommend that you look elsewhere.

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