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by Warner Francis Davis

  • ISBN: 160264571X
  • Category: Biographies
  • Author: Warner Francis Davis
  • Subcategory: Memoirs
  • Other formats: rtf azw lit txt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Virtualbookworm.com Publishing (July 15, 2010)
  • Pages: 170 pages
  • FB2 size: 1122 kb
  • EPUB size: 1186 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 140
Download Peace in a Mad Dog World: Finding Security When My Need for Control Had Failed Me fb2

Although Warner had gone to the States by then, his parents were still at Lodja when the rebellion of the mid-60s broke out.

Warner Davis's Peace in a Mad Dog World is a testament to the calling of his father to bring God to the people of the Congo and a testament to the sacrifices made by his mother in support of her husband's mission. Warner writes of his childhood as a missionary's son who deals in his own way with an all too real "mad dog" who appears throughout the narrative in the form of malarial mosquitoes,dangerous wild animals, hostile rebels, and a harsh boarding school teacher. Although Warner had gone to the States by then, his parents were still at Lodja when the rebellion of the mid-60s broke out.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Peace in a Mad Dog World: Finding Security When My Need for Control Had Failed Me as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

So opens Warner Davis's memoir. Beginning with a rabid dog's attack he survives, a suspenseful story unfolds of his dealing with fierce uncertainty

Peace In A Mad Dog World: Finding Security When My Need for Control had Failed Me is a book writen by Warner Francis Davis covering the 10 years of his boyhood in a region that is home to malarial mosquitoes, ravenous driver ants, prowling lions, 30-foot-long pythons, and highly venomous mambas. So opens Warner Davis's memoir. Beginning with a rabid dog's attack he survives, a suspenseful story unfolds of his dealing with fierce uncertainty. His sense of vulnerability reaches fever pitch when he runs into a poisinous snake on his way to the bathroom in the dead of night.

Peace can't be achieved in the outside world unless we have peace on the inside. Mark Williams and Danny Penman's book gives us this peace. I have been practicing and reading about both on a regular basis. Here's a list of the best books that I have found on the subject for anyone who's interested: Authentic Happiness: Using the New Positive Psychology to Realize Your Potential for Lasting Fulfillment by Martin E. P. Seligman - Dr. Seligman is basically the founder of the Positive Psychology movement.

Peace comes from being able to contribute the best that we have, and all that we are, toward creating a world that .

Peace comes from being able to contribute the best that we have, and all that we are, toward creating a world that supports everyone. This hand, to tyrants ever sworn the foe, For freedom only deals the deadly blow; Then sheathes in calm repose the vengeful blade, For gentle peace in freedom's hallowed shade.

You hold on to the drum but you’re missing the beat Love keeps you grounded like it’s chained to your feet Point at the heart and the heart’s moving on Try to name what you feel and the feeling is gone. You have a god to forgive you it’s a privilege you have You have a book that starts with a bret easton ellis autograph Bottles to empty and prescriptions to fill And if no god will forgive you baby you know i will. It’s a mad mad world if you want to get it on. More on Genius. Mad World" Track Info. Written By Maarten Devoldere. Release Date September 6, 2017.

During the second world war Burmese and Indonesian nationalists allied .

During the second world war Burmese and Indonesian nationalists allied themselves with the Japanese, finding them a useful lever against the colonial power. None has improved on Palmerston's dictum that Britain has no permanent friends or enemies, only permanent interests. Peace-keeping, peace-keeper and cease-fire are also spelt as one or two words. 7. Supplementary Reader. Yesterday the Security Council passed a resolution warning all waning parties that they must abide by the latest cease-fire before peace-keepers can be sent. The Phnom Penh government and its three guerrilla rivals unexpectedly agreed to a ceasefire.

Warner Davis spends 10 years of his boyhood in a region that is home to malarial mosquitoes, ravenous driver ants, prowling lions, 30-foot-long pythons, and highly venomous mambas. It is also a land of intertribal warfare, rebel occupations, and anarchic government. His father's call to serve as a missionary in the Belgian Congo and his mother's eventual acceptance of that summons land them, his sister and him in tow, in this world seemingly abandoned to unleashed chaos. Beginning with a rabid dog's attack he survives, a suspenseful story unfolds of Warner's dealing with a fierce uncertainty. His sense of vulnerability reaches fever pitch when he runs into a poisonous snake on his way to the bathroom in the dead of the night. Frightening as is this close call, and as overwhelming as is the subsequent death of his best friend, his breaking point comes years later when his mother is losing her battle with cancer. Engulfed in the darkness of despair, light breaks through when Warner, drawing inspiration from the courageous role models in his life, reaches a conscious decision to embrace their faith as his own.
Reviews about Peace in a Mad Dog World: Finding Security When My Need for Control Had Failed Me (7):
Uste
Here is a unique combination of engrossing autobiography, wide-ranging travelogue, slam-bang adventure, and refreshing affirmation of Divine Providence -- all in one relatively small volume. Do not plan on reading this book twenty pages at a sitting. Once you have landed in the Congo with three-year-old Warner Francis Davis and his missionary family, you will stay with him to story's end. I did, and, according to their unsolicited comments, so have others to whom I have recommended this book. It is a page-turner. Davis's story of his quest for peace within, amidst the roiling dangers of the 1960's Belgian Congo, is so inherently interesting, exciting, informative, and inspiring that it would travel under its own steam, even if poorly written. It is not. Davis's prose is lucid and vigorous. Yet he is careful and disciplined. He does not permit himself the liberties of mawkish sentimentality or effusive overstatement that so often debase personal religious testimony or dilute the credibility of purported autobiography. His cobras and lions and crocs and guerilla gunmen - and the "mad dog" - are really there. And so are Davis's nascent, then maturing, then mature faith and courage, as real as real can be. And so is the unseen Presence, toward whom this gifted writer so skillfully points us with his absorbing story.
Vispel
Warner Davis's Peace in a Mad Dog World is a testament to the calling of his father to bring God to the people of the Congo and a testament to the sacrifices made by his mother in support of her husband's mission. Warner writes of his childhood as a missionary's son who deals in his own way with an all too real "mad dog" who appears throughout the narrative in the form of malarial mosquitoes,dangerous wild animals, hostile rebels, and a harsh boarding school teacher. Despite the Congo's dangers, Warner's mother holds her family close and demonstrates a wonderful sense of humor that helps young Warner overcome his fears. Anyone with a strong calling in life will relate to this book. I'm the wife of a military officer who served his country in peace and war (yes, we both served and so did our kids) and I can see a parallel--God, honor and country for the soldier and God, ministry, and humanity for the missionary.
Gadar
A penetrating look into the heart of a missionary kid growing up in the former Belgium Congo...never have I read a more revealing look into the reality being a missionary kid, far from home, dealing with all kinds of uncertainties at an early age. The reader is taken on an inner journey where we confront our own insecurities and anxieties amid our need for some kind of control.

You do not see this kind of vulnerable, raw expose of missionary life very often and it is as refreshing as it is inspirational. I loved it!
Zugar
If you grew up or worked in Congo, you will be particularly interested in this book, for it is the story of ten years of Warner's childhood in the Kasai and Katanga provinces of Congo in the 1950s and early 1960s. Others will also find it interesting. The mission stations he lived at were Dingele (where Ototela was spoken), Lodja, and the city of Elizabethville (now Lubumbashi), and his boarding schools were Minga, and Central School at Lubondai.

This is also a book of spiritual development, with Warner examining his own childhood anxieties and how he overcame them. Several times he quotes the words of hymns and scripture verses that have been most meaningful to his spiritual growth, and he describes the lives of people like Dr. Hughlett whose examples inspired him and helped him overcome his fears.

And there is a lot to fear, in his perspective--snakes in the dormitory room where he slept, a lion that tracked him, a 30-foot python that almost strangled Pierre Shaumba, a leopard that almost killed a friend's dog, driver ants that invaded their home, a hippo that bumped their canoe, a bat that landed on his back while in bed, and mosquitoes that brought malaria ("two or three times a year I was jolted awake in the dead of night, my head ablaze with fever and my stomach churning with nausea." (18) And finally a rabid dog that bit him, an incident that led to the book's title. His own dog was also bitten, and had to be shot.

"I ran to my room as floodgates inside me burst, an unstoppable flow of grief. Falling on my bed, I wailed, bemoaning the loss of my dog and more besides. I cried for the vicious ill will and limitations of human hands, for sickness and the finality of death, for a world out of control and the fears of living." (8)

Even fun adventures, like swinging on vines, could turn badly, as when he fell and broke his arm. "But that is life for you, especially in the Congo. One moment it is sweet; the next sour." (52)

In addition to the physical there were the socio-political dangers, as he puts it: "intertribal warfare, rebel occupations, and anarchic government." Warner describes an incident handled by his parents, no doubt at Dingele, of an armed conflict "between two factions of the tribe they served--one geographically associated with the forest, the other with the plains." (43-44)

These are all true stories; similar incidents during my childhood somehow seemed less dangerous than all that, but no doubt Warner' interpretation contributes to the overall theme of fearing first than overcoming those fears next. He is, after all, a preacher now.

The early 1960s were indeed among the most anarchic of Congo's history, with secessions in Katanga and Kasai followed by rebellions in the East and the Kwilu. The Davises were living in Elizabethville/Lubumbashi when fighting broke out between the U.N. and the Katangese troops during the latter's secession, with windows of their house being shattered as fighting went on, "the sharp sounds of a single cannon, the chattering of machinegun fire, big guns booming, the high scream of mortar fire." (35) After two or three days, during a cease-fire, the family left for Northern Rhodesia (Zambia now) next door.

Readers will enjoy the descriptions of the mission station, and the missionary household with helpers: "Now, we depended on a generator, kerosene lamps, and flashlights for light. Now, water had to be boiled before drinking. Now, common food on the table was rice, manioc and tinned corn beef." (14-15).

Warner has loving portraits of his parents and their conduct in their work and toward him and his sister Diane. He fondly mentions several missionary families. He was homeschooled until age 8 or 9, then sent off to boarding school at Minga . As he went, "I was, in fact, crying within. And several years later an adult, I was still carrying around an unmentionable sadness." (58) He kept it in, and didn't cry openly. "And today, I harbor no bitter feelings for that amazing consecration. I have only the deepest respect and admiration for two people who gave themselves away for the good of others." (61).

Boarding school for missionaries' children at Minga was 200 km. away. They did have radio contact with their parents once a week. He has fond memories of Sunday night hymn sings, climbing trees, playing card games and chess, soccer, hide and seek, tag, and cops & robbers. They went on outings to a lake in the region, and to a huge crater.

A great tragedy for Warner was the death of his best friend Ricky, who died during heart surgery in 1958 while he was with his parents on furlough in the States.

Warner describes the awkwardness of living in the States during furloughs after four years in Africa: "It was hard to fit in. Being from Africa, I felt like an oddball...what could I talk about with my peers? It was hard to carry on a conversation, having been out of the sports, music, and movies loop." (98)

Returning from furlough in 1961, Warner was sent to a boarding school in Southern Rhodesia for a year. It turned out to have a very negative environment, a "culture of fear", and lots of violence. The next year he was in Central School and his parents at Lodja. Flying in a small plane over Lodja, "it hit me as never before that we were living in the middle of nowhere." (112)

Although Warner had gone to the States by then, his parents were still at Lodja when the rebellion of the mid-60s broke out. Several missionaries at Wembo Nyama were held by the rebels in 1964, and Burleigh Law was killed by them. (115) Warner's father was stationed at Lodja with Burleigh at the time, so it was a time of great anxiety for Warner.

The next to final chapter is situated in Kentucky, where Warner' mother is dying of cancer, although it diminished enough for a while so that she was able to spend another three years in Congo. His mother's illness was of course an anguishing situation for the author, but he was able to reflect about the memorial service. "The ceremony's declaration, grounded in the remembrance of her faith, had an authoritative ring that silenced the cry of fear. It sealed the decision my sister and I had made a few weeks before on the battleground for control--to let go of Mother and entrust her to the hands of Almighty God." (149)

And in the Epilogue Warner, in the States, describes encounters with two other sources of anxiety, a disease in his ear, and his father's car accident. In conclusion, he finds strength in the verse "Be still and know that I am God." And he concludes "This persistent word proved a tonic. As its soothing message seeped in the caverns of my mind, I began to sense the budding stage of a quiet confidence from a new level of faith." (164)

Those missionaries and missionaries kids out there who served in Congo will want to buy this book, Others should read it as well for the insights it gives into missionary life and Congo during that period of the 1950s and 1960s.

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