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by Wes Nisker

  • ISBN: 006251766X
  • Category: Biographies
  • Author: Wes Nisker
  • Subcategory: Leaders & Notable People
  • Other formats: mobi mbr mobi lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: HarperOne; 1 edition (April 1, 2003)
  • Pages: 224 pages
  • FB2 size: 1431 kb
  • EPUB size: 1637 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 529
Download Big Bang, The Buddha, and the Baby Boom: The Spiritual Experiments of My Generation fb2

is the best chronicle yet written about the spiritual adventures of our generation.

is the best chronicle yet written about the spiritual adventures of our generation. Joseph Goldstein, author of One Dharma: The Emerging Western Buddhism). his wry, hip, fast, breezy. romp is a tender triumph.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Big Bang, the Buddha, and .

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Big Bang, the Buddha, and the Baby Boom: The Spiritual Experiments of My Generation.

The Big Bang, The Buddha, and the Baby Boom: The Spiritual Experiments of My Generation. Gach, Gary (December 6, 1998). What Would the Buddha Say to Darwin?". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved February 13, 2009. ISBN 978-0-06-251767-8. Crazy Wisdom Saves the World Again!: Handbook for a Spiritual Revolution. ISBN 978-1-933330-69-3. You Are Not Your Fault and Other Revelations: The Collected Wit and Wisdom of Wes "Scoop" Nisker. ISBN 978-1-61902-769-5.

Hang on for a Wild Journey through the Political and Spiritual Adventures of the Baby-Boom Generation Join Wes "Scoop" Nisker as he takes us on a hilarious, wild ride through the heyday of the Beats and the Hippies and the birth of the modern environmental movement, and the surge.

Hang on for a Wild Journey through the Political and Spiritual Adventures of the Baby-Boom Generation Join Wes "Scoop" Nisker as he takes us on a hilarious, wild ride through the heyday of the Beats and the Hippies and the birth of the modern environmental movement, and the surge of Buddhism in the West.

He takes us through the Beat, Hippie, and New Age movements to the present, more mature, spiritual association with Eastern philosophy and Buddhism in particular. While not a deep book, it does give some insight into the history of the Buddhist movement in the United States and why Buddhism is as popular as it is now. To a large degree this popularity is due to the common sense approach of Buddhism to every day life and the unspectacular claims it makes.

Book Description Some deep alternative current has begun flowing out of the spiritual adventures and identity struggles of recent generations. Of course, we didn't create the conditions or questions of this new age; we got caught in them. The ground shifted, the old gods departed, the economic and political utopias crumbled, and the traditional answers were washed away. We didn't leave home; home left us. How did a nice Jewish boy from Nebraska become a Buddhist in California? JoinWes "Scoop" Nisker as he takes us on a hilarious, wild ride from West to East and.

Nisker uses his own story to illuminate the Baby Boomers' roots of spiritual hunger in postwar America.

Baby boomer Buddhist Wes Nisker on the spiritual quests of his .

Baby boomer Buddhist Wes Nisker on the spiritual quests of his generation and why 'it's a great moment to be alive. He spoke with Beliefnet about his latest book, "The Big Bang, the Buddha, and the Baby Boom," now out in paperback. Your subtitle is "The Spiritual Experiments of My Generation. It's my understanding that the Baby Boom generation developed a kind of spiritual hunger, and that many of the religious institutions that we were born into didn't explain life to us in an adequate way, didn't give us the stories that conformed to what we were learning in school about the scientific revolution, really didn't give us the spiritual.

Although it is written in a very entertaining voice, when Nisker moves away from his own experience into generalizations (and broader politics) the book becomes much less interesting.

Gifts & Registry. Although it is written in a very entertaining voice, when Nisker moves away from his own experience into generalizations (and broader politics) the book becomes much less interesting. eachurch, August 4, 2013. Written by a customer while visiting librarything.

The author of Crazy Wisdom chronicles his wide-ranging search for spiritual bliss--a long, strange trip that takes him from Bob Dylan to Ram Dass and all points in between.
Reviews about Big Bang, The Buddha, and the Baby Boom: The Spiritual Experiments of My Generation (5):
Akisame
Wes Nisker, the funny man of transcendence, explains in both a personal and historic way the journey of many baby boomer seekers through the sixties and into the new millennium. Nisker was a radio d.j. in San Francisco through one of the most turbulent and consciousness raising times in American History. He provides a first person insight into the mindset of young Americans as they found peace and love, protested against the Viet Nam War, and experienced mind expansion both through chemical and spiritual vehicles. He examines the shift of that mindset in the materialistic push of the eighties and nineties. Finally he takes a look at how American Seekers now are exploring and investigating Eastern Philosophies in the new millennium. I enjoyed this book very much. However it was much more serious that I had anticipated. I expected a lot more belly-laughs having heard Nisker speak in the past.
Der Bat
Wes Nisker has here presented a rather light-hearted account of his own spiritual journey into Buddhism. He takes us through the Beat, Hippie, and New Age movements to the present, more mature, spiritual association with Eastern philosophy and Buddhism in particular. While not a deep book, it does give some insight into the history of the Buddhist movement in the United States and why Buddhism is as popular as it is now. To a large degree this popularity is due to the common sense approach of Buddhism to every day life and the unspectacular claims it makes. It also does not require exact literal belief and is thus quite open to science. In essence we are told that there is nothing to be gained because we have the ability for enlightenment within each of us. We need only connect to that awareness within. Despite this apparent simplicity, the practice of Buddhist meditation is far from easy. It requires commitment that takes time to develop, yet is open to everyone.
I do not agree with Nisker on every detail (it would be unusual if I did). For example, I'm not sure that I would quite give the blank check he gives to the evolutionary psychologists. This is, however, a minor quibble. I don't expect him to be one with all of the scientific arguments of the day.
All in all this book is a very enjoyable read and I very much recommend it to be read if you are on an airplane as I was when I read it.
Olma
Wes "Scoop" Nisker, a self-professed Buddhist traces the spiritual history of a generation from the questioning of our parents values to living under the current George W. Bush conservative climate.
He cover the beatniks, hippies, drugs, the importance of music, the disillusionment with the sixties, the turn towards introspection and fascination with eastern philosophies, the "me" decade of the eighties and the subsequent current apathy.
This is a fine documentation of a unique generation that grew up during a time of unprecedented prosperity and had trouble figuring out what to do with it. The author is not only a witness to this process but is also a participant and shares many personal stories from each many eras. As a former disk jockey from the once very progressive San Francisco KSAN radio station, he met and interacted with key players who influenced this generation like Allen Watts. He is also honest enough to write about his own doubts, misgivings and personal confusion, which is symbolic of this generation.
In many ways this generation path, in this reviewer's opinion, was predicted by the psychology of Abraham H. Maslow who postulated a hierarchy of needs (this used to be taught in Psych. 101 courses, I wonder if it still is?). A human being is always in dynamic interaction with its environment and once basic needs such as air, water, food and shelter have been met, then new needs emerge; belonging, relationships, the need for self expression and the need to understand our relationship to the rest of the universe. It's easy to understand when your hungry and you need food, however it is not as easy to understand what you need when you seemingly have everything and yet have an underlying feeling of restlessness and dissatisfaction. Indeed, there is no universal agreement about the meaning of one of Maslow's most famous postulation, the need for "self actualization".
Scoop's book does a nice job of capturing the essence of a generation faced with dealing with questions that were mostly unprecedented, at least on a mass scale, by any previous generation. Unfortunately, it seems like the beginning of the new century is more about dwindling resources and back to the concerns of basic survival needs. The subtitle of this book could also have been, in the words of rock star-philosopher David Crosby, (It Was) " A Long Time coming, Gonna Be A Long Time Gone".
BlackHaze
This book endeavours to discuss about Buddha-nature with humour and using the author's life experiences. The author's life could be considered as colourful as he travelled to the East various times seeking for the truth, a DJ-journalist-activist, an ex-hippie who embraced the peace & loving messages. He talked candidly about science & spirituality, of how they intertwine with one another & how prophetic the Eastern philosophies are as they mentioned what's been proven or suggested by contemporary scientists thousands of years before; he questioned about the benefits of knowing the absolute truths & if they do bring any betterments to our well-beings; pondering the question of why do we feel so empty even when our standard of living is far superior than five decades ago; consumerism; George W. Bush & the world that we are living now after 9-11; suggesting USA to resign from its post as the world's superpower & back to its origin & perhaps, this world would become a better place; how the world is becoming smaller & assimmilations of various religions & beliefs; relevancy of spirituality towards saving our precious environment, & so forth. Wes writes differently from Jack Kornfield (another established author upon spirituality), who happens to be his friend as well. Overall, this is quite a enchanting book to read. As Buddha-nature, we have to sense "the" moment. Whilst this book doesn't fully convey the Buddha-nature, it does give us some insight about the ups & downs of keeping up with the practice in order to embrace this world fully. Highly recommended

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