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by Robert Earle

  • ISBN: 1591142253
  • Category: Biographies
  • Author: Robert Earle
  • Subcategory: Leaders & Notable People
  • Other formats: lrf azw docx lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Naval Institute Press (October 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 224 pages
  • FB2 size: 1497 kb
  • EPUB size: 1111 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 813
Download Nights in the Pink Motel: An American Strategist's Pursuit of Peace in Iraq fb2

led occupation of Iraq.

led occupation of Iraq.

Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 2008. Earle might have added insight

Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 2008. Many of those books attempt to amplify limited experience into policy treatises with results that, in hindsight, are unremarkable. Earle might have added insight. He worked in Iraq during the height of the insurgency, a time during which many other diplomat-authors had already left.

Robert Earle arrived in Baghdad in June, 2004 just as the Coalition Provisional Authority, Bush's contribution to Iraqi . Negroponte wanted Earle to be his thinker. His book Nights in the Pink Motel is divided into four sections

Robert Earle arrived in Baghdad in June, 2004 just as the Coalition Provisional Authority, Bush's contribution to Iraqi instability, was leaving. The result? Earle has conjured up a real-life tale that is a potent mix of political and war-zone terror, with an edgy plot, honest despair, exotic heroes, unlikely villains, surprising bores (John McCain, Hilary Clinton among them). interwoven with a style as good as that of the master mystery writers. His book Nights in the Pink Motel is divided into four sections. Three of those focus upon Earle writing strategy papers for Negroponte and . commander in Iraq General George Casey.

Robert Earle has held senior positions in the . foreign affairs and intelligence communities for twenty-five years, including serving as Ambassador Negroponte's senior adviser in Iraq and later as Counselor to the Director of National Intelligence. The recipient of the Christian A. Herter Award for outstanding contributions to American diplomacy, he is also the author of a novel, The Way Home, as well as short stories and essays. He resides in Arlington, VA.

Publisher: Naval Institute Press. Print ISBN: 9781591142256, 1591142253. The world’s eTextbook reader for students. VitalSource is the leading provider of online textbooks and course materials. More than 15 million users have used our Bookshelf platform over the past year to improve their learning experience and outcomes.

An American Strategist's Pursuit of Peace in Iraq.

It offers sound advice to . national-security planners about how to successfully prevail over global threats that they will likely encounter in years to come. In the closing pages of Nights in the Pink Motel, Earle is gloomily resigned as what former Virginia Senator John Warner characterized as the sideways drift of America’s Iraq policy plunged the country into civil war.

Robert Earle was a veteran State Department official who was in retirement writing books when he was called back into service by John Negroponte who was just appointed the . Ambassador to Iraq in the summer of 2004.

It's gotten rougher since you've been gone The pink motel The Casey group The second Casey group Democracy remains possible in Iraq but.

Nights in the pink motel : an American strategist's pursuit of peace in Iraq Robert Earle. Nights in the pink motel : an American strategist's pursuit of peace in Iraq Robert Earle.

Nights in the Pink Motel is the first historical account of the strategic process that sought to reverse the negative consequences of the U.S.-led occupation of Iraq. It offers details and insights into the Iraqi insurgency and Coalition counterinsurgency available nowhere else. This book is a sustained, comprehensive account of all the conflicting factors that have made Iraq such an intractable international crisis and offers an intriguing narrative of how the American-led Coalition returned sovereignty to Iraq in June 2004, while defending Iraq's fledgling interim government against a rising insurgency and terrorism and helping ensure the success of Iraq's first national election in January 2005.The author, Robert Earle--recruited by the first U.S. ambassador to Iraq, John Negroponte, to serve as Negroponte's strategist--documents the Coalition's uncertainty about the nature of the insurgent/terrorist enemies, whose aim is to defeat democratization in Iraq. Earle's story explores the impediments frustrating the massive, $18 billion U.S. reconstruction effort and recounts the formulation of a comprehensive counterinsurgency strategy issued by Negroponte and Multinational Force-Iraq Commanding General George Casey.The title of the book is derived from the name given to the author's dingy offices a former palace of Saddam Hussein in the Green Zone of Badgad where he wrestled with developing a startegy for peace. Upon drafting the strategy, Earle learns he must be evacuated from Iraq because of massive deep vein thrombosis in his left thigh.This narrative twist takes him from the company of senior diplomats, generals, and Iraqi politicians and places him in the medical pipeline of wounded soldiers.Upon arriving home, Earle thinks his nightmare assignment in Iraq is over, but Negroponte requests that he return to Baghdad to write a long message to the President, explaining that U.S. policy is failing and offering an alternative approach. Casey, meanwhile, also wants Earle to assess the evolution of Iraqi politics and possible outcomes of the risky January 2005 election.Returning to Iraq over the strenuous objections of State Department doctors, Earle occupies the dingy environs he calls the "Pink Motel" and completes his assignments, digging deeper into the realities of the international effort to end the violence and build the peace. Nights in the Pink Motel is a graphic, first-person account of the political, military, and human efforts to dispel the fog of 21st century warfare.The book is an essential contribution to understanding how all elements of national power must be combined to defeat insurgency and terror.
Reviews about Nights in the Pink Motel: An American Strategist's Pursuit of Peace in Iraq (4):
Weetont
Hundreds of U.S. diplomats and officials have served in Iraq, and scores have written books about their experience. Many of those books attempt to amplify limited experience into policy treatises with results that, in hindsight, are unremarkable. To these, add Earle's account of his own time as a senior aid to John Negroponte, whose 2004-05 tenure as ambassador to Iraq following the departure of Coalition Provisional Authority director L. Paul Bremer is now largely forgotten.

Earle might have added insight. He worked in Iraq during the height of the insurgency, a time during which many other diplomat-authors had already left. Instead, Nights in the Pink Motel--the title itself a cutesy name for the Green Zone--is full of inane anecdotes and irrelevant details that reflect less the nature of Iraq and more the culture shock of a pampered diplomat inserted into a military environment who focuses on such details as signs proclaiming, "No long guns in the dining facility." He conveys conversations in almost cartoonish terms. Former speaker of the House Newt Gingrich "barks," and Maj.-Gen. Michael Streeter "moans." There is little insight into Negroponte's interactions with Gen. George Casey, the senior military officer in Iraq, nor how Negroponte and Earle decided which Iraqi politicians to meet and which to shun, nor how U.S. officials sought to maximize their own influence at the expense of U.S. adversaries.

Earle's narrative conveys little evidence of serious planning or policymaking. His meetings convey little more sophistication than descriptions of Negroponte constructing bullet point lists during staff meetings. Perhaps Earle wishes to suggest his predecessors could not understand the obvious, but instead he highlights the lack of insight into the nuance of Iraqi politics with which Negroponte, Earle, and his team arrived, treating Iraq as a blank slate and discarding the hard-earned lessons of past experience.

Ultimately, Nights in the Pink Motel fails completely. To contrast Earle's account with that of Peter Mansoor is to juxtapose an elementary school student's understanding of Iraqi politics and the insurgency with that of a university professor. In many ways, Iraq's occupation, the insurgency, and reconstruction are tales of woe. Many books might elucidate decision-making and embarrass U.S. policymakers. Nights in the Pink Motel will embarrass only its author.

Michael Rubin
Middle East Quarterly
Spring 2009
Sti
Robert Earle was a retired American diplomat, writing novels that -- to judge by the prose in "Nights in the Pink Motel" -- were unreadable when opportunity knocked. He could go to Iraq, a place he knew nothing about, as the "thinker" for John Negroponte, who was being sent as ambassador in 2004 to pick up the pieces from the Coalition Provisional Authority disaster.
According to this memoir, Earle many times wondered what he was doing in Iraq. Me, too.
First off, he was a poor choice to think about strategy, since he doesn't know the difference between strategy and tactics. Second, he didn't know anything about the area. Third, cooped up in the strategic -- or in this case, tactical -- hamlet called the Green Zone, he had no opportunity to find out.
It paid well.
All memoirs of the disaster in Iraq are worth reading for their instructive value. Few are as hard to read as "Nights in the Pink Motel." Once you get going, however, there is a certain fascination with a man capable of writing, apropos of watching a hospital patient taking a smoke break, "Smoking is almost job-like, a bit of imperative fire-tending, full of inchoate, ineffable meanings." Can a writer capable of a line that bad do even worse? Press on. Yes, he can!
Strategic thinking -- given George Bush's desire to cultivate democracy among Mideast Muslims -- would have begun with a question, are there any Muslims who might be willing to make the compromises necessary to create a functioning democracy? The answer, obviously, is, only the Kurds. The next step would not have required a hired "thinker." Support a free and independent Great Kurdistan for starters.
Strategy, however, was not on the table. Negroponte was expected only to devise a tactical retreat sufficient to stop the bleeding, real and metaphorical. As we know, he failed.
Earle gives no hints about what his boss may have thought himself, but Earle's contempt for Bush shines through every time the president is mentioned.
His feelings about Iraqis are obscure. He hardly ever talked to any.
Astoundingly, he manages to write a whole book about politics in the Middle East without considering Islam, other than as a help to label various factions who are treated politically, not religiously, which is, of course, the opposite of how they view themselves.
Occasionally a gem of insight drops on the floor. Out of the blue he mentions that the Axis of Weasel back in the White House and Department of Defense was deeply suspicious of the Shia. You would think this insight -- obviously correct -- would lead a professional thinker to think, what in the world were they up to, if they won't support the Kurds, slapped down
the Sunni and don't trust the Shia? What clients did they think would people their client-state?
The question is not asked. Not in "Nights in the Pink Hotel," anyway.
After some time, Earle makes contact with a lawyer, identified only as Kay, who wants the United States government to make a priority of establishing a complete rule of law in Iraq, instead of, as she complains, being interested only in prosecuting wrongdoers. Earle adopts Kay's program, which gives a direction to an otherwise aimless tale.
Another failure, of course.
So after a year, he goes home. The final few pages, in which Earle visits wounded GIs, are tender and moving. They are so different from the rest of the book, you wonder whether Earle wrote them.
Nobody in this book visits any wounded Iraqis.

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