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by Calvin L. Christman,Susan Johnson Hadler

  • ISBN: 1574410334
  • Category: Biographies
  • Author: Calvin L. Christman,Susan Johnson Hadler
  • Subcategory: Leaders & Notable People
  • Other formats: lrf txt docx lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of North Texas Press; 1st edition (January 1, 1998)
  • Pages: 241 pages
  • FB2 size: 1886 kb
  • EPUB size: 1159 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 592
Download Lost in the Victory: Reflections of American War Orphans of World War II fb2

With Susan Hadler, a psychologist and war orphan herself, Mix conducted interviews of these war orphans . As a collection of essays and interviews of American World War Two orphans, LOST IN THE VICTORY paints a broad and intense picture of a narrow and lonely subject.

One of the most striking things about these narratives is the conspiracy of silence. Most told of growing up feeling ashamed and embarrassed that they had no father. With each chapter, the sense of loss grows; not just the loss of a fine American to battle, but the loss of a child's identity.

The voices in this book belong to sons and daughters who for half a century have seldom spoken of their fathers or of their own lives after the deaths of their fathers. Memories revealed through interviews, letters, family histories and remembrances are remarkable for their honesty and quiet courage. Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles.

Ann Bennett Mix, founder and director of the American WWII Orphans Network in Bellingham, Washington, is the author of Touchstones: A Guide to Records, Rights, and Resources for the Next of Kin of American World War II Casualties. Библиографические данные.

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Lost in the Victory book. Herein are recollections of war orphans of World War II, sons and daughters who for half a century have seldom spoken of their fathers or of their own lives after the deaths of their fathers. The memories revealed through interviews, letters, family histories and remembrances of their fathers’ war buddies are remarkable for their honesty and their quiet courage.

War orphan Susan Johnson Hadler, a psychologist, began a collaboration with Ann to collect the stories of the orphans when she discovered there were no statistics on the number of children and no studies on the effects of their fathers’ deaths on their lives. Records which could have helped sociologists, psychologists, and historians were simply nonexistent. Mix and Hadler began to interview war orphans, who nearly all reported having felt the awkwardness with which America treated the subject of their fathers

Elite OSPREY PUBLISHING African American Troops in World War II A L E X A N D E R M. BIELAKOWSKI is a former .

Elite OSPREY PUBLISHING African American Troops in World War II A L E X A N D E R M. BIELAKOWSKI is a former US Army. Deceptions of World War II. ffirs. qxd 12/10/01 8:51 AM Page iii Deceptions of World War II William B. Breuer John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Fighters of World War I. .

In 1991, Mix founded the American World War II Orphans Network (AWON), an organization . The bulk of Lost in the Victory is a compilation of letters, reminiscences, and interviews with World War II orphans collected by AWON.

The bulk of Lost in the Victory is a compilation of letters, reminiscences, and interviews with World War II orphans collected by AWON. Several consistent themes emerge from the stories. For example, orphaned children grew up witnessing the pain their mothers felt in having lost a husband and in raising children on their own.

Herein are recollections of war orphans of World War II, sons and daughters who for half a century have seldom spoken of their fathers or of their own lives after the deaths of their fathers. The memories revealed through interviews, letters, family histories and remembrances of their fathers’ war buddies are remarkable for their honesty and their quiet courage.
Reviews about Lost in the Victory: Reflections of American War Orphans of World War II (7):
Valawye
As a person born in 1946 after the actually "Great War", life moved forward at full gallop into the 50s and life-altering 60s. We, the baby boomers, were marked by the war which none of us ever talked about. Reading this, I find myself asking how many of my classmates lost a father, brother, uncle, cousin in the European or Pacific theatre of war. They were called heroes, but out history books barely covered the complexities of the costliest war in terms of human life ever conducted. Considering WWII, we have an almost knee-jerk reaction of the Holocaust- industrialized extermination of the Jews. But, we were left blissfully ignorant by universal silence about the scope of the war we're still watching unfold in aftermath across the globe - most recently in Ukraine. This is the often ignored and mostly untold impact on our own children coming of age in the age of personal loss endured largely in silence.
Xirmiu
Very well-written stories of the impact of war on the widows and orphans of those who were killed in action. Hopefully the orphans of recent wars fare better than those of us from WWII who were told practically nothing about our Fathers and are only now, 70 years later, beginning to get to know our brave Dads. Thank you, Susan Hadler and Anne Mix for a wonderful account.
SupperDom
A fabulous book of personal memories, joys, and sorrows of children who lost fathers inWWII. I could identify since my precious Papa was killed at sea.
Arlana
Excellent book
Vozuru
As one who lost my father in WWII, this was a difficult book to read because it triggered a flood of emotions that had been suppressed for many years. It should be required reading for all military officers and world leaders. Those of us labeled war babies or war orphans will be forever grateful to Ann Mix for bringing us together and our stories to light.
Vudogal
So few members of my generation, born in the 1960's, have been introduced to the full depth of a war's reach. Often our understanding is derived generally from the broadest high school or college survey class; or worse, Hollywood. So it is quite sobering that a member of the "me" generation receives the sharpest of slaps across the face.
As a collection of essays and interviews of American World War Two orphans, LOST IN THE VICTORY paints a broad and intense picture of a narrow and lonely subject. With each chapter, the sense of loss grows; not just the loss of a fine American to battle, but the loss of a child's identity.

However, the range of emotions is broad. While sad and desperate at times, the book also brims with pride and faith.

For a Memorial Day tribute, there could be no better slap of reality than LOST IN THE VICTORY.
Tinavio
A well documented reminder of how families that lose a parent in a war are permanently affected.

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