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by David E. Fisher

  • ISBN: 1593760477
  • Category: Biographies
  • Author: David E. Fisher
  • Subcategory: Historical
  • Other formats: txt mbr lit lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Counterpoint; 1st edition (October 20, 2005)
  • Pages: 304 pages
  • FB2 size: 1364 kb
  • EPUB size: 1688 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 315
Download A Summer Bright and Terrible: Winston Churchill, Lord Dowding, Radar, and the Impossible Triumph of the Battle of Britain fb2

David Fisher's Book "A Summer Bright and Terrible . How can a summer be bright and terrible? Fisher writes convincingly that the long, dry, summer of 1940 over England offered the world a turning point, the Battle of Britain.

David Fisher's Book "A Summer Bright and Terrible. celebrates the 1940 "Battle of Britain" in which the RAF out-classed the German Air Force. Luftwaffe) Unfortunately this book contains an inexcusable factual error on Pages 137-138, which damages the book's credibility: "On July 4, the Luftwaffe attacked a for the first time in force. At 8:41 that morning, thirty-three Stukas suddenly dropped out of the clouds to hit the Portsmouth naval base.

A Summer Bright and Terrible book. Lord Hugh Dowding, Air Chief Marshall of the Royal Air Force, Head of Fighter Command, First Baron of Bentley Priory, lived in the grip of unseen spirits. Lord Hugh Dowding, Air Chief Marshall of the Royal Air. In thrall of the supernatural, he talked to the ghosts of his dead pilots, proclaimed that Hitler was defeated only by the personal intervention of God, and believed in the existence of faeries. How could it be that such Lord Hugh Dowding, Air Chief Marshall of the Royal Air Force, Head of Fighter Command, First Baron of Bentley Priory, lived in the grip of unseen spirits.

A Summer Bright and Terrible. A Summer Bright and Terrible. little business with the Jews. And you couldnt really blame them for that, he whispered. Winston Churchill, Lord Dowding, Radar, and the Impossible Triumph of the Battle of Britain.

Przeczytaj go w aplikacji Książki Google Play na komputerze albo na urządzeniu z Androidem lub iOS. Pobierz, by czytać offline. And he insisted that his scientists investigate the mysterious invisible rays that would prove to be the salvation of Britain: radar.

Winston Churchill (1874- 1965) was the elder son of Lord Randolph Churchill and his American wife, Jennie . Winston Churchill began to write the first of what were to be the six volumes of The Second World War in 1946

Winston Churchill (1874- 1965) was the elder son of Lord Randolph Churchill and his American wife, Jennie Jerome. Winston Churchill began to write the first of what were to be the six volumes of The Second World War in 1946. It was a work he had expected to postpone to a later stage of his life, since he had looked forward in 1945 to extending his wartime leadership into the peace. The rejection of his party by the electorate was a heavy blow, which might have dulled his urge to write.

About book: Horribly written book about an important piece of history. The author goes out of his way to single out one man as being responsible for winning the Battle of Britain, but he makes sure that he trashes some parts of Lord Dowding's personality that don't fit the author's world-view (Dowding's odd spiritualism, his weird, but unshakeable belief in God being on Britain's side, et.

Winston Churchill, Lord Dowding, Radar, and the Impossible Triumph of the Battle of Britain. Lord Hugh Dowding, Air Chief Marshall of the Royal Air Force, Head of Fighter Command, First Baron of Bentley Priory, lived in the grip of unseen spirits

Winston Churchill, Lord Dowding, Radar, and the Impossible Triumph of the Battle of Britain. Publisher: Counterpoint. How could it be that such a man should be put in charge of evaluating technical developments for the British air ministry? Yet it was he who brought the modern multi-gunned fighter into existence.

Lord Hugh Dowding, Air Chief Marshall of the Royal Air Force, Head of Fighter Command, First Baron of Bentley Priory, lived in the grip of unseen spirits. In thrall of the supernatural world, he talked to the ghosts of his dead pilots, proclaimed that Hitler was defeated only by the personal intervention of God, and believed in the existence of fairies. How could it be that such a man should be put in charge of evaluating technical developments for the British air ministry? Yet it was he, fighting the inertia of the bureaucrats who ruled the Air Force, who brought the modern multi-gunned fighter into existence. And he insisted that his scientists investigate the mysterious invisible rays that would prove to be the salvation of Britain: radar.Dowding, who provided the organization and training that led to victory, has been all but ignored by U. S. biographers of Churchill and historians of the Battle of Britain. Yet his story is vital, both for its importance to the defense of Britain-indeed the entire free world—and for the intriguing character study that emerges from his ongoing conflict with Churchill and the British government during the crisis years of the empire.
Reviews about A Summer Bright and Terrible: Winston Churchill, Lord Dowding, Radar, and the Impossible Triumph of the Battle of Britain (7):
Kale
David Fisher's Book "A Summer Bright and Terrible...." celebrates the 1940 "Battle of Britain" in which the RAF out-classed the German Air Force.(Luftwaffe)
Unfortunately this book contains an inexcusable factual error on Pages 137-138, which damages the book's credibility:
"On July 4, the Luftwaffe attacked a for the first time in force. At 8:41 that morning, thirty-three Stukas suddenly dropped out of the clouds to hit the Portsmouth naval base. Although radar had picked them up, it had not done so soon enough. What’s more, because the aerodrome Dowding had fought for in this sector wasn’t yet completed, the Hurricanes were still miles away when the bombs began dropping. In four minutes a merchant tanker and an antiaircraft ship were left burning and sinking, and the Stukas had disappeared. One of them was shot down by antiaircraft fire, but the British fighters arrived on the scene too late."

This air-attack was not on "Portsmouth". It was on Portland, in Dorset, and is immortalized in London's Imperial War Museum with a dramatic painting of the attack, and on the Tombstone in Portland Naval Cemetery of Leading Seaman Jack Mantle who won the first home-waters V.C. while defending the anti-aircraft ship H.M.S. Foylebank.

This attack should also have been listed as the beginning of The Battle of Britain. The Official German history of the Battle of Britain: "Kanalkampf", does date this Battle as beginning on July 4th, 1940.
Dogrel
An excellent account of the Battle of Britain, and the one person most responsible for the strategy which proved to be successful, pushing for radar research, radar towers, concrete runways for his fighter planes, allowing them to fly rather than be grounded due to soggy grass fields, preventing a bigger flow of airplanes to France, a lost cause are just some of his ideas. We don't hear enough about Dowding this book will give readers a great understanding of this remarkable man.
Haal
How can a summer be bright and terrible? Fisher writes convincingly that the long, dry, summer of 1940 over England offered the world a turning point, the Battle of Britain. The star was Hugh "Stuffy" Dowding, the aging officer responsible for the fighter defense of England. Faced with the assumption that fighters were too slow, too under armed, and too late - "the bomber will always get through" - and faced with an overwhelming enemy, Dowding had to Marshall has scarce "chicks", lull Hermann Goring into believing that England had no resistance left, and postpone Operation Sea Lion. This bright, terrible summer provided the backdrop for this well-documented battle. Fisher offers four parts - winter, spring, summer and fall - to create a complete context for this fascinating historical story.

The strategy was to fight strategically, with a few well-positioned squadrons taking on waves of German bombers and fighters. The "secret" to the success was the intricate defense communications system, based on nascent radar, a system that provided enough time for fighters to rise up to meet the Huns. Even at the time, Dowding's plan was not universally accepted. Even his success in turning the tide and postponing the inevitable invasion did not save him his job. Other people clamored for more credit, including Winston Churchill, rankled peers, a disgruntled scientist, and the legless fighter pilot, Douglas Bader. "Bomber" Harris and the "big wing" theory may have earned more press, but Fisher makes his point clearly, if personally and even conversationally, that Dowding saved the day, on stubborn spunk and science. Dowding leveraged his experience in the first Great War to manage a career based on science more than diplomacy or tact. He was loved by the men he led, and reviled by many of the peers he challenged.

Fisher even forgives Neville Chamberlain's aligned "appeasement" as a method for England to buy time in the run up to full-scale war. Clearly England was not yet equipped to defend itself at the time of Munich, but it is hard to know if Hitler would have been ready to go. Fisher is a scientist, a professor of cosmochemistry, who teaches about war and science, and he has a skill at putting together the scientific and technological advances that saved England as well as those half-baked ideas that fortunately did not stop radar and Dowding's communication system from stopping the onslaught. Fisher has a light, pleasant, non-technical writing style. The reader feels as if Fisher is telling a story, perhaps to a classroom of students. He details Dowding's life, including Dowding's fascination with spirit life, séances, and mediums. Fisher takes on some of the conventional wisdom as to heroes and chumps and leaves the reader satisfied with a thorough, personal story, even with Fisher's self-admitted bias about some incidents and people.

The final flare of the Battle of Britain, the second week in September 1940, when Hitler finally had to acknowledge that the invasion was off, provides a fitting climax to a climactic story. This is interesting history, enjoyable, educational and informative, vivid yet not graphic, personal, candid, and willing to look at both sides of the numerous accounts of this period. Having read many of them myself, I recommend this one as a satisfying experience.
dermeco
Very well written. Not as much technical detail as "The Most Dangerous Enemy" and some other books on the subject I've read, but a very good biography of Hugh Dowding, and the importance of his leadership in preparing the RAF for World War II, and managing Fighter Command's operations during the critical days of the battle.
Tygokasa
Lord Dowding was in my opinion one of the handful of people responsible for the allies winning the Second World War. While he is generally considered the individual largely responsible for winning the Battle of Britain, it is rarely shown just what he had to go through to do so. Mr. Fisher has done an excellent job in talking about Dowding.

After winning the battle he was forceably retired, and his efforts largely ignored by the 'official' press. The story of the battle of Britain written by the RAF doesn't mention him, Churchill's great series on the Second World War says little. And reading between the lines on this book you get the impression that he must have been a rough SOB to have working for you. Working under him might have been OK but he seemed to have little to recommend him to the bosses. After all he called his pilots his 'chicks."

After the war, Kesselring was asked what was the most important battle that Germany lost. He replied "The Battle of Britain." When your enemy's general answers like that, you can pretty well assume it is true. Germany lost so many planes over Britain and the Channel that they started the Russian invasion with fewer planes than they had when they started the battle for France.

And if we hadn't had Britain to serve as a staging area, D-Day would have been impossible.
Andronrad
Interesting story of how Dowding was so instrumental in getting Britain able to face the German onslaught. Also a disturbing
picture of how top level squabbling was allowed to weaken the overall effort at the cost of hundreds of lives.

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