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by W. Bruce Lincoln

  • ISBN: 0385279086
  • Category: Biographies
  • Author: W. Bruce Lincoln
  • Subcategory: Historical
  • Other formats: txt mobi docx azw
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Anchor; 1st edition (August 5, 1983)
  • Pages: 864 pages
  • FB2 size: 1603 kb
  • EPUB size: 1934 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 817
Download The Romanovs: Autocrats of All the Russias fb2

Attention reader: this is an uncorrected galley proof

Attention reader: this is an uncorrected galley proof. It is not a finished book and is not expected to look like one. Errors in spelling, page length, format et. all will be corrected when the book is published several months from no. .Includes bibliographical references (p. 849-951).

The Romanovs: Autocrats .has been added to your Cart. Noted Russian scholar W. Bruce Lincoln has brilliantly portrayed the achievement, significance and high drama of the Dynasty as no previous book has done

The Romanovs: Autocrats . Bruce Lincoln has brilliantly portrayed the achievement, significance and high drama of the Dynasty as no previous book has done. His use of rare archival materials has allowed him to present a portrait of the Romanovs based on their own writings and those of the men and women who knew them. From the Inside Flap. Its reign ended with the execution of Nicholas II and Alexandra in the early 20th century.

William Bruce Lincoln (September 6, 1938 – April 9, 2000) was an American scholar and author who wrote a number of widely-read books on Russian history. An expert noted for his narrative skills, he explained that he began "to write for a broader audience in the hope that my efforts to explain Russia's past may enable readers to better understand Russia's present.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Romanovs: Autocrats of All the Russias as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Bruce Lincoln, professor of Russian history at Northern Illinois University, was an acclaimed Russian scholar and the author of Nicholas I, The Romanovs, In War's Dark Shadow, Passage Through Armageddon, Red Victory, and Sunlight at Midnight.

Fue autor de obras como Nikolai Miliutin: An Enlightened Russian Bureaucrat of the 19th Century (1977), Nicholas I: Emperor and Autocrat of All the Russias (1978), sobre el zar Nicolás I de Rusia, The Romanovs: Autocrats of All the Russias (1981), In the Vanguard of Reform: Russia's Enlightened Bureaucrats 1825-1861.

Noted Russian scholar W. Bruce Lincoln has brilliantly portrayed the achievement, significance and high drama of the Dynasty as no previous book has done

Noted Russian scholar W. ISBN:978-0-385-27908-6. Издательство: "Random House, In. ISBN: 978-0-385-27908-6. Nicholas I: Emperor and Autocrat of All the Russias. Читать дальш. мотрите также. Lincoln Bruce - все книги автора.

Its reign ended with the execution of Nicholas II and Alexandra in the early

Its reign ended with the execution of Nicholas II and Alexandra in the early. The Romanovs: Autocrats of All the Russias. com: The Romanovs: Autocrats of All the Russias (9780385279086): W. Bruce Lincoln: Books. Thing 1 Historical Artifacts Reign World History Black And White Pictures Lincoln Tsar Nicholas Ii Reading Lists Russia.

For three centuries--beginning with the accession of Mikhail Feodorovich Romanov in 1613--the Romanov Dynasty ruled Russia.  Its reign ended with the execution of Nicholas II and Alexandra in the early 20th century.  Noted Russian scholar W. Bruce Lincoln has brilliantly portrayed the achievement, significance and high drama of the Dynasty as no previous book has done.  His use of rare archival materials has allowed him to present a portrait of the Romanovs based on their own writings and those of the men and women who knew them.
Reviews about The Romanovs: Autocrats of All the Russias (7):
Anayanis
W. Bruce Lincoln's history of the 300 years of Romanov rule in Russia (1613-1917) is easily his most readable account of Russian history. While Professor Lincoln's research is meticulous as ever, in this volume he has to cover far more ground than in his other more focused histories and thus he avoids some of the digressions that he normally might allow himself. The result is a superb one-volume history of the Tsars and Tsarinas who determined Russia's development from a minor principality into the largest empire on earth.
The Romanovs consists of four parts: Muscovite beginnings (1613-1689), the Rise of an Empire (1689-1796), Empire Triumphant (1796-1894) and the Last Emperor (1894-1917). The first three parts each consist of several chapters, with the first covering biographical details of the Tsars and Tsarinas in that period, followed by chapters on political and cultural changes in that period. There are only two significant problems with what is otherwise a superb presentation: a non-chronological methodology and a lack of a single supporting map of Romanov domains (there are two maps of St Petersburg's layout). In the first case, Lincoln tends to keep coming back to Tsars in subsequent chapters on culture, politics, etc which is very confusing. Indeed, he seems in a rush to plow through the biographies of the Tsars, then revisit their cultural accomplishments, then come back again and discuss their political accomplishments, and then maybe discuss a few scandals or wars. As for the lack of maps, it makes it extremely difficult for the reader to evaluate the territorial expansions of the various Romanov rulers or Russia's growth over three centuries.
Despite these two flaws, the Romanovs is a delightful read for anyone with a scholarly interest in Russian imperial history. Perhaps the three most significant rulers that Lincoln assesses are Peter the Great, Catherine the Great and Nicholas II. Most histories tend to elevate Peter to hero status, but Lincoln's evaluation is more mixed. While Peter gets great credit for pushing Russia to modernize, the costs he incurred may have been too great. In particular, Lincoln questions Peter's obsession with building his capital on totally unsuitable terrain; the fact that the Russians were able to eventually succeed in constructing Peter's dream capital often disguises the fact that the human and financial losses were exorbitantly wasteful. The reader will be left to ponder the question that if Peter had built his capital elsewhere, Russia's development might have been much less painful. As for Catherine, Lincoln prefers to minimize the scandal and corruption associated with her court and view this as the golden age of Russian cultural development. Finally, Nicholas II appears as even more of a fatalistic dolt bent on self-destruction than he did in Lincoln's previous books. In sum, The Romanovs provides a solid and very readable account of Russia's development under the Tsars and Tsarinas.
Anazan
This is a good, comprehensive history. It does seem to bounce around a bit and it is very long. I bought it as background for a trip soon to Russia (Moscow to St Petersburg). Give yourself lots of time to read this one but it is worth your time.
santa
This is another great book dealing with Pre Bolshevic Revolution Russian Empire and on the Great Estates of Russia and the work force of 'Their' Peasants. This tells of plans to slowly lift these people from their current state of being but the Communists took All of that hope away leaving in it's stead ignorance, fear and servitude that was much harder than anything their pre revolutionary lives had been like. This book came packaged very well and received in just a few days, I recommend this company
Jozrone
Bruce Lincoln's study of the Romanovss is excellent. It is fast paced and well written. Lincoln takes each century and/or period and covers it in cronology and then is certain areas such as culture, foreign policy, domestic affairs, etc. I have read Crankshaw's book, "In the Shadow of the Winter Palace," and need to go back and read it again for comparison. I will be reading Lindsey Hughe's book on the Romanovs after this as more than one interpretation is essential to truly understand any period of history. Since written history is an interpretation of the facts, more than one viewpoint is essential.
I am sorry that Lincoln's book does not have additional information on the plight of the serfs and the crueily towards the Jews over the period of the Romanovs. It doesn't detract from the value but would have been helpful. I am also sorry that he didn't spend time on Catherine II's encouragement of German settlement as it would have been helpful in understanding the Russian-Germans emigrating to America in the 19th Century.
Lincoln, along with others makes a case for the "ture" Romanov line ending with Empress Elizabeth. He does make a point of Catherine having a son, Paul I who was a short lived Empreor by her first lover, thus ending the Romanov blood line. But that's yet another story and VERY controversial.
Oversall, an outstanding book.
Nikobar
Mr. Lincolm, unlike Robert Massie who wrote "Peter the Great," left me with the clear impression that he understood the source material he had at hand, and was able to verify through corroboration every thing he said. Some of the more incredible stories, or speculative rumors are left out. This does not make his work any less enjoyable, but it does lend Mr. Lincoln's work a feeling of solid thoroughness in its research--something that is lacking in Massie's book. If a story was left out, I felt quite confident that Mr. Lincoln knew of the story, but could not corroborate it to his satisfaction.
This book is very thorough and incredible in its vast sweep. But it is broken apart into major periods. Each period is further broken down into topics, such as political history, economic history, social history, and so on. This format makes the book quite useful as a reference as well as enjoyable to read. This is the best book on the story of the Romanov family in the English language to date. And I can see this book firmly establishing itself as a timeless classic, alongside Shelby Foote's "Civil War," or Gibbons, "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire."
Kerahuginn
I would give this book more than 5 stars if it were possible! Very easy to read and keeps you so interested. Very well written!
TheMoonix
Read almost the entire thing in my Russian History class. If you're interested in learning the history of the Romanovs, YOU NEED TO BUY IT. It is fantastic.

This is coming from someone who has nothing to do with Russian studies and just took the class because she loves learning random things.
Really well done! Written like an epic novel.

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