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by Max Hastings

  • ISBN: 030726839X
  • Category: Biographies
  • Author: Max Hastings
  • Subcategory: Historical
  • Other formats: txt rtf lit lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Knopf; First Edition edition (April 27, 2010)
  • Pages: 576 pages
  • FB2 size: 1857 kb
  • EPUB size: 1931 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 965
Download Winston's War: Churchill, 1940-1945 fb2

This book moves along very quickly and will be thoroughly enjoyed by anyone interested in Winston Churchill or WWII. The footnotes and resources listed are voluminous and the maps, the few that are included, are excellent. Of course, we must admit there are many books on WWII and on Mr. Churchill; however, I think Mr. Hastings has added something to the previous story.

ALSO BY MAX HASTINGS REPORTAGE America 1968: The Fire This Time Ulster 1969: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Northern Ireland The Battle for the Falklands (with Simon Jenkins). Winstons war churchill . .Winston's War: Churchill, 1940-1945, . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63. 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75. Also by max hastings. America 1968: The Fire This Time.

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Winston's War: Churchill, 1940-1945. 712 Pages · 2010 · . 8 MB · 134 Downloads ·English. Pretending to not be afraid is as good as actually not being afraid. How To Stop Worrying And Start Living. 01 MB·112,673 Downloads. the captain standing on the bridge, could press a button and-presto! to live with 'day-tight compartments' as the most.

Winston Churchill and the Second Front. 1940–1943, Oxford University Press, 1957. Churchill Goes to War: Winston’s Wartime Journeys. Churchill and the Politics of War, 1940–41.

Max Hastings shows that, as a military leader, Winston Churchill showed brilliance early in the war, then fallibility. For much of Winston Churchill’s life before 1940, the defects had seemed to many people a good deal more evident than the qualities. His career saw triumph interspersed with disaster; he held at one time or another (as his ill-chosen friend Lord Beaverbrook said with only a little exaggeration) every opinion on every subject; he acquired a reputation both for shameless opportunism and for impetuous lack of judgment.

A vivid and incisive portrait of Winston Churchill during wartime from acclaimed historian Max Hastings, Winston’s War captures .

A vivid and incisive portrait of Winston Churchill during wartime from acclaimed historian Max Hastings, Winston’s War captures the full range of Churchill’s endlessly fascinating character. At once brilliant and infuriating, self-important and courageous, Hastings’s Churchill comes brashly to life as never before

ISBN 978-0-00-726367-7 (re-titled Winston's War: Churchill, 1940–1945 for US release by Knopf, 2010, ISBN 978-0-307-26839-6)

Max Hastings at the Financial Times 125th Anniversary Party, London, in June 2013. Max Hugh Macdonald Hastings. 1945-12-28) 28 December 1945 (age 74). Lambeth, London, England. He is also the author of numerous books, chiefly on defence matters, which have won several major awards. ISBN 978-0-00-726367-7 (re-titled Winston's War: Churchill, 1940–1945 for US release by Knopf, 2010, ISBN 978-0-307-26839-6). Did You Really Shoot the Television?

Автор: Hastings Max Sir Название: Winston& War: Churchill, 1940-1945 Издательство: Random House (USA) . A book which shows the impact of war upon hundreds of millions of people around the world- soldiers, sailors and airmen; housewives, farm workers and children.

A book which shows the impact of war upon hundreds of millions of people around the world- soldiers, sailors and airmen; housewives, farm workers and children.

A vivid and incisive portrait of Winston Churchill during wartime from acclaimed historian Max Hastings, Winston’s War captures the full range of Churchill’s endlessly fascinating character. At once brilliant and infuriating, self-important and courageous, Hastings’s Churchill comes brashly to life as never before. Beginning in 1940, when popular demand elevated Churchill to the role of prime minister, and concluding with the end of the war, Hastings shows us Churchill at his most intrepid and essential, when, by sheer force of will, he kept Britain from collapsing in the face of what looked like certain defeat. Later, we see his significance ebb as the United States enters the war and the Soviets turn the tide on the Eastern Front. But Churchill, Hastings reminds us, knew as well as anyone that the war would be dominated by others, and he managed his relationships with the other Allied leaders strategically, so as to maintain Britain’s influence and limit Stalin’s gains. At the same time, Churchill faced political peril at home, a situation for which he himself was largely to blame. Hastings shows how Churchill nearly squandered the miraculous escape of the British troops at Dunkirk and failed to address fundamental flaws in the British Army. His tactical inaptitude and departmental meddling won him few friends in the military, and by 1942, many were calling for him to cede operational control. Nevertheless, Churchill managed to exude a public confidence that brought the nation through the bitter war. Hastings rejects the traditional Churchill hagiography while still managing to capture what he calls Churchill’s “appetite for the fray.” Certain to be a classic, Winston’s War is a riveting profile of one of the greatest leaders of the twentieth century.
Reviews about Winston's War: Churchill, 1940-1945 (7):
Cordanara
I do not know of a more insightful, eloquent historian and now biographer than Max Hastings. One goes away knowing that wars are fought by soldiers but made, for evil or good, by leaders. And Hastings shows us that the greatest of them may have been the most recent. Aside from just Churchill we get wonderful epigrams. Here are only a few from Hasting’s rich narrative:

“[Britain was] a nation which in those days clung to its radio receivers as storm-bound sailors once lashed themselves to the masts of their ships.”

“The views of the British and American governments were distorted by logic.”

“The narrative of the Second World War presented by most historians is distorted by the fact that it focuses upon what happened, rather than what did not.”

I need this!

And I seek out any history narrated by Robin Sachs. This fine actor, who died too soon, lends his skills to storytelling. I think the best storytelling in English is by the English. Sachs has a clear, resonant baritone and a fluidity of phrasing that is at once restful and engaging. A consolation for losing Robin is that he will live on by making great history live.
Malara
Winston’s War, Churchill, 1940 – 1945 by Max Hastings, is a masterful review of the times and the man. Mr. Hastings is an engaging writer easily mixing rather cold facts with pointed stories to keep the reader interested. This book moves along very quickly and will be thoroughly enjoyed by anyone interested in Winston Churchill or WWII. The footnotes and resources listed are voluminous and the maps, the few that are included, are excellent.

Of course, we must admit there are many books on WWII and on Mr. Churchill; however, I think Mr. Hastings has added something to the previous story. The author obviously holds Mr. Churchill in notable esteem and contends he towered above other figures that held the stage of history with him. The war was his finest hour. What is new is Max Hastings clearly sees the flaws in the man and his country. Mr. Hastings has an incredible ability to boil down the essence of what was going on in the war and then accurately relate those events to the leaders. He unerringly describes how the leaders of the US, UK, and USSR mixed together and how that mix impacted the decisions of that age.

Mr. Hastings recognizes the irony of going to war to keep the Nazi’s out of Poland and then watching them fall under a greater evil in Stalin’s communist. He records Churchill’s despairing struggle to prevent it.

Winston’s War poignantly points out how Churchill, with his back against the wall, managed to weld the nation together long enough to pull it through the worst times in 1940 only to watch it gradually fall apart as the war progressed to a victorious conclusion. He was the man for the hour, but he was not the man for all hours. Winston Churchill was a 19th century man, and could not lead a 20th century nation into the future. Churchill saw it was a future of socialism, which he rejected, but could not come up with the means to fight. At least the future he secured for the UK was not one of rule by a foreign tyranny.

The author is able to balance, better than other authors on Churchill I have read, the legitimate criticisms of the man with the reality of his accomplishments. Comparing the good to the bad in a fair and responsible way is not easy, not in the least; however, Mr. Max Hastings does it as well as any man could.

Mr. Hasting’s insights on WWII are worth the price of the book all by themselves. He understands the power of the German Army and identifies them as the best army in the field during WWII. The author perceptively points out a few German divisions gave the allies fits in Africa and Italy and affirms that without the Soviet Union England and the US could not have defeated Hitler. Mr. Hastings peppers his writings with these blunt insights which helps us understand the decisions of the time better than most books which relate the arguments but not the unvarnished truth that was being confronted.

An excellent and nearly flawless book.

AD2
Damdyagab
Decades following his death, Winston S. Churchill (WSC) continues to fascinate historians and attract various pundits hoping to make a critical imprint on the landscape of modern moral relativism. His detractors attempt to belittle his many accomplishments by framing them in the context of his many inconsistencies and, failing that, sometimes resort to ad hominem attacks ("alcoholic" being prominent amongst them). Recently, at least three major military historians, John Keegan, Carlo D'Este and Max Hastings, have written focused biographies of WSC in his capacity as "warlord". Keegan's book is essentially a monograph (interesting, nonetheless). D'Este wrote a somewhat more encyclopaedic book (WSC's entire military career). Hastings concentrates on WSC as British supreme commander during the years of the Second World War. While all three books are good, Hastings' penetrating assessments and candid observations on the protagonist and those who enter his orbit make for more enjoyable reading.

Hastings nominally begins his story in 1939, the year Great Britain joined France in declaring war on Hitler's Germany. However, necessary historical context from pre-war years is also provided, allowing this book to be read independently of any other biography or study. Despite the book's apparently narrow focus, it can be read without background or understanding of the War, itself.

Not too surprisingly to his more strident critics, WSC made many minor and several major errors in his capacity as wartime Prime Minister. He had a penchant for "meddling" in military affairs, one shared with at least Stalin and Hitler. In common with Hitler, WSC had actual front-line combat experience and, also in common with Hitler, demonstrated bravery in battle. Despite first-hand experience with war and direct, personal knowledge of the consequences of leadership error, both men were fond of audacious and risky enterprises, often-times creating consternation in the ranks of their professional military consultants, sometimes with lamentable results. Hastings unfavorably contrasts the British military with its German counterpart throughout the book, with the British falling far short of their adversaries in professionalism, skill, dedication, improvisation, equipment, strategy and battlefield tactics. For that matter, Hastings made the same unfavorable comparison of American troops to the Germans in "Overlord", his history of the D-Day invasion.

In order to understand the relatively dismal performance of the British Army (in particular), Hastings provides many examples of the incompetence and timidity of the major British commanders who repeatedly come up short in comparison to their North African theater adversary, Rommel and their foe in Italy, Kesselring. However, even their American counterparts seemed to view them with dismissive attitudes. On the British home front, morale was undermined by the seemingly interminable duration of the war, pro-Soviet attitudes of many workers (and their "betters" in the governing classes), residual exhaustion from the labors of the First World War and concerns regarding the post-war course of their nation. Hastings repeatedly emphasizes that, almost single-handedly, WSC provided the leadership example required to sustain the war effort from its earliest years (when the situation seemed most hopeless) through its overly long finale, when the population seemed no longer able or interested in sustaining the effort.

WSC is both lauded and attacked. His penchant for dramatic forays by small "elite" units (which proliferated under his leadership) were generally unsuccessful (1942 Dieppe raid, for example). His emphasis on the Mediterranean theater was distracting from the major war effort. His repeated solicitations to the Americans on behalf of various "pet projects" became distracting and then annoying. Nonetheless, WSC had an over-arching and penetrating understanding of grand strategy and, in service to that understanding, was able to bury his antipathy to Communism recognizing that the contributions of the USSR were arch-critical to the defeat of the Nazi armies. Perhaps the most damning (from both the perspective of Roosevelt's U.S. and from Hastings, himself) was WSC's fealty to the concept of the British Empire. Perceptions that many of Britain's military plans and perspectives were undertaken in service of post-war imperial ambitions soured relations between the Western powers, especially on the U.S. domestic front.

From my perspective, Hastings makes his greatest contribution both in this book and in "Retribution" (the Pacific War) by clarifying many now controversial wartime actions such as the use of atomic weapons ("Retribution") and "area bombing" (both theaters of war). WSC was personally conflicted and committed some of his thoughts to paper. Still, he observed that, "Morale is a legitimate military target" and advocated bombing of German cities not only for that reason (in the early war years to prop up home-front morale) but to convince Stalin that the British were making a meaningful "second front" contribution. Hastings also notes that contemporary technology did not allow "precision bombing" or anything even remotely approaching that concept. Hence, to target factories and military installations, area bombing was necessary. In Hastings' words, "In addressing the history of the Second World War, it is necessary to recognise the huge moral compromises forced upon the nations fighting under the banner of democracy and freedom. Britain, and subsequently America, strove for the triumph of these admirable principles wherever the could be secured-with sometimes embarrassing exceptions of the European overseas empires. But again and again, hard things had to be done which breached faith with any definition of absolute good. If this is true of politics at all times, it was especially so between 1939 and 1945...the moral and material price of destroying Hitler was high...". In "Retribution", Hastings commented that, "But in an imperfect world, it seems unrealistic to expect that any combatant in a war will grant adversaries conspicuously better treatment than his own people receive at their hands". This all rings true and does much to undermine the "post-modern" moral relativism which is currently fashionable. Hastings also repeatedly emphasizes that the Hitler War was won largely due to the efforts and exertions of Stalin's USSR: the role of Lend Lease and the significance of the D-Day landing have been over-amplified with the passage of time.

In summary, Hastings characterizes WSC as, "...one of the greatest actors upon the stage of affairs the world has ever known...If his leadership through the Second World War was imperfect, it is certain that no other British ruler in history has matched his direction of the nation in peril.." Certainly, WSC was the greatest statesman of the modern era and his "grand vision" enabled the eventual defeat of Hitler, cementing as it did a roiled domestic constituency and contentious allies. His "anachronistic delusions" (sometimes making him appear to FDR and others as a "traveler from an antique land") about the future of the British Empire were just that. His magnificent accomplishments dwarf his strategic shortcomings and can only serve as an example to be emulated by any current or future leader with pretensions to greatness.

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