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by Freddie Mae Baxter

  • ISBN: 0375406654
  • Category: Biographies
  • Author: Freddie Mae Baxter
  • Subcategory: Ethnic & National
  • Other formats: doc azw mobi docx
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Random House (May 1, 1999)
  • FB2 size: 1414 kb
  • EPUB size: 1368 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 751
Download The Seventh Child fb2

Freddie Mae Baxter's "The Seventh Child" is as much a guide to having a meaningful life as it is a personal story. This is the book to read and remember whenever you think or believe your life has little or no purpose.

Freddie Mae Baxter's "The Seventh Child" is as much a guide to having a meaningful life as it is a personal story. After reading and sharing it, she's even more of a truly fine lady, now in her 90s. As a great Harlem neighbor, like in "The Seventh Child," she provides deep and cheerful insights on the true meaning of life and living

Freddie Mae Baxter, Gloria Bley Miller. The Seventh Child by. Freddie Mae Baxter

Freddie Mae Baxter, Gloria Bley Miller. Freddie Mae Baxter, Gloria Bley Miller.

The Seventh Child book. This woman, Freddie Mae Baxter, reminds me so much of the elders who raised me or even just had a hand in my upbringing. The memoir is literally just segmented views of hers on everything from family, friends, love, etc and I found so much comfort and gratification reading her points. There's a universal lif I bought this gem of a book at a local bookstore that happened to be going out of business, and after sitting in my room for a year I decided to just knock it out and I am so thankful I did. Freddie Mae is as complex as she is irresistible. The seventh of eight children, she grew up in poverty at the height of Jim Crow. She picked cotton, worked in a factory, and raised the white sons and daughters of Manhattan's Upper East Side. She is a devout believer who disagrees with the Church and a fiscally responsible citizen with a weakness for Atlantic City. Heartwarming, vivid, illuminating, The Seventh Child celebrates the bounty of life's simple joys and introduces an American Soul to be cherished.

In The Seventh Child, Freddie Mae Baxter-75 years old, compassionate, hauntingly wise-tells her story and the story of the twentieth century in her own charming, unforgettable voice. Freddie Mae is as complex as she is irresistible

In The Seventh Child, Freddie Mae Baxter-75 years old, compassionate, hauntingly wise-tells her story and the story of the twentieth century in her own charming, unforgettable voice. She picked cotton, worked in a factory, and raised the white sons and daughters of Manhattans Upper East Side.

Baxter, Freddie Mae, African American women, African Americans, African American women. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Freddie Mae Baxter Liane speaks with Freddie Mae Baxter whose book of memoirs has just been published. In "The Seventh Child: A Lucky Life" (Knopf), Baxter, age 75, tells the story of her life growing up poor in a big family in segregated South Carolina and moving to New York City looking for work as a domestic.

See all books authored by Freddie Mae Baxter, including The Seventh Child: A Lucky Life, and The Seventh Child, and more on ThriftBooks. Books by Freddie Mae Baxter. The Seventh Child: A Lucky Life. More by Gloria Bley Miller. Gloria Bley Miller, Freddie Mae Baxter.

Freddie Fox as Freddie Baxter in Cucumber (TV Mini-Series 2015). If all bisexuals and pansexuals walked through life with the confidence of Freddie Baxter, we would legitimately be able to take over and rule the universe. freddie baxter confident not because of bravado but because he knows who he is is enough which is pretty awesome bisexual pansexual cucumber banana tofu.

rs that sat in buckets and pitchers of water throughout the house; I would hand her the long, slender green stems, which she resolutely arranged in a row on the kitchen counter, crushing them with a hammer before putting them in vases

In a heartwarming memoir of a remarkable African-American family, a woman describes growing up in rural South Carolina, her father's desertion, her struggle to help support her large family, and her move to New York in search of a better life. Reprint. 30,000 first printing.
Reviews about The Seventh Child (7):
Hanelynai
Freddie Mae Baxter's "The Seventh Child" is as much a guide to having a meaningful life as it is a personal story. This is the book to read and remember whenever you think or believe your life has little or no purpose. After reading and sharing it, she's even more of a truly fine lady, now in her 90s. As a great Harlem neighbor, like in "The Seventh Child," she provides deep and cheerful insights on the true meaning of life and living. I always hoped to encounter her during this past spring and summer as she strolls on her errands down Malcolm X Boulevard (Lenox Avenue). Anyone that considers themselves to be young, a "hipster", middle-age or older can learn a lot from Ms. Baxter's book. "The Seventh Child" is a literary keeper that could be a good movie as well.
Dyni
Was very disappointed. I expected a read that would touch my soul; after all this writer is a senior and during the times of her childhood life was very hurtful and unfair to those born with black skin. This book had not one story of an unpleasant happening. It is simply not believable that she had a far happier and better life (childhood) than I did.....and I have white skin. It was difficult to finish the book because it was so dry and actually boring. I am 80 year old and have read many books and this is the only book I have read that leaves me with nothing. I gave it away.
Nuadabandis
This is great and interesting story. Very easy to read. I'm pleased to have read about this person and her life.
Tam
Growing up in 1930s South Carolina, Freddie Mae Baxter was the youngest of eight children in a poor and fatherless family.

Nonetheless, Baxter's charming recollections indicate a happy life, full of simple pleasures, needs and desires. Life was slower-paced, and no one seemed to want much to be content. Lacking many material possessions, families were closer, and friends were for life.

In the '40s, young Freddie Mae moved to New York, hoping for a better life. She ended up spending the next few decades in a succession of domestic jobs, and although she never married, she loved and provided richly for nieces, nephews, and neighborhood children.

In addition to bits and pieces of Baxter's past, this collection of vignettes also offers her thoughts on a variety of subjects, including family relationships, social evils, and her love for music.

This quick, quirky read will leave an impression upon readers for some time to come.
Kupidon
This is the most enjoyable and insightful book I've ever read!! This lady (Miss Baxter) has beaten all of the odds. She has inherent common sense, wit and skill. I admire extremely how she's led her life: being a good daughter, a good person, a natural born leader, mercy tempered with an abundance of common sense, family oriented, etc. I just wish she could live a second life to do all the things that were denied her in her youth and beyond. Miss Baxter is an Exhorter: this is a person who brings sunshine and hope into the lives of everyone she meets. If my life could be a third as full as hers, I would die happy! And I haven't forgotten Miss Gloria Bley Miller! Miss Miller: This looks like a labor of love to me. It is an excellent work. Thank you so much for taking it all down!!!!!!
Winail
I read this book with utter delight. She tells it like it is and hold no punches. She tells of her life and some of her siblings while growing up economically poor but spiritually rich. She suffers the loss of her mother as a teenager and abandoned by her father in youth and still manages to hold on to wonderful values and doesn't make excuses like so many do today. She finds pleasure in the most simple things of life and doesn't demand a $125 dollar pair of Nike's shoes to be happy. If you can read this book do so, and let some of her richness rub off on you.
Onnell
I loved reading this book through Freddie Mae's eyes. She is an optimistic overcomer and loves deeply-- I can just tell :)
Thanks to Gloria Bley Miller for recognizing the simple, yet poignant story Ms. Baxter had to tell. Ms. Baxter's story is so ordinary it's extraordinary in it's basic core in the black community. My mother, her sisters, and their mother could have written this story. I love the strength and independence of black females and Ms. Baxter provides a beacon that demonstrates the values we all aspire to: truth, light, peace and harmony.

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